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  • The new Peter Golenbock Steinbrenner bio. Golenbock is good with the stories and has the ins to get the interviews and such. His fact-checking is little to nonexistent though - always has been.

    Claims that Roger Maris is in the Hall of Fame, says Col. Huston was a soldier and embarassingly asks why Landis didn't halt the Babe Ruth sale to the Yankees in the best interests of baseball - BTW Landis wasn't in office at the time. Those are just the things I recognized as I'm not up on Steinbrenner's life to note inconsistencies.

    Added later: just read that Denny McLain was the key to the Tigers' success in 1984.
    Last edited by Brian McKenna; 06-09-2009, 10:23 AM.

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    • Just finished Only the Ball Was White by Robert Peterson. Got that several years ago, just didn't get around to it. Enjoyable and informative book.
      "Any pitcher who throws at a batter and deliberately tries to hit him is a communist."

      - Alvin Dark

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      • Just finished Heart of the Game by S.L. Price. This is an excellent book, but a very tragic subject. It covers the sorry circumstances around the death of first base coach Mike Coolbaugh in a minor league game in Little Rock, Arkansas. Mike was hit by a foul ball late in the game as he was standing in the first base coaches box. Price does a good job of building up to that tragic moment, but also provides great insight into life in baseball's minor leagues. I highly recommend this book; it makes you think about the value of life, which we tend to take for granted as we go about our daily business.
        Hack Wilson - He was built like a beer keg and was not unfamiliar with its contents.

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        • Finally finished Robert Fitts book on Wally Yonamine, outstanding book. My main complaint is that it isn't longer, but it does seem padded with all the play by play of Yonamine's bigger games. However, it does make me wish there were more biographies about Japanese players available in English. Considering Yonamine's career made up such a big part of the development of post-War Japanese baseball, it would be wonderful to read about it from other players perspectives. Not only was he sort of the Jackie Robinson of Japanese baseball, he was also sort of an early Bo Jackson or Deion Sanders type, playing both pro football AND pro baseball.
          Clyde's Stale Cards - A blog about the international world of baseball cards.

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          • The Brooklyn Dodgers: An Informal History by Frank Graham Jr. Found a 1948 HC edition in an antique store this week. It's the first one of the Putnam team histories that I've read. Pretty good so far.

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            • Just started October 1964 by David Halberstam. I want to find out once and for all if Bob Gibson is overrated. It's keeping me awake at night.
              They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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              • Getting ready to begin Opening Day... The Story about Jackie Robinsons 1st season. Any thoughts on the book???

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                • Originally posted by scottybr7 View Post
                  Getting ready to begin Opening Day... The Story about Jackie Robinsons 1st season. Any thoughts on the book???
                  Some of it was pretty eye opening.

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                  • Originally posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
                    Just started October 1964 by David Halberstam. I want to find out once and for all if Bob Gibson is overrated. It's keeping me awake at night.
                    This book contained a story about Gibson that made me want to puke.

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                    • Originally posted by 1964Senators View Post
                      I have just finished reading Miracle Ball, which is an account of a two-year search for the home-run ball hit by Bobby Thomson in the final game of the 1951 NL playoff.
                      It's outstanding. It reads as more of a mystery than the other books written on the Dodgers-Giants playoff race and series. It has a nice ebb and flow to it, as the author tries to uncover a 55 year-old mystery.
                      The subject matter has always fascinated me. And this is a completely new perspective on the most historic (in my eyes) game in baseball history. Others may like game 6 of the 1975 or 1986 World Series, or game 7 of the 1960 World Series. But there is such a magical atmosphere regarding this game. And the search back and forth across the country for the missing ball does nothing to dispel that magic.
                      I cannot recommend this book enough.
                      I hope you like it.

                      Not a terribly long book... I read it in one day (started it at lunch and basically could not put it down.)

                      Miracle Ball is simply outstanding.
                      The indvidual who caught the ball, and why it has never surfaced? It makes perfect sense now. Instantly at top 5 baseball book for me, and an absolute must read for any fan of the Polo Grounds, The Shot Heard Round the World, or the NY Giants.
                      "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

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                      • I'm about halfway finished with George Will's 'Men At Work'. Although a bit dated, their is alot of good facts and figures in the book. Does anyone know if he wrote a followup to this book?
                        My collection of autographs: TTM Autos

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                        • Originally posted by Extra Innings View Post
                          I'm about halfway finished with George Will's 'Men At Work'. Although a bit dated, their is alot of good facts and figures in the book. Does anyone know if he wrote a followup to this book?
                          Yes, he wrote "Bunts".
                          Hack Wilson - He was built like a beer keg and was not unfamiliar with its contents.

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                          • NA History

                            Right now I am reading Blackguards and Red Stockings about the life of the National Association. The author has written two more recent books which go back in time to cover the formation of base ball.

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                            • Originally posted by Sportkrank21 View Post
                              Right now I am reading Blackguards and Red Stockings about the life of the National Association. The author has written two more recent books which go back in time to cover the formation of base ball.
                              What does he say about if the NA was a major league or not?
                              "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
                              "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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                              • Originally posted by TonyK View Post
                                What does he say about if the NA was a major league or not?
                                In his closing paragraph he calls it the first major league. This was written in 1992 so I am not sure how strong the debate was about this.

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