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  • The Brooklyn Dodgers: An Informal History by Frank Graham Jr. Found a 1948 HC edition in an antique store this week. It's the first one of the Putnam team histories that I've read. Pretty good so far.

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    • Just started October 1964 by David Halberstam. I want to find out once and for all if Bob Gibson is overrated. It's keeping me awake at night.
      They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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      • Getting ready to begin Opening Day... The Story about Jackie Robinsons 1st season. Any thoughts on the book???

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        • Originally posted by scottybr7 View Post
          Getting ready to begin Opening Day... The Story about Jackie Robinsons 1st season. Any thoughts on the book???
          Some of it was pretty eye opening.

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          • Originally posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
            Just started October 1964 by David Halberstam. I want to find out once and for all if Bob Gibson is overrated. It's keeping me awake at night.
            This book contained a story about Gibson that made me want to puke.

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            • Originally posted by 1964Senators View Post
              I have just finished reading Miracle Ball, which is an account of a two-year search for the home-run ball hit by Bobby Thomson in the final game of the 1951 NL playoff.
              It's outstanding. It reads as more of a mystery than the other books written on the Dodgers-Giants playoff race and series. It has a nice ebb and flow to it, as the author tries to uncover a 55 year-old mystery.
              The subject matter has always fascinated me. And this is a completely new perspective on the most historic (in my eyes) game in baseball history. Others may like game 6 of the 1975 or 1986 World Series, or game 7 of the 1960 World Series. But there is such a magical atmosphere regarding this game. And the search back and forth across the country for the missing ball does nothing to dispel that magic.
              I cannot recommend this book enough.
              I hope you like it.

              Not a terribly long book... I read it in one day (started it at lunch and basically could not put it down.)

              Miracle Ball is simply outstanding.
              The indvidual who caught the ball, and why it has never surfaced? It makes perfect sense now. Instantly at top 5 baseball book for me, and an absolute must read for any fan of the Polo Grounds, The Shot Heard Round the World, or the NY Giants.
              "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

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              • I'm about halfway finished with George Will's 'Men At Work'. Although a bit dated, their is alot of good facts and figures in the book. Does anyone know if he wrote a followup to this book?
                My collection of autographs: TTM Autos

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                • Originally posted by Extra Innings View Post
                  I'm about halfway finished with George Will's 'Men At Work'. Although a bit dated, their is alot of good facts and figures in the book. Does anyone know if he wrote a followup to this book?
                  Yes, he wrote "Bunts".
                  Hack Wilson - He was built like a beer keg and was not unfamiliar with its contents.

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                  • NA History

                    Right now I am reading Blackguards and Red Stockings about the life of the National Association. The author has written two more recent books which go back in time to cover the formation of base ball.

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                    • Originally posted by Sportkrank21 View Post
                      Right now I am reading Blackguards and Red Stockings about the life of the National Association. The author has written two more recent books which go back in time to cover the formation of base ball.
                      What does he say about if the NA was a major league or not?
                      "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
                      "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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                      • Originally posted by TonyK View Post
                        What does he say about if the NA was a major league or not?
                        In his closing paragraph he calls it the first major league. This was written in 1992 so I am not sure how strong the debate was about this.

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                        • A new book written as a tribute to the late great Harry Kalas is now available at Wawa Food Markets. "Remembering Harry Kalas" by Rich Wolfe is a keepsake book that shares behind the scenes stories about one of Philadelphia's most beloved broadcasters
                          sigpic

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                          • Reading "The Complete Game" by Ron Darling. An excellent read. Best baseball book I've read all year!
                            unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
                            unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
                            unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

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                            • Currently, I'm reading Baseball and Philosophy, edited by Eric Bronson, from 2006. Some of the chapters include one on the faith of Cubs' fans, one on umpiring well, one on the ethics of cheating and its various forms in baseball, and a "press conference" final chapter where they debate Pete Rose and the Hall, superstitious behavior in baseball and steroid use. Fantastic stuff, because I know of no other collection which addresses baseball and philosophy at all. Its worth reviewing through interlibrary loan, if nothing else.
                              Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                              A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                              Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

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                              • Satchel

                                I just finished Satchel by Larry Tye. It was an excellent study of the man and I would highly recommend it to everyone.
                                Also a quick note on Burying the Black Sox. It's author, Gene Carney, passed away this week. He will sorely be missed as an avid devotee to learning more about the scandal and, much more than that, as a person.

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