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  • I loved that book. It was one of the first "mainstream" books on the Negro Leagues, I read and it whetted my appetite for more -- although I thought the book was a main course in itself.
    Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

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    • "I Live for This"

      Just got done reading, "I Live for This" by Bill Plaschke and Tommy Lasorda. Growing up a huge Cardinals fan I learned to hate the Dodgers for one reason or another, therefore never being a fan of Lasorda. However, this book really opened up my eyes at the kind of person Tommy Lasorda is. With Lasorda being listed as a co-writer, this book was very pro-Lasorda. Through this book however we learned how Lasorda dealt with everything from being a struggling pitcher to weight loss. However, one glaring ommission was that there was nothing about his son who passed away. I thought that the book gave so many great life lessons that it could have really opened up to those who have lost a child and learn how Lasorda dealt with that issue. I'm sure Lasorda doesn't like to openly talk about it, but I thought it was a missed opportunity to possibly help those who have lost a child heal. Lasorda seems to have that healing ability. For a look into Lasorda's life with rose colored glasses, this book was pretty good. Very quick read (about 220 pages). Nothing too in depth, but very inspiring at times.

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      • Nice review, JR! I wasn't sure I wanted to read that one -- for the reason you mentioned. But apparently, Tommy's ego isn't toally in the way... Very strange indeed, that the son who paased away wasn't mentioned. Sometimes people who are always positive can't deal with anything that isn't.
        Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

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        • Just started reading "Negro League Baseball: The Rise and Fall of a Black Institution" by Neil Lanctot.

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          • I'm reading Sporting News' The Complete Baseball Record & Fact Book 2006 Edition.

            Unfortunately it was the last edition ever published before they discontinued the line.
            sigpic

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            • "Ball Four" by Jim Bouton

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              • Finishing up Gene Carney's Burying the Black Sox tonight and I've also been reading Derek Zumsteg's The Cheater's Guide to Baseball. Crazy '08 by Cait Murphy is on my nightstand and I'll start that any day.

                Just ordered Big and Little Poison by Clifton Blue Parker and Jim Ettaro's Baseball Without Strikes.
                "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
                "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
                "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
                "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

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                • here's mine

                  The Pacific Coast League, 1903-1988 (Paperback)

                  I got it from the library and many stats were heavily edited by someone before me.

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                  • I really hate it when stuff like that happens. You just get all cozy with a publication, and some humongous corporation buys the publishing house, or else the original publishers can't make enough money to put it out any more.

                    I really miss The Baseball Encyclopedia. No joy in Mudville when that one died....
                    Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

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                    • Hallelulah, Keystone!

                      What was great about it? To the uninitiated into this fraternity, you could answer questions like "Which of Cal Ripken's or Ozzie Smith's 2B formed the best double play combination?" or "Which 4 starting pitchers on which teams came closest to repeating the 1970 Orioles' feat of 4 20 game winners?" This was because each season was broken down carefully by starting lineups and with backup player stats. All players were listed in detail in the main section. However, if you wanted to answer questions like these, you had to guess and check, which is ridiculous if you are serious about an answer. Total Baseball does not, repeat 'does not' answer this.

                      I guess I'm on a rant, but I am hoping someone from MacMillan Publishing will read this try again with 'The Big Mac'.
                      Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                      A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                      Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

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                      • :bowdown::bowdown::bowdown:
                        Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

                        Comment


                        • Finishing up Gene Carney's Burying the Black Sox tonight and I've also been reading Derek Zumsteg's The Cheater's Guide to Baseball. Crazy '08 by Cait Murphy is on my nightstand and I'll start that any day.

                          Just ordered Big and Little Poison by Clifton Blue Parker and Jim Ettaro's Baseball Without Strikes.


                          Crazy '08 is fantastic! Highly recommended...... especially for Cub fans!

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                          • As mentioned previously, A Mathematician Goes To The Ballpark was good, but not great. It was heavy on statistics in the formal sense, with plenty of probability theory.

                            Just started Baseball and The Mythic Moment, by James Hardy, Jr. This one promises to be a great book, since the first chapter has been very well researched and filled with anecdotes.
                            Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                            A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                            Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

                            Comment


                            • Probably the last person on the board to start on Between the Numbers, but just received it in the mail. Also, The Book, so I should be disappearing for quite a while.
                              Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

                              Comment


                              • Press Box Red

                                I just started reading Press Box Red: The Story of Lester Rodney, the Communist Who Helped Break the Color Line in American Sports by Irwin Silber and it is fascinating. It is a mix of Silber's writing and research along with interviews with Lester Rodney to tell the story of the influence The Daily Worker newspaper's sportspage had on breaking the color line in baseball. The introduction is by Jules Tygiel.

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