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  • I'm just reading Paul Dickson's "The unwritten rules of baseball" and I'm really enjoying it. Beats browsing the new Beckett in the john. lol.
    I guess most fans are aware of those rules, so it's nothing new, but being relatively new to the game I had a few good laughs.
    Last edited by GoTribe; 05-13-2010, 04:52 AM.

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    • "The Game From Where I stand" by Doug Glanville.
      Very good! And he was at the cubs game today: he sang 'take me out to the ballgame'.

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      • "The Greatest Ballpark Ever" up, "Haunted Baseball" on deck, "The Boys of Summer" in the hole.

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        • Originally posted by DarioMet View Post
          "The Greatest Ballpark Ever" up, "Haunted Baseball" on deck, "The Boys of Summer" in the hole.
          Can't vouch for the first two, not having read them. However, I'm pretty sure you'll enjoy "The Boys of Summer". Kahn did a great job with that book. I think he does go a little overboard in his idolization of Jackie Robinson and his rather harsh treatment of Billy Cox, but I think that's a reflection of his own personal beliefs. A really good book regardless.
          You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

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          • Originally posted by catcher24 View Post
            Can't vouch for the first two, not having read them. However, I'm pretty sure you'll enjoy "The Boys of Summer". Kahn did a great job with that book. I think he does go a little overboard in his idolization of Jackie Robinson and his rather harsh treatment of Billy Cox, but I think that's a reflection of his own personal beliefs. A really good book regardless.
            Thanks, maybe I could change my batting order

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            • Originally posted by stejay View Post
              just started reading the Bullpen Gospels by Dirk Hayhurst
              Me too. I was excited I found a bookstore with it here in South Korea. On deck is Living on the Black by John Feinstein
              Baseball Journeyman

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              • Now up: Timothy Gay, "Tris Speaker"; on deck: "Baseball Between the Numbers"; in the hole: "The Glory Of Their Times". The gameplan is to continue the rally with Donald Honig's "Baseball When The Grass Was Real".

                Baseball history is much, much cooler when you are older. The stat books seem more profound when younger. Just fyi.
                Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

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                • If you haven't read The Glory of Their Times yet you'll love it. The best baseball book I have read, and one of the very few books of any kind I've read more than once.
                  You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

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                  • Originally posted by catcher24 View Post
                    If you haven't read The Glory of Their Times yet you'll love it. The best baseball book I have read, and one of the very few books of any kind I've read more than once.
                    I agree with that endorsement. I've read it probably ten times, and each time is as enjoyable as the first. It's a treasure.
                    They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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                    • I just started "Munson: The Life and Death of a Yankee Captain" by Marty Appel

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                      • I've been reading a book about the 1960 Presidential campaign. It's not a baseball book but it has an interesting chapter about how each of the candidates tried to win the support of Jackie Robinson.. Robinson supported Richard Nixon but the chapter shows how Robinson's regard for Nixon eroded pretty quickly because of Nixon's response to a controversy involving Martin Luther King Jr.

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                        • Burying The Black Sox by Gene Carney. This is an excellent (if sometimes hard to follow) book that presents much new information regarding the 1919 World Series fix. I've read about half and am already convinced that Buck Weaver and Shoeless Joe, along with possibly Happy Felsch, should have been reinstated and permitted to resume their careers. There could even be an argument made for the rest, based on baseball's prior handling of similar - although not as high profile - as the Fix. Much of the information Carney presents came to light after Eight Men Out was written. Extremely interesting and enlightening.
                          You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

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                          • Originally posted by catcher24 View Post
                            Burying The Black Sox by Gene Carney. This is an excellent (if sometimes hard to follow) book that presents much new information regarding the 1919 World Series fix. I've read about half and am already convinced that Buck Weaver and Shoeless Joe, along with possibly Happy Felsch, should have been reinstated and permitted to resume their careers. There could even be an argument made for the rest, based on baseball's prior handling of similar - although not as high profile - as the Fix. Much of the information Carney presents came to light after Eight Men Out was written. Extremely interesting and enlightening.
                            I've started this book three times and hoperfully will get through it someday. The non-linear structure makes it really hard for me to read it. i interpret Carney's thesis to be that the cover-up was as bad as the fix. If that's true then I agree with Carney. I'm not sure that he'll be able to change my mind about Joe Jackson (or any of the Black Sox). I noticed that he used Robert Cotrell's book on the 1920 seasonas a source, but did not mention the news accounts from the 1919 World Series that had reporters questioning Jackson's defensive play (particularly his positioning in the field). This raised a red flag for me about his portrayal of Jackson.

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                            • Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post
                              I've started this book three times and hoperfully will get through it someday. The non-linear structure makes it really hard for me to read it. i interpret Carney's thesis to be that the cover-up was as bad as the fix. If that's true then I agree with Carney. I'm not sure that he'll be able to change my mind about Joe Jackson (or any of the Black Sox). I noticed that he used Robert Cotrell's book on the 1920 seasonas a source, but did not mention the news accounts from the 1919 World Series that had reporters questioning Jackson's defensive play (particularly his positioning in the field). This raised a red flag for me about his portrayal of Jackson.
                              Many, many inconsistincies in statements made by the players and by the owners during the entire duration of this incident. What a lot of people aren't aware of is that Jackson and Felsch (and maybe one other Sox player) sued Comiskey for breach of contract in 1924. A lot of evidence came out at this trial that was never presented to the original grand jury investigating the World Series scandal. The jury in the 1924 trial, most of whom were NOT baseball fans and some of whom had never even heard about the Series fix, found in favor of the players. When you read the entire book, and see the tremendous lengths Comiskey went to to keep the entire thing under wraps, it will amaze you, if not change your mind. There is very strong evidence that Jackson was never involved, and in fact went to Comiskey before the series started with evidence of a possible fix. Others also had such evidence, and both Comiskey and Ban Johnson were quite aware that something might be afoot. The main problem was how deeply gamblers were involved in the entire sport of baseball at the time, and no one could prove a fix for sure. The story is really amazing. Once you get through the first couple of chapters things get a bit more clear and it's worth the effort.
                              You see, you spend a good deal of your life gripping a baseball and in the end it turns out that it was the other way around all the time. J. Bouton

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by catcher24 View Post
                                Many, many inconsistincies in statements made by the players and by the owners during the entire duration of this incident. What a lot of people aren't aware of is that Jackson and Felsch (and maybe one other Sox player) sued Comiskey for breach of contract in 1924. A lot of evidence came out at this trial that was never presented to the original grand jury investigating the World Series scandal. The jury in the 1924 trial, most of whom were NOT baseball fans and some of whom had never even heard about the Series fix, found in favor of the players. When you read the entire book, and see the tremendous lengths Comiskey went to to keep the entire thing under wraps, it will amaze you, if not change your mind. There is very strong evidence that Jackson was never involved, and in fact went to Comiskey before the series started with evidence of a possible fix. Others also had such evidence, and both Comiskey and Ban Johnson were quite aware that something might be afoot. The main problem was how deeply gamblers were involved in the entire sport of baseball at the time, and no one could prove a fix for sure. The story is really amazing. Once you get through the first couple of chapters things get a bit more clear and it's worth the effort.
                                Actually I don't think I'd find Comiskey's involvement in a cover-up to be amazing at all. He was obviously trying to protect his investment in his team. It woud take a lot for me to revise my opinion on Jackson. When I was younger I thought he was innocent, but as time has gone on and I've read more about it, I think he was in on the fix and actively participated in it. I don't know if it was out of greed or fear, but I suspect it was a combination of both.

                                I'm going to try to get through this book later in the year. I don't like the non-linear method that Carney uses. It would be OK for a novel, but I don't think it works for non-fiction.

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