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Have high school sports become irrelevant to college recruiters?

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  • Have high school sports become irrelevant to college recruiters?

    More on this: http://highschoolsports.al.com/news/...ge-recruiters/

    Do you agree or disagree, and why?

  • #2
    on the small college level (where you have a better shot at playing) i do not believe this is the case---i think this article only speaks to a tiny fraction of kids ---the top notch d1 players

    for the rest of the kids---they should probably play HS ball too
    Last edited by justsomecoach; 09-12-2016, 07:30 AM.
    13U Coach in God's Country (the Midwest)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by BBSG View Post
      More on this: http://highschoolsports.al.com/news/...ge-recruiters/

      Do you agree or disagree, and why?
      Disagree...

      HS is still VERY relevant and absolutely necessary... ESPECIALLY so if you're in a top district, playing good competition...

      PerfectGame events can definitely be extremely beneficial as well...

      I think they both go hand-in-hand...
      I don't like my balls to smell like pickles.

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      • #4
        High school ball has not become irrelevant. Colleges coaches still talk to high school coaches. A summer coach isn't tuned in to academics and citizenship the way the high school coach is. A high school coach spends a lot more time around the player. Summer ball has always been more relevant in terms of talent. I was recruited from my Legion team back in the 70's. Summer competition has always been more challenging whether it's Legion when I went through the process or travel for my kids.

        From a viewing talent standpoint colleges coaches have far more time to watch games in the summer than spring. They're busy coaching in the spring. Showcases and tournaments afford coaches the opportunity to see a lot of players in one location rather than heading from game to game.

        The relevance of high school ball is more for pro prospects. High school ball allows scouts to see the prospect before the draft. While the level of competition isn't as challenging scouts are looking at tools not results six months later from the last time they saw them play in the summer against top competition.

        A handful of elite prospects will be recruited before high school. It's probably a tenth of one percent of future college athletes. Some of these don't pan out. An 8th grader verballed to USC a few years ago from a QB camp. By the time he was a senior he wasn't a top QB prospect.

        There is a huge danger to verballing early. No commitment is signed until senior year. A lot can happen in a college sports program from 8th grade to senior year. There may be a new coaching staff not interested in the player's style of play. The coaching staff may not be compatible for the player. In the meantime the player has become mostly invisible to other college programs because he was committed.

        The idea of recruiting early teens is absurd. Many top college prospects are pro busts. For girls it's Team USA or bust in most sports. A college education is very important. How many thirteen and fourteen year olds have a clue what they want to major in college?

        Girls mature sooner. My daughter received offers after the summer of freshman year of high school. I told her to wait a year. She was even better by the next year and received more offers. The ones from the previous year were still there.

        The NCAA (an awful organization I compare to the Mafia extorting money from college sports) needs to step in on early recruiting. Colleges shou,d not be allowed to talk to athletes until they start their junior year. Once the talking starts allow NLI's to be signed junior year. The colleges currently hold all the cards with early verbal and not being able to sign until senior year.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
          The NCAA (an awful organization I compare to the Mafia extorting money from college sports) needs to step in on early recruiting. Colleges should not be allowed to talk to athletes until they start their junior year. Once the talking starts allow NLI's to be signed junior year. The colleges currently hold all the cards with early verbal and not being able to sign until senior year.
          I really like this idea.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by BMize View Post
            I really like this idea.
            Well, almost...

            How about they can recruit and offer as early as they want - but all offers have to be 4 year guaranteed, can't be rescinded by the school for anything other than failure to meet minimum academic acceptance.

            Worst case scenario for the kid - he still gets his education paid for. Worst case for the school - they miss on a projection and have to eat the scholarship.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ralanprod View Post
              Well, almost...

              How about they can recruit and offer as early as they want - but all offers have to be 4 year guaranteed, can't be rescinded by the school for anything other than failure to meet minimum academic acceptance.

              Worst case scenario for the kid - he still gets his education paid for. Worst case for the school - they miss on a projection and have to eat the scholarship.
              The power fives are allowed to offer four year rides. It's meaningless. Any kid heading D1 believes he's a pro prospect at some level heading into college. All the coach has to do to scare him away is say, "We will honor our obligation. But I can't see you ever getting on the field." The kid is going to run quickly and find a new place to play and attend college.

              Only one kid in my son's program stayed and never started. He believed he was going to start junior year. He was overlooking the ten to fifteen new recruits who arrive annually. By the time he realized he was wrong he was past the point of no return. At that point he stayed for a degree from a Big Ten and stayed on the team. That a kid could go through the commitment and never start in four years is pure devotion.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
                The power fives are allowed to offer four year rides. It's meaningless. Any kid heading D1 believes he's a pro prospect at some level heading into college. All the coach has to do to scare him away is say, "We will honor our obligation. But I can't see you ever getting on the field." The kid is going to run quickly and find a new place to play and attend college.
                This brings up something that I've wondered about regarding college baseball....when I played football in the Ivy League many years ago it was not uncommon for a recruited football player to stop playing soon after arriving at school. In fact some never even when out for the team freshman year. As no one was on an official "athletic scholarship" there were really no practical repercussions for the student. He essentially used football as an admissions tool and then gave it up when it no longer worked for him. Does the same thing happen in baseball programs that don't give athletic money (DIII)?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bolts-Baseball View Post
                  Disagree...

                  HS is still VERY relevant and absolutely necessary... ESPECIALLY so if you're in a top district, playing good competition...
                  This. Do well in a large school conference known for good competition. ^^^

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
                    The power fives are allowed to offer four year rides. It's meaningless. Any kid heading D1 believes he's a pro prospect at some level heading into college. All the coach has to do to scare him away is say, "We will honor our obligation. But I can't see you ever getting on the field." The kid is going to run quickly and find a new place to play and attend college.

                    Only one kid in my son's program stayed and never started. He believed he was going to start junior year. He was overlooking the ten to fifteen new recruits who arrive annually. By the time he realized he was wrong he was past the point of no return. At that point he stayed for a degree from a Big Ten and stayed on the team. That a kid could go through the commitment and never start in four years is pure devotion.
                    That's all true, but I see it as worst case scenario the kid at least has a guaranteed education and the team has a scholarship against their count. It would at least give the player some leverage. At the least it would be better for the player than the current verbal one sided situation.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KylesDad View Post
                      This brings up something that I've wondered about regarding college baseball....when I played football in the Ivy League many years ago it was not uncommon for a recruited football player to stop playing soon after arriving at school. In fact some never even when out for the team freshman year. As no one was on an official "athletic scholarship" there were really no practical repercussions for the student. He essentially used football as an admissions tool and then gave it up when it no longer worked for him. Does the same thing happen in baseball programs that don't give athletic money (DIII)?
                      If you're a top academic D3 or Ivy it's about a lot more than about baseball. Not many kids would transfer from these situations. Besides, transferring down from a D3? It's better just to stay at the top academic college.

                      My son received very early interest from Hopkins before his baseball talent exploded. There was an external contact attempting to push the coaching staff and my son together. I told him Hopkins is a hell of a safety school option.
                      Last edited by JettSixty; 09-12-2016, 06:48 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ralanprod View Post
                        That's all true, but I see it as worst case scenario the kid at least has a guaranteed education and the team has a scholarship against their count. It would at least give the player some leverage. At the least it would be better for the player than the current verbal one sided situation.
                        But the kid is looking for more than an education. He's looking for his shot at becoming a legit pro prospect.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JettSixty View Post
                          But the kid is looking for more than an education. He's looking for his shot at becoming a legit pro prospect.
                          Well, most of them probably. Perhaps a hard limit on all scholarships - both offered and current?

                          Basically there has to be a system where coaches are also shouldering risk, not just the player. Of course we are talking NCAA here, so there's little chance of anything like that ever happening.

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                          • #14
                            20% of the population can not afford showcases, club teams or private lessons. So ya still very influential and necessary!
                            Primum non nocere

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                            • #15
                              There is some variance between sports. Softball in PA is a total crap shoot. There are some very good high school softball teams. And some that are slightly better than rec ball teams. When my daughter was going through the recruiting stage, very few coaches had any interest at all in high school ball. Their focus was on tournaments / travel ball. She did have two coaches that expressed interest in seeing a high school game and both attended one. DD warned them in advance about the quality of play. Neither one had any interest in the qualify of play. They were well aware that the program was a train wreck. Their interest was seeing her leadership skills. She currently plays for one of those colleges.
                              "Once you stop learning, you start dying" -- Albert Einstein.

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