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  • Baseball on film

    Please excuse me ahead of time if I have placed this in the wrong forum.

    What I am looking for is the first time the game of baseball was put to motion on film(moving picture). Also looking for the title and what it was that took place on the film(I assume it is of the newsreel variety).

    Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks ahead of time for your help/response.

  • #2
    Tje Baseball Almanac lists the first Baseball movie as Right Off teh Bat in 1915 I am not sure if that is what you are looking for. But that is what I found.

    Personally the best IMO baseball film was Pride of the Yankees. Not just because I'm a Yankee fan. But because I feel Gary Cooper and Theresa Wright gave me a feeling I knew Lou and Eleanor Gehrig personally. It was that great a film.

    Welcome back ARod. Hope you are a Yankee forever.
    Phil Rizzuto-a Yankee forever.

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    • #3
      thomas edison erected america's first film studio in 1892 - they started with vaudeville acts then moved to sports

      the first live sporting event ever filmed was a lightwieght match between michael leonard and jack cushing in july 1894

      in 1898 edison released the first baseball movie titled The Ball Game (at times referenced as The Ballplayer), a series of disoriented shots of baseball

      Casey was released in 1899 - a short film without a plot - also had nothing to do with Casey at the Bat

      earliest known baseball movies with a plot was How the Office Boy Saw the Ball Game in 1906 and also in 1906 Baseball on the Bench

      nickelodeons featured baseball highlights during the 1900s - the first world series filmed in part was 1908 but baseball was difficult/impossible to film under the technology and in fact serious efforts wouldn't take place until the 1940s

      first instructional film was 1914

      first color video of major leaguers - 1938

      tris speaker and marty mchale produced movies of individual major league stars in 1917
      Last edited by Brian McKenna; 06-29-2006, 09:32 AM.

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      • #4
        The Baseball HOF might have a file on early baseball films. I am curious too. I know the World Series sometime between 1910-1920 was filmed and shown to audiences at theaters for an admission price. I ran across a minor league game that was filmed and shown to audiences at a theater according to a newspaper I read. There had to be a lot more.

        The next question is if any of these films were preserved somehow?
        "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
        "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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        • #5
          This is probably old news for most of you, but hopefully most people here have had some interaction with Doak Ewing at Rare Sports Films (www.raresportsfilms.com). Doak has done a wonderful job restoring old baseball films, documentaries, even commercials, and bringing them to DVD/VHS, most for only $29.95. He's got some film from the mid-teens (the 1913 opening of Ebbets Field, coverage of the 1919 World Series with clips of Shoeless Joe Jackson, etc.), all the way through 1970. I highly recommend it for anyone interested in pre-1970 video of the stars of yesteryear.

          -JJA
          The outcome of our children is infinitely more important than the outcome of any game they will ever play

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          • #6
            JJA describes Rare Sports Films very well. Most of these wonderfully restored films are highlight tapes of various events and years,ranging from 25 minutes to an hour. They also have the only two known complete games,pre-video. I bought the first,a 1969 game between the Cubs and Phillies for about $49.95. Rare Sports Films has something for every baseball fan.




            Originally posted by JJA
            This is probably old news for most of you, but hopefully most people here have had some interaction with Doak Ewing at Rare Sports Films (www.raresportsfilms.com). Doak has done a wonderful job restoring old baseball films, documentaries, even commercials, and bringing them to DVD/VHS, most for only $29.95. He's got some film from the mid-teens (the 1913 opening of Ebbets Field, coverage of the 1919 World Series with clips of Shoeless Joe Jackson, etc.), all the way through 1970. I highly recommend it for anyone interested in pre-1970 video of the stars of yesteryear.

            -JJA

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JohnGelnarFan
              JJA describes Rare Sports Films very well. Most of these wonderfully restored films are highlight tapes of various events and years,ranging from 25 minutes to an hour. They also have the only two known complete games,pre-video. I bought the first,a 1969 game between the Cubs and Phillies for about $49.95. Rare Sports Films has something for every baseball fan.
              Doak Ewing's kinescopes of the 1969 Cubs-Phillies and 1972 Giants-Cubs games are merely, the two oldest regular season telecasts. There are complete World Series telecasts that go back farther, like select games from 1952, 1965, and 1968.

              Sheesh, Doak charges 50 smackers for one game??? Is the DVD case gold plated or something?
              Last edited by Redondos; 07-09-2006, 08:49 AM.

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              • #8
                Redondos,

                The problem he's got is the pitiful market out there for vintage film. How many old games of any type are people willing to buy? I would bet that he sells maybe 10 of some of those old games. For all the time he has to put in to get the film onto DVD, he can't be making a lot of money.

                Yes, it's a lot of money, but I'm thankful someone has it out there. If you've got suggestions on other places to get similar products, I'm definitely listening. As far as I can tell Doak is all there is.

                -JJA
                The outcome of our children is infinitely more important than the outcome of any game they will ever play

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JJA
                  Redondos,

                  The problem he's got is the pitiful market out there for vintage film. How many old games of any type are people willing to buy? I would bet that he sells maybe 10 of some of those old games. For all the time he has to put in to get the film onto DVD, he can't be making a lot of money.

                  Yes, it's a lot of money, but I'm thankful someone has it out there. If you've got suggestions on other places to get similar products, I'm definitely listening. As far as I can tell Doak is all there is.

                  -JJA
                  Oh, Doak's been selling VHS copies of that '69 Cubs-Phillies game for nearly 20 years, my friend. In all that time, he's sold significantly more than 10 units. And whatever costs he incurred in restoring that old Armed Forces Network kinescope has been covered a long, LONG, time ago.

                  Doak may not be raking in the millions that, say, Steve Sabol and NFL Films takes in. But as his flier says, he's made enough money from Rare Sportsfilms that it is his full time gig. And it does more than pay his bills. He was able to afford building a climate controlled vault to store all his films. So we ain't talkin' about no "working out of the garage" kind of business.

                  With all that said, Doak does put out high quality products. And he promptly ships out tapes and DVDs that are ordered. I personally think that it does not quite justify the exorbitant prices that he charges. But that's just my opinion.

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                  • #10
                    My grandfather, Dominic Tronolone, was a pioneer in the motion picture industry. The first baseball game ever filmed was by him from a rooftop near the Brooklyn stadium in the early 1900's, either 1905 or 1915. He developed the film in his Brooklyn lab and then showed it in a theater he had rented. He was sued to stop his activity. He later was President Wilson's personal photographer at the WWI Paris Peace talks and became the President of Pathe Labs. He also held the first patent on a talking motion picture camera with Thomas Edison.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Redondos View Post
                      Doak Ewing's kinescopes of the 1969 Cubs-Phillies and 1972 Giants-Cubs games are merely, the two oldest regular season telecasts. There are complete World Series telecasts that go back farther, like select games from 1952, 1965, and 1968.
                      Where are these available, please?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by spark240 View Post
                        Where are these available, please?
                        See post #5
                        Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
                          See post #5
                          Those World Series films are not complete games. He's got five innings or so from 1957 Game 6, much less from other years.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by spark240 View Post
                            Those World Series films are not complete games. He's got five innings or so from 1957 Game 6, much less from other years.
                            I think he tells you, right? I don't think he represents it as a full game?
                            Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
                            Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RuthMayBond View Post
                              I think he tells you, right? I don't think he represents it as a full game?
                              Yes, raresportsfilms.com lists the duration in minutes of each video/DVD (most are less than an hour for an entire Series), and only the two regular season games are represented as complete.

                              I think there was a misunderstanding... what I was asking Redondos (or anyone who knew) was where--not from Rare Sports Films--the complete films of pre-1969 World Series games were available, since he had said,

                              Originally posted by Redondos View Post
                              Doak Ewing's kinescopes of the 1969 Cubs-Phillies and 1972 Giants-Cubs games are merely, the two oldest regular season telecasts. There are complete World Series telecasts that go back farther,

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