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  • Originally posted by hairmetalfreek View Post
    My favorite is probably Mathewson's article on jinxes. Maybe a bit too long-winded, but entertaining nonetheless.

    This is a newly-published edition, due out in paperback tomorrow by Lyons Press. But I doubt the content inside has changed much if any.
    I wonder if the Mathewson article is the same as Chapter 11 is in his Pitching in a Pinch, available online here:

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/33291...h.htm#Page_230
    "You can hate a man for many reasons. Color is not one one of them."--Pee Wee Reese

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    • It is not, perhaps, technically correct to state that I am reading it right now, but Vol. 7 of Base Ball: A Journal of the Early Game is now out. This periodical from McFarland & Co. Publishers used to come out semi-annually. As of this issue, it is now just an annual. I probably won't get around to reading it for a couple months. Articles include:

      Split Season: The National League in 1892, by Charles C. Alexander
      The Base Ball Convention of 1857, by Richard Hershberger
      Jimmy Callahan: He Covered All the Bases in Chicago, by Art Ahrens
      Eadward Muybridge and Baseball-in-Motion, by Rob Edelman
      Bud Fowler--A Knight of the Diamond, a Knight of the Razor, by Hugh MacDougall
      Bud Fowler--Playwright, by Hugh MacDougall
      William Shuttleworth: The Father of Canadian Baseball, by William Humber
      The Sam Barkley Case, by David Ball with David Nemec
      A Permanent Institution: The Base Ball Season of 1863, by Robert Tholkes
      "A Puritan Sunday": Base Ball and Blue Laws in Walla Walla, Washington, by Terry Gottschall (and it is for off-the-wall articles like this that I subscribe to the journal! Where else will you read about Walla Walla baseball?)
      Frank Merriwell: A Hero for a Bygone Era, by Rob Edelman
      Baseball Goes East: The 1876 San Francisco Centennial's Magical Mystery Tour, by Angus Macfarlane.

      If you are interested in Pre-1920 baseball, this journal is a treasure!
      "You can hate a man for many reasons. Color is not one one of them."--Pee Wee Reese

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      • I just finished reading "Of Mikes and Men" by Braves broadcaster Pete "The Professor" Van Wieren. He is a gentleman and he made games very enjoyable. He lived through major changes in media coverage. After he retired he was named to the Braves HOF. In his acceptance speech he said "I have worked for eleven different executive producers over the years, I'd like to thank ten of them.":applaud:


        BTW, I'm kind of new here. Please meet my avatar, Kid Sheleen.
        "The key to being a good manager is keeping the people who hate me away from those who are still undecided."
        Casey Stengel

        "Pitchers are just a different breed. They're like a tick on a dog; they're worthless for four days but then they have to suck blood on that fifth day."
        John Kruk

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        • Originally posted by mithogo View Post
          I just finished reading "Of Mikes and Men" by Braves broadcaster Pete "The Professor" Van Wieren. He is a gentleman and he made games very enjoyable. He lived through major changes in media coverage. After he retired he was named to the Braves HOF. In his acceptance speech he said "I have worked for eleven different executive producers over the years, I'd like to thank ten of them.":applaud:


          BTW, I'm kind of new here. Please meet my avatar, Kid Sheleen.
          I picked that up not too long ago and can't wait to get to it. Being a huge Braves fan who grew up listening to him on TBS, I'm very excited to read it.
          Baseball Journeyman

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          • Finally getting around to Wild and Outside about the Northern League. So far it is much better than Slouching Toward Fargo and has really peaked my interest in older independent leagues/teams.
            Baseball Journeyman

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            • Just finished National Pastime: Why America Plays Baseball and the Rest of the World Plays Soccer.

              It's a comparative economic history of baseball and soccer.

              Now I'm currently on THE BOOK.

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              • "Just Out Of Reach: The 1980s New York Yankees" by Greg Prato.

                This is a new book that is a pure oral history of Yankee players of the 80s recalling the only decade they didn't win a championship. This book really fills a void in Yankee history that hasn't been told enough though the author's style isn't refined enough in that he needed to give us some better editing and should have written some good connective narrative to flesh things out a bit (the author has previously done oral histories of the 1980s NY Jets and NY Islanders).

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                • Originally posted by epaddon View Post
                  "Just Out Of Reach: The 1980s New York Yankees" by Greg Prato.

                  This is a new book that is a pure oral history of Yankee players of the 80s recalling the only decade they didn't win a championship. This book really fills a void in Yankee history that hasn't been told enough though the author's style isn't refined enough in that he needed to give us some better editing and should have written some good connective narrative to flesh things out a bit (the author has previously done oral histories of the 1980s NY Jets and NY Islanders).
                  Sounds interesting. Thanks for the heads up.
                  Check out my Canadian baseball history blog called "Cooperstowners in Canada": http://www.kevinglew.wordpress.com

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                  • Read "Tales from the Deadball Era" by Mark S. Halfon last week. Enjoyed it quite a bit, especially all the shenanigans that would not be tolerated today.

                    Just started "Brooks" by Doug Wilson, enjoyable so far.
                    The Writer's Journey

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                    • Just finished "bigger than the game" by dirk hayhurst...ever since reading the "bullpen gospels" I have been hooked...does not compare to the previous mentioned one, but deals with a lot of darkness...great section on his rehab time at dr james andrews place

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                      • 1. Where Nobody Knows Your Name: Life In the Minor Leagues of Baseball by John Feinstein

                        A book focusing on several players in AAA back in 2012. Chris Schwinden of the Mets and others like Nate McLouth appear.

                        2. Wins, Losses, and Empty Seats: How Baseball Outlasted the Great Depression by David George Surdam

                        Focuses on MLB in the Great Depression, how teams cut salaries and made changes to the game to stay afloat.
                        The Mets have the best, smartest fans in baseball.

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                        • Originally posted by Blue387 View Post
                          1. Where Nobody Knows Your Name: Life In the Minor Leagues of Baseball by John Feinstein

                          A book focusing on several players in AAA back in 2012. Chris Schwinden of the Mets and others like Nate McLouth appear.

                          2. Wins, Losses, and Empty Seats: How Baseball Outlasted the Great Depression by David George Surdam

                          Focuses on MLB in the Great Depression, how teams cut salaries and made changes to the game to stay afloat.
                          Hows the feinstein book?

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                          • I'm currently reading Put It In the Book!: A Half-Century of Mets Mania by Howie Rose.

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                            • Originally posted by Cap78 View Post
                              Hows the feinstein book?
                              I like it. It's a book focusing on the life of AAA players, Durham Bulls manager Charlie Montoya and an umpire. They give a chapter to guys like Brett Tomko, Nate McLouth, John Lindsey and Chris Schwinden, who bounced around the waiver wire in 2012.
                              The Mets have the best, smartest fans in baseball.

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                              • http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/met...ntry-1.1752193
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