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  • Joe Posnaski's Big Red Machine was an even better read of the 1975 season and WS, although told entirely from the Reds' point of view. I found some stuff in Long Ball - particularly all the Casey Stengel stuff - really distracting.

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    • 1921, the new Joe Cronin bio, the new Willie Mays book, the new book on Old Hoss Radbourne - all beckon to me.

      Any recommendations?

      Thanks.

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      • Originally posted by LDYanks16 View Post
        Thanks for your response. I do agree that the question under which Odd Man Out has come does take something away from the book, but fortunately I didn't find out about the alleged inaccuracies until after I'd finished it.

        Overall, it's still worth the read. Anytime an "inside the locker room" or "inside the life" book is written, challenges to its accuracy are pretty much to be expected. Even if McCarthy did take some liberties with the book, it does not put much of a damper on it for me, because the most intriguing points still stood.

        Embellishing a story about a pitcher being taken out of a game for refusing to throw at a batter, or exaggerating the hijinks of the Latin American players, etc. may just have been necessary to drive home the "reader experience." McCarthy had almost a year's time in pro ball to forge into his mind that experience, while the reader only has 300-some pages to do so.

        It's similar to how a screenplay may only have time for one scene to drive home a point that ideally would require 3-4 scenes, but since no one wants a 4-hour movie, the one allotted scene is made more intense in order to stick it in the viewer's mind.

        Even if it's not 100% real, the book still took me into a world I only thought I knew about - the bus rides, the organizational pressure, the rivalries and resentment between teammates, the meager pay - it all gave me an ever greater appreciation for just how good you have to be, and how tough it really is, the make it to the show.
        I was planning to read this but can't now. Any book that purports to be non-fiction but where the author can be demonstrated to take liberties with the truth to make a story more interesting simply doesn't interest me.

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        • Originally posted by catcher24 View Post

          Fay Vincent also did something similar with players from the forties in The Only Game In Town. A good read but IMHO he didn't come close to what Ritter did.
          I thought this book was reallllly boring. Basically it sounded like Vincent had people record some memories, had them typed up, and then published. There's no sense of an interlocutor directing the accounts, trying to bring things out, probing, etc. This book could have been much more than it was.

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          • just started reading the Bullpen Gospels by Dirk Hayhurst
            MySpace Codes

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            • Originally posted by BaseballinDC View Post
              1921, the new Joe Cronin bio, the new Willie Mays book, the new book on Old Hoss Radbourne - all beckon to me.

              Any recommendations?

              Thanks.
              The new Willie Mays book was pretty uninteresting.

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              • Just got done reading Fred Liebs book about Connie Mack, now Im off to the best of Baseball Digest, or something like that. Then Ill be reading the new Old Hoss Radbourn book.
                "I don't like to sound egotistical, but every time I stepped up to the plate with a bat in my hands, I couldn't help but feel sorry for the pitcher."
                -Rogers Hornsby-

                "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring."
                -Rogers Hornsby-

                Just a note to all the active members of BBF, I consider all of you the smartest baseball people I have ever communicated with and love everyday I am on here. Thank you all!

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                • "The Yankee Years" Torre and Verducci.

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                  • Finished reading last week, "Rumor in Town." Story about Babe Dahlgren, the player who replaced Lou Gehrig. Excellant read. Started reading "October Men" by Roger Kahn. Next should be "Christy Mathewson" by Ray Robinson. Read it before, very good, with a few mistakes here and there. Happ Reading!

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                    • Quote Originally Posted by catcher24 View Post

                      Fay Vincent also did something similar with players from the forties in The Only Game In Town. A good read but IMHO he didn't come close to what Ritter did.
                      I thought this book was reallllly boring. Basically it sounded like Vincent had people record some memories, had them typed up, and then published. There's no sense of an interlocutor directing the accounts, trying to bring things out, probing, etc. This book could have been much more than it was.
                      Agreed. I didn't find it as boring as you apparently did. Some of the info the players put forth was quite interesting. I do agree that it could have been improved dramatically with some additional editing, though. And as I said - it's not nearly as good as Ritter's "The Glory of Their Times".
                      You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

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                      • Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
                        The new Willie Mays book was pretty uninteresting.
                        I found it somewhat interesting, but have always been a huge Mays fan. I will say I'm not as much a fan now as I was prior to reading the book because it doesn't always cast him in the best of light, even though the author actually attempts to do so. In other words, some of the things Mays did just weren't very nice, even though the author tries to make them sound OK. It's not a book I would have purchased myself and if you're not a real Mays fan it could be a very long read.
                        You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

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                        • Originally posted by theAmazingMet View Post
                          Also reading "The Complete Game" by Ron Darling (at home) it is an interesting read into the mind of a professional ballplayer, as Darling takes us into the thinking mans part of pitching, and what goes through a pitchers mind. Both the mundane (is there a secret tunnel to the bullpen? or should I cut across the field) and decisive (how to work out of a jam in the World Series). It is also a very good book. Both are about 300-350 pages, but are quick reads.
                          The Darling book is only 255 pages. I'll read it after I finish Veeck- As In Wreck.

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                          • There's so much more to doing a good interview book. Glory of their Times is the A No.1 book of the type, and it is NOT a transcription of the actual interviews, at all. {Tapes of the interviews are available, and fascinating.)

                            Ritter didn't create his subjects' memories, but he made them resonate. He made them memorable for all of us.

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                            • Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
                              There's so much more to doing a good interview book. Glory of their Times is the A No.1 book of the type, and it is NOT a transcription of the actual interviews, at all. {Tapes of the interviews are available, and fascinating.)

                              Ritter didn't create his subjects' memories, but he made them resonate. He made them memorable for all of us.
                              My wife picked up Glory of their Times for me a few weeks ago at the Smithsonian. I just finished up spring semester and just started reading it yesterday. I've gotten through the first two chapters / people and I am very impressed at how this book is layed out and reads. Your description is spot on westsidegrounds!

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                              • His description was definitely spot on. The best baseball book, without a doubt, that I have read.
                                You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

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