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  • Moving Fastball(sink, cut)Help me

    I've been pitching lately, and I throw a four seam fastball, a curveball, and a changeup, I have a very good curve, its like 11-7 drop, I'm still working on my changeup and if I get it down in the zone it is very effective, my fastball I have pretty good accuracy with it and I can keep it low in the zone, and throw it in guys eyes, Im just looking for another pitch like maybe a two-seam but I need the proper way to throw it so I get good movement on it, maybe pictures of how to throw a Cut Fastball, Sinker, Or 2-seam, and I will appreciate it, thanks.
    Strikeouts are boring - besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls. More democratic. - Bull Durham


    Baseball is the only place where a Sacrifice is very appreciated.

    A baseball park is the one place where a man's wife doesn't mind his getting excited over somebody else's curves. ~Brendan Francis

  • #2
    Learn a forkball, my dad was throwing them to me today and they were great, keep in mind he's 60....

    they're pretty easy to throw, they're crazy once you got them in control.

    The way you throw them is with the middle and next to middle finger closed and your pinky and index finger on the ball.

    They're kind of hard to control since you only got two fingers on the damn thing, but they're nice pitches. If you're throwing it right it should break down and away, at least that's where my dad's go.
    "I feel like I'm the luckiest man on the face of the planet, I might have had a bad break or two but I have an awful lot to live for, thank you."
    -Lou Gehrig

    "You can learn little from victory. You can learn everything from defeat."
    - Christy Matthewson

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    • #3
      doesn't make sense
      Strikeouts are boring - besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls. More democratic. - Bull Durham


      Baseball is the only place where a Sacrifice is very appreciated.

      A baseball park is the one place where a man's wife doesn't mind his getting excited over somebody else's curves. ~Brendan Francis

      Comment


      • #4
        2 seam fastball. grip it out from ur hands with the seam an to make it cut down an in put pressure on ur index finger an to go down an away put pressure on ur middle finger. make sure your hand stays on top of the ball.

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        • #5
          1st how old are you?

          If under 18

          Stop throwing the curve and any other pitch

          Your arm will thank you

          Just perfect your 4 seam, 2 seam and changeup

          Ask any succesful pitcher, most never threw a curve on a regular basis until rookie ball

          Those who have, well, they arms blew out

          Trust me, this is from experience

          Comment


          • #6
            the rule for curve was changed to 14-15. scouts nowadays look for a goodcurveball as well, because most guys aren't blowing people away with a fastball so the players need something with movement on them. 18 is a little extreme an age to throw a curveball because if u have the right kind of training an throw it right you can throw it without doing damage.

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            • #7
              Yea Mobile, they make look for that, because to scouts you are a piece of meat

              For your own safety and better fundementals

              Learn the 4 seam, 2 seam and changeup...learn how to make the pitching motiong the SAME for all 3 pitches

              Experiment on trying to slow down the change greatly with the same motion as your fastball

              Work on velocity, build up your legs, work on your stride

              When you master those 3 pitches, then start learning a curve or any other pitch, but if you have those 3 pitches, which are the easiest on the arm, then blowing out your arm because you wanted a 6 pitch horrible repetorie

              I knew a guy that could throw 7 mediocre pitches....and then a Pitcher who threw only a 4 seamer and changeup, but you couldn't pick it up

              Guess who was tougher?

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              • #8
                yea, i don't throw my curve much in a game, i've been throwing a curve for a few years now, and im getting a 11-7 drop on it which I like, I started getting problems when I experienced with a cutter I elarned from this one site, and when I threw sliders, curves I dont have a problem with, Im trying to learn a moving fastball, because If you look at most successful pitchers there most fastballs work pretty well(Mariano Rivera, Kevin Brown, Pedro Martinez, Roger Clemens, and Randy Johnson) Ill try to two-seam grip, I am not going to throw curves until next spring because I don't have to, Im really working on my changeup more than any other pitch, and when I get it down with two strikes the batter can't lay off
                Strikeouts are boring - besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls. More democratic. - Bull Durham


                Baseball is the only place where a Sacrifice is very appreciated.

                A baseball park is the one place where a man's wife doesn't mind his getting excited over somebody else's curves. ~Brendan Francis

                Comment


                • #9
                  If you want different movements on your fastball try putting added pressure on your fingers. I mean different combos, like more on your middle finger or more on your pointer. Also try gripping it differently.
                  Lets Go Yankees

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                  • #10
                    Okay... if you want more movement on your 2 seam fastball:

                    You know where the ball is the narrowest right? Put your first 2 fingers in the middle of the seams, then your thumb underneath (so that your thumb is bisecting your 2 fingers on top... that means your thumb is in the middle of your first 2 fingers) Now, thats a standard 2 seamer. If you move your thumb to the left more, or to the right more, it will break in or out, depending on where your thumb is. Experiment with that grip while your playing catch and ask your partner which way it moves.

                    GG GL HF
                    While I do prefer to interact with people in a gentle manner... I'm also not at all opposed to establishing my dominance in a reign of terror.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      On the issue of the curveball, it depends entirely on how you throw it. If you routinely snap your elbow in any way, shape, or manner, for 20-25 pitches every 5 days for 20-30 games a year, you're going to have elbow problems no matter what age you are. It doesn't matter if you're 16, 22, or any other age I've seen recommended. Not everyone gets the same symptoms, but everyone is nearly guaranteed to get a symptom of some kind.

                      This is the only unarguable fact I'll offer here, the rest is based off of my personal experience and is quite open to debate. I feel like I may have learned the hard way. I had a curve that was pretty hard to hit in high school, but I did it by turning over on my elbow. As a result, I got some pretty intense tendon/ligament pains on the inside of my upper arm, just above the elbow, by the time I was a junior and senior. I didn't know any better and kept throwing it, thinking I'd tough it out. Well, this I did, but ugh, I must be a slow learner. Those were a long two years and my coaches wondered what the hell had happened to me.

                      As evidence that I don't just have a faulty elbow, I've since talked to many older, more experienced pitchers and nearly every single one relates to this story. Stories similar to this are unfortunately common.

                      Last summer, after eight years of thinking my arm was shot, I realized how much I missed ball and I started throwing again. The pain started creeping back, but I started reading up on it and talking to people more experienced. I discovered that all movement must be achieved through snapping the wrist and fingers ONLY.

                      At first, I was like, what? I didn't realize how effective it could be. There are a few ways to do this, but I learned to throw my curve with a knuckle-curve grip. When I throw, my palm is facing to my left, I snap my wrist down and my middle finger over the top of the ball, with a goal of 12-6 spin. Due to old habits, I have to concentrate on keeping my elbow from twisting.

                      Throwing a slider is an equally contentious matter. I personally hold mine like a two-seam fastball, except I place my index and middle finger just on the left of the seams (for a right-hander). I use the seams to place downward torque by using a technique that is best described as "slicing butter" with your hand. Do not go over or come under the ball. Come down the side and develop tactile fingertips. Again, my elbow never ever twists. Shooting a basketball repeatedly at short-range off your fingertips is a great way to develop this tactility.

                      These are hard pitches when you're young because your hands are still maturing, your control is still developing, and, most especially, you just love getting your friends out. But practice and please be patient, if you don't want long-term damage.

                      Experiment with different things and practice these pitches with a catcher and a hitter who can see the ball well enough to offer you feedback as to what the ball does. If the ball isn't moving for you yet, practice with a whiffle ball or ragball (which has raised seams for increased movement and won't hurt any batters or catchers as you're honing your control) so you can know if you're on the right track or not. Be patient!

                      If kept low-away, these two pitches will lead to a lot of strikeouts and groundouts. They dip a lot and offer a nice change of speed, but, in addition to the recovered health of my elbow, the most welcome reason I discovered to throw with these techniques is that they are much much harder for the batter to pick up the release than from someone who snaps their elbow. A good hitter will see that twisted arm angle and instantly know where that pitch is coming. (And in turn, going! I assure you that you'll eventually get plenty of practice trying to snag line drives up the middle...)

                      I understand, these grips might not work for everyone, but I'd encourage you to keep looking for something that does not require a twisting of the elbow. I still have some lingering elbow pain from my past mistakes in technique, but my arm endurance has doubled since high school (despite my body being in much poorer overall shape) and my control is now one of my strengths since I feel very little arm pain any more.

                      And related to this issue of arm pain, I also always have to always recommend to always always ice your elbow after you throw, even if you're young and feel no pain or if you threw just a short pen. If you love baseball and want to play the rest of your life as I now fully intend, keep your elbow from twisting and always ice.

                      Sorry for writing so much. I welcome comments or arguments.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'll keep this one much shorter. For a cutter, what I do is the opposite of my slider. I hold the ball with a two-seam grip, but move my fingers to the right of the seams. Then I torque down on the left side of the ball with the fingers as I snap my wrist. I do not twist my elbow, a la a screwball, not only because it would be bad for it but it would also take away from the ball's velocity.

                        This grip seems to not work for everyone, and I agree with Echy88 and XFactor that you need to experiment with all sorts of things. The techniques they mention are commonly effective.

                        I'm still working on a sinker, but my cutter has been a huge tool. I don't throw that hard (~75 mph) and it'll cut four inches in on a right hander. If you play in a league that necesitates more movement, you can probably throw harder than me, leading to that extra cut.

                        When I throw this up-in (especially mixed in with breaking balls out-away), this has led to ridiculous numbers of pop-ups to my middle infielders. This pitch is especially effective against wood bats, but even aluminum bats have had much trouble with this.
                        Last edited by Bill Lee; 08-07-2005, 11:21 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Imapotato
                          1st how old are you?

                          If under 18

                          Stop throwing the curve and any other pitch

                          Your arm will thank you

                          Just perfect your 4 seam, 2 seam and changeup

                          Ask any succesful pitcher, most never threw a curve on a regular basis until rookie ball

                          Those who have, well, they arms blew out

                          Trust me, this is from experience
                          hahahahaha, ok a curveball if thrown right wont throw out ur arm orr give u arm troubles, dont throw a slider that will do it, but a curveball, oh my thats pitiful, keep throwing a curveball son, it wont hurt ur arm

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Imapotato
                            1st how old are you?

                            If under 18

                            Stop throwing the curve and any other pitch

                            Your arm will thank you

                            Just perfect your 4 seam, 2 seam and changeup

                            Ask any succesful pitcher, most never threw a curve on a regular basis until rookie ball

                            Those who have, well, they arms blew out

                            Trust me, this is from experience
                            If you blow your arm out from throwing curveballs,then do what I did
                            and start throwing knuckleballs. There a heck of a lot easier to throw and it hardly causes strain on your arm
                            The Magic Number is : 37

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              cutter is thrown a lot like a fastball except the only thing that changes is the grip which you grip like a curveball, i can't remember if your also supposed to turn your wrist or not but i believe not. IMO i usually throw my curveball just as hard as my fastball and i just change the grip an i cock my wrist and thats about it.

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