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  • Glory of Their Times

    This is probably something that I should've read a long time ago given it's historical significance. But hey, better late than never I suppose.

    So far it's been a great read.
    "Age is a question of mind over matter--if you don't mind, it doesn't matter."
    -Satchel Paige

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    • Originally posted by rsuriyop View Post
      This is probably something that I should've read a long time ago given it's historical significance. But hey, better late than never I suppose.

      So far it's been a great read.
      Quite probably the best baseball book I have read. Every baseball fan alive should thank Ritter for seeking out and interviewing those old ballplayers before they were all gone.

      A similar book, although not as good as Ritter's, is Voices From Cooperstown by Anthony J. Connor. He does interviews with hall of famers from all eras, but breaks the book into chapters by different titles and then has quotes from various HOFers on the issue.

      Fay Vincent also did something similar with players from the forties in The Only Game In Town. A good read but IMHO he didn't come close to what Ritter did.
      You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

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      • Also, Donald Honig did an informal "sequel" (with Ritter's blessing) to Glory of Their Times called Baseball When the Grass Was Real, featuring players from the 20's-40's. I haven't read it, but I'm currently reading his The Man In The Dugout, which is a similar style of book, only with managers instead of players. It's pretty good so far, though it's certainly not Glory of Their Times.
        Last edited by mwiggins; 07-10-2009, 07:31 AM.

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        • Also, Jerome Holtzman's No Cheering in the Pressbox is of a similar ilk. He interviewed old sports reporters rather than players or managers. It's a great book; in fact I think I prefer it over The Glory of Their Times in that it provides a different but very insightful look into the game of the early 20th century. The old reporters speak of things they probably wouldn't have reported on at the time because of the code between players, teams and sports reporters to keep the coverage between the lines. How things have changed, in that today the bulk of the reporting is what's happening off the field, not on it.
          Hack Wilson - He was built like a beer keg and was not unfamiliar with its contents.

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          • Originally posted by Sportkrank21 View Post
            I just finished Satchel by Larry Tye. It was an excellent study of the man and I would highly recommend it to everyone.
            Also a quick note on Burying the Black Sox. It's author, Gene Carney, passed away this week. He will sorely be missed as an avid devotee to learning more about the scandal and, much more than that, as a person.
            I'm picking up Satchel as well, but will wait until I finish "After Many A Summer" by Robert Murphy. It's about the Dodgers AND Giants leaving New York, and is a gripping read. Honestly,. I've read, researched and talked about this subject so much that I thought I was an expert, but Murphy's book is really full of things I haven't read anywhere else, and tremendously well-written.
            "With most great players on other teams, you notice how great they are, but when they become teammates and you see them everyday, you notice the flaws. It is exactly the opposite with George Brett." - Jim Sundberg

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            • The Summer Game by Roger Angell.

              I'm really enjoying it. However it seems to be taking me forever to read it.
              If I had only spent a tenth of the time studying Physics that I spent learning Star Wars and Baseball trivia, I would have won the Nobel Prize.

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              • The Last Commissioner: A Baseball Valentine by Fay Vincent. Pretty good, a quick read. Nice insight to the Rose situation.
                Enough already! Let's get Quiz and Frank White into the Hall Of Fame ASAP!!! Go ROYALS!!!

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                • Originally posted by Allie Fox View Post
                  The Summer Game by Roger Angell.

                  I'm really enjoying it. However it seems to be taking me forever to read it.
                  Take your time and savor it
                  3 6 10 21 29 31 35 41 42 44 47

                  "To this day, and forever, no one will ever be able to make sense of the game’s record book, now smeared with phony honors. It’s unfixable." - Thomas Boswell

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                  • Yesterday I picked up The Baseball Economist for a clam at Waldenbooks. I plan on starting it if I can ever finish The Summer Game.
                    If I had only spent a tenth of the time studying Physics that I spent learning Star Wars and Baseball trivia, I would have won the Nobel Prize.

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                    • I'm re-reading The Glory of Their Times for probably the 10th time, but the first time in about five years. Still the best baseball book ever. I'm enjoying it this time as much as the first time.
                      They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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                      • Finally bought Ball Four. A lot of people have been suggesting this book to me for a long time. I'm only 22 so I hadn't heard of it until a couple years ago, it's probably one of the funniest things I've read ever.
                        Don't think. It Can only hurt the ball club.

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                        • The New York Giants: An Informal History of a Great Baseball Club by Frank Graham Jr. I really like Graham's writing style. He takes what could be a fairly dry history, and gives it a narative flow that keeps you turning the pages as the years fly by. The book was published in 1952, and I'm just to the point where the Giants have signed a young Negro Leager named Willie Mays. Hmmm...sounds promising.
                          Last edited by mwiggins; 08-19-2009, 07:46 PM.

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                          • Waiting for Luckiest Man, To Everything a Season, The Greatest Ballpark Ever and Land of the Giants.

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                            • Originally posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
                              I'm re-reading The Glory of Their Times for probably the 10th time, but the first time in about five years. Still the best baseball book ever. I'm enjoying it this time as much as the first time.
                              Agreed. One of the very few books I have ever re-read, and you're right - just as entertaining the second time around as it was the first.

                              Presently reading Crazy '08 (Cait has few mistakes here and there, but a writing style I enjoy), and also The Boys of Summer. Kahn can be a bit confusing the way he jumps around and sequences things, but a terrific writer and book.
                              You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

                              Comment


                              • Recent Baseball books

                                I'm just about done with As They See 'Em by Bruce Weber, the book about umpires and their craft that just came out a few months ago. It started off fairly sluggishly, but for some reason after about 1/3 of the way through, you won't want to put it down. The book points things out that even the most astute baseball fan doesn't easily notice, and from the get-go will have you watching the game in a different way than ever before. It feels like one of those books that you're almost sad to finish because you enjoy reading it so much.

                                A few weeks ago I also read Odd Man Out, the minor league memoir written by Yale grad Matt McCarthy, in which he chronicles the 2002 season spent as a pitcher in rookie ball in the Anaheim Angels' system. I absolutely plowed through that one, it reads so vividly and quickly. Aside of the funny stories you'd expect from a group of Single-A ballplayers in their first ventures into the professional ranks, the book brings to life the dilemma of a minor leaguer whose own teammates are his fiercest competition. I'd recommend this one especially for anyone going on vacation (i.e. looking for something to read on a plane or on the beach), because it can be knocked out in 3-4 days no problem.

                                I'm thinking about reading the Munson biography written by Marty Appel that just came out, has anyone read or started to read that one yet?

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