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  • Originally posted by jsontag View Post
    Eyeshade, The same is true when it comes to football, maybe even a lot worse than baseball. The NFL Network and Sports Center seem to think the NFL stared in the 1990's, or with the Super Bowl era. Seems most fans today don't read and al, they care about is fantasy football. The NFL is really bad in promoting its history and there are not a lot of us who want to know, read, and study the game. I do and I'm also one who likes to do the same with baseball as I believe one should know the history of the game to have a better understanding of the game today, if that makes any sense.
    Makes perfect sense to me. I work for the Indians in a game-day capacity. With the exception of one or two crew members the rest of the folks are pretty sure Indians history started with the '90s team...and there was a guy named Bob Feller. Oh yeah, Doby and Paige...but don't ask them anything about them, they just know the names. I got into a discussion with one guy, who is seen as a sports nut by the rest of the crew, about Thome having a statue and Speaker not having ANY in-park recognition apart from a photo by a hot dog stand (honest). The guy just didn't know who Speaker was and still tried to convince me that Thome was "one of the all-time greats", but couldn't tell me anything other than power numbers.
    I do get the sense that many millennials just aren't interested in anything that happened before their birth.
    Oh, I'm also reading a biography of Hal Trosky....talk about a guy that gets 'no respect'...Wow!

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    • Originally posted by Eyeshade View Post
      Makes perfect sense to me. I work for the Indians in a game-day capacity. With the exception of one or two crew members the rest of the folks are pretty sure Indians history started with the '90s team...and there was a guy named Bob Feller. Oh yeah, Doby and Paige...but don't ask them anything about them, they just know the names. I got into a discussion with one guy, who is seen as a sports nut by the rest of the crew, about Thome having a statue and Speaker not having ANY in-park recognition apart from a photo by a hot dog stand (honest). The guy just didn't know who Speaker was and still tried to convince me that Thome was "one of the all-time greats", but couldn't tell me anything other than power numbers.
      I do get the sense that many millennials just aren't interested in anything that happened before their birth.
      Oh, I'm also reading a biography of Hal Trosky....talk about a guy that gets 'no respect'...Wow!
      Wow, you work for the Indians in a game-day capacity. That's pretty cool, man. That is pretty sad that with the exception of one or two crew members that the rest are clueless to when the Indians history started? The kids today or casual fans of football, think that Tom Brady and Peyton Manning are the best two QB's to ever play the game. They have no clue who Otto Graham, Sammy Baugh, Johnny Unitas, and maybe Joe Montana are. I remember when I was a kid in the 1970's, I'm 50 now, that I wanted to learn all about football in the 1920's, 1930's, 1940's, and 1950's. My grandfather was born in the Bronx in 1920 and he told me stories of when he was a kid going to the Polo Grounds and also going to Yankees games and seeing Ruth, Gehrig, Dimaggio. That is why I have been a lifelong Yankees fan as my grandfather was. It's sad that the great Yankees teams from the past about the only player people still know is Babe Ruth.
      I', reading a book on the 1928 Yankees at the moment.
      Axes grind and maces clash!

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      • Just started reading "Willie Mays the Life, the Legend" by James S. Hirsch. Only on the second chapter but so far pretty interesting. It was a bestseller and a notable book of the year from the New York Times Book Review.
        The saddest day of the year is the day that baseball season ends.

        On October 8, 1956, in game 5 of the 1956 World Series, Don Larsen of the New York Yankees, threw a perfect game against the Brooklyn Dodgers.

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        • Bumping this - anyone read anything during the pandemic they enjoyed?

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          • Re-reading Lords of the Realm by John Helyar.
            "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
            "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
            "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
            "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

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            • Gotta read "Stars and Strikes" by Dan Epstein. Loved the first one, and he's also become a friend. Haven't gotten to it yet but I will.
              Found in a fortune cookie On Thursday, August 18th, 2005: "Hard words break no bones, Kind words butter no parsnips."

              1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988 2017?

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              • Reading We Played the Game, which I'm really enjoying. It's interviews with players from all teams by each season from 1947 - 1964. Provides excellent insights into how each season unfolded during that Golden Age of Baseball.

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                • One book I have that I should read again is Split Season 1981

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