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  • Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
    The new Willie Mays book was pretty uninteresting.
    I found it somewhat interesting, but have always been a huge Mays fan. I will say I'm not as much a fan now as I was prior to reading the book because it doesn't always cast him in the best of light, even though the author actually attempts to do so. In other words, some of the things Mays did just weren't very nice, even though the author tries to make them sound OK. It's not a book I would have purchased myself and if you're not a real Mays fan it could be a very long read.
    You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

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    • Originally posted by theAmazingMet View Post
      Also reading "The Complete Game" by Ron Darling (at home) it is an interesting read into the mind of a professional ballplayer, as Darling takes us into the thinking mans part of pitching, and what goes through a pitchers mind. Both the mundane (is there a secret tunnel to the bullpen? or should I cut across the field) and decisive (how to work out of a jam in the World Series). It is also a very good book. Both are about 300-350 pages, but are quick reads.
      The Darling book is only 255 pages. I'll read it after I finish Veeck- As In Wreck.

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      • There's so much more to doing a good interview book. Glory of their Times is the A No.1 book of the type, and it is NOT a transcription of the actual interviews, at all. {Tapes of the interviews are available, and fascinating.)

        Ritter didn't create his subjects' memories, but he made them resonate. He made them memorable for all of us.

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        • Originally posted by westsidegrounds View Post
          There's so much more to doing a good interview book. Glory of their Times is the A No.1 book of the type, and it is NOT a transcription of the actual interviews, at all. {Tapes of the interviews are available, and fascinating.)

          Ritter didn't create his subjects' memories, but he made them resonate. He made them memorable for all of us.
          My wife picked up Glory of their Times for me a few weeks ago at the Smithsonian. I just finished up spring semester and just started reading it yesterday. I've gotten through the first two chapters / people and I am very impressed at how this book is layed out and reads. Your description is spot on westsidegrounds!

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          • His description was definitely spot on. The best baseball book, without a doubt, that I have read.
            You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

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            • "Juiced" by some guy named Canseco. It's a trip, at the least....

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              • I just finished The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Detroit Tigers. I'm currently reading Ball Four. I haven't gotten the chance to do that before, and I'm enjoying it so far.
                The Evil Empire shall strike back again!
                http://litbases.wordpress.com/

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                • Originally posted by BaronSamedi View Post
                  I just finished The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: Detroit Tigers. I'm currently reading Ball Four. I haven't gotten the chance to do that before, and I'm enjoying it so far.
                  I finally read Ball Four about five years ago or so. Great book. I really enjoyed it, and for an older fan like me it also brought back a lot of memories. You'll see where I got my signature from, too. I hope you have a copy of the book with the additional material in, where Bouton talks a bit about his later comeback attempt with the Braves.
                  You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by catcher24 View Post
                    I finally read Ball Four about five years ago or so. Great book. I really enjoyed it, and for an older fan like me it also brought back a lot of memories. You'll see where I got my signature from, too. I hope you have a copy of the book with the additional material in, where Bouton talks a bit about his later comeback attempt with the Braves.
                    It's the 20th anniversary edition from 1990, with a new epilogue.

                    Anyway, I'm lately not having the time I'd like to work on my blog, so my latest review should be up by Monday at the latest.

                    So does anyone have any suggestions? I'm planning to read Sandy Koufax: A Lefty's Legacy once I'm done with Ball Four. I'm also interested in books about the San Francisco (or New York) Giants - one that talk about the team and not focused on the greatness of John McGraw, Willie Mays, Mel Ott, or whomever. Can anyone think of good books about teams we don't hear about very often? The Expos, the Rockies, the Blue Jays, or others like that?
                    Last edited by BaronSamedi; 04-23-2010, 09:14 AM.
                    The Evil Empire shall strike back again!
                    http://litbases.wordpress.com/

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                    • I am currently reading "Heroes of the Negro Leagues" by Mark Chiarello and Jack Morelli.

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                      • It's the 20th anniversary edition from 1990, with a new epilogue.
                        Yup, that's it then.

                        As for books, you might try to find a copy of The Spirit of St. Louis, which is a history of the Cardinals and Browns by Peter Golenbock. It was originally published in 2000. I was lucky enough to pick one up at the local library's book sale for $3.00. Haven't had the opportunity to read it yet, but it looks very interesting. However, I ran a quick search at Amazon and they show 16 new from $1.20, and 27 used from 75 cents! THIS LINK will take you to the page where it is listed (third book listed) if you're interested.
                        You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

                        Comment


                        • I have to also vouch for Baseball Eccentrics, by the awesome Bill "Spaceman" Lee. It's a celebration of all of the baseball people who had a few screws loose. Some greats are mentioned: Yogi Berra, Dizzy Dean, Satchel Paige, Ted Williams, and a lot of others were crazier than we would think.
                          The Evil Empire shall strike back again!
                          http://litbases.wordpress.com/

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                          • I picked up A Game of Inches and We Played The Game at my local Barnes & Noble this evening. The latter was in the Bargain Priced section for $6.49.

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                            • Originally posted by stejay View Post
                              just started reading the Bullpen Gospels by Dirk Hayhurst
                              I was lucky enough to be able to get down to Toronto before the Jays' home opener a few weeks ago to attend a book reading/signing with Hayhurst. He was really great, reading 5 or 6 pages from the book and then taking questions for half an hour or so. Everything that's written about the guy is true - really down to earth, funny etc... And he signed books for everyone there - it took him close to an hour!!!

                              I read the book in about 48 hours after the signing, it's one of the better baseball books I've read (although I haven't read Ball Four). Highly recommended.

                              Here are a couple links, one a video with Hayhurst talking about the book, and the other from one of my favourite Jays blogs describing the signing event:

                              http://videos.torontosun.com/archive...ok/77637786001

                              http://www.drunkjaysfans.com/2010/04...rst-still.html
                              WAMCO!

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                              • Last baseball read was Lee Lowenfish's Imperfect Diamond (my review can be read at: http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/ar...rfect-diamond/)

                                Currently reading 1921, which was the first season of baseball as its currently played in many ways (emphasis on home runs, clean balls, no spitters, etc) not to mention the rise of the New York dominance in the A.L. SUPERB BOOK - a model of how to recreate a season.

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