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What Are You Reading Right Now?

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  • AstrosFan
    started a topic What Are You Reading Right Now?

    What Are You Reading Right Now?

    Baseball books only, if you're not reading one, don't post.

    For me: Pitching in a Pinch by Christy Mathewson with John Wheeler.

  • Dutch
    replied
    Just started reading "Willie Mays the Life, the Legend" by James S. Hirsch. Only on the second chapter but so far pretty interesting. It was a bestseller and a notable book of the year from the New York Times Book Review.

    Leave a comment:


  • jsontag
    replied
    Originally posted by Eyeshade View Post
    Makes perfect sense to me. I work for the Indians in a game-day capacity. With the exception of one or two crew members the rest of the folks are pretty sure Indians history started with the '90s team...and there was a guy named Bob Feller. Oh yeah, Doby and Paige...but don't ask them anything about them, they just know the names. I got into a discussion with one guy, who is seen as a sports nut by the rest of the crew, about Thome having a statue and Speaker not having ANY in-park recognition apart from a photo by a hot dog stand (honest). The guy just didn't know who Speaker was and still tried to convince me that Thome was "one of the all-time greats", but couldn't tell me anything other than power numbers.
    I do get the sense that many millennials just aren't interested in anything that happened before their birth.
    Oh, I'm also reading a biography of Hal Trosky....talk about a guy that gets 'no respect'...Wow!
    Wow, you work for the Indians in a game-day capacity. That's pretty cool, man. That is pretty sad that with the exception of one or two crew members that the rest are clueless to when the Indians history started? The kids today or casual fans of football, think that Tom Brady and Peyton Manning are the best two QB's to ever play the game. They have no clue who Otto Graham, Sammy Baugh, Johnny Unitas, and maybe Joe Montana are. I remember when I was a kid in the 1970's, I'm 50 now, that I wanted to learn all about football in the 1920's, 1930's, 1940's, and 1950's. My grandfather was born in the Bronx in 1920 and he told me stories of when he was a kid going to the Polo Grounds and also going to Yankees games and seeing Ruth, Gehrig, Dimaggio. That is why I have been a lifelong Yankees fan as my grandfather was. It's sad that the great Yankees teams from the past about the only player people still know is Babe Ruth.
    I', reading a book on the 1928 Yankees at the moment.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eyeshade
    replied
    Originally posted by jsontag View Post
    Eyeshade, The same is true when it comes to football, maybe even a lot worse than baseball. The NFL Network and Sports Center seem to think the NFL stared in the 1990's, or with the Super Bowl era. Seems most fans today don't read and al, they care about is fantasy football. The NFL is really bad in promoting its history and there are not a lot of us who want to know, read, and study the game. I do and I'm also one who likes to do the same with baseball as I believe one should know the history of the game to have a better understanding of the game today, if that makes any sense.
    Makes perfect sense to me. I work for the Indians in a game-day capacity. With the exception of one or two crew members the rest of the folks are pretty sure Indians history started with the '90s team...and there was a guy named Bob Feller. Oh yeah, Doby and Paige...but don't ask them anything about them, they just know the names. I got into a discussion with one guy, who is seen as a sports nut by the rest of the crew, about Thome having a statue and Speaker not having ANY in-park recognition apart from a photo by a hot dog stand (honest). The guy just didn't know who Speaker was and still tried to convince me that Thome was "one of the all-time greats", but couldn't tell me anything other than power numbers.
    I do get the sense that many millennials just aren't interested in anything that happened before their birth.
    Oh, I'm also reading a biography of Hal Trosky....talk about a guy that gets 'no respect'...Wow!

    Leave a comment:


  • jsontag
    replied
    Originally posted by Eyeshade View Post
    As far as people reading, all I can say is I find a lot more fans interested in fantasy baseball and Sportscenter than in baseball history or classic baseball fiction. Sad.
    Eyeshade, The same is true when it comes to football, maybe even a lot worse than baseball. The NFL Network and Sports Center seem to think the NFL stared in the 1990's, or with the Super Bowl era. Seems most fans today don't read and al, they care about is fantasy football. The NFL is really bad in promoting its history and there are not a lot of us who want to know, read, and study the game. I do and I'm also one who likes to do the same with baseball as I believe one should know the history of the game to have a better understanding of the game today, if that makes any sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eyeshade
    replied
    Ok...I'm reading a collection of old newspaper columns/tidbits originally written by Addie Joss in Toledo papers from the early 1900's (published by McFarland) and finishing "Ring Around the Bases" by Ring Lardner and sitting in the on-deck pile is "Can't Anyone Here Play This Game?" by Jimmy Breslin (reread from my childhood). As far as people reading, all I can say is I find a lot more fans interested in fantasy baseball and Sportscenter than in baseball history or classic baseball fiction. Sad.

    Leave a comment:


  • abolishthedh
    replied
    The fact that noone has posted on this thread since July 1, 2016 is bothersome. Does anyone read anymore? Surely some folks do, from all ages.

    Soon, I will be starting the Howard Cosell biography, but I intend to read only about 2/3 of the book. His announcing career is of interest, but his childhood? You have to be kidding.

    Leave a comment:


  • abolishthedh
    replied
    Last summer, in a reply to another thread about which book I would like to see written, I mentioned that it would be great to see a book written about the 1970-1975 Oakland A's and all of the turmoil around that great team. Such a book had already been published by 1976, by Tom Scott, by the name of Champagne and Baloney.

    This summer I have the chance to savor this one. The author has a slight 'homer' style, but only a little bit. He must have been a West Coast individual, but his research and detail are fantastic. Scott is heavily slanted against Finley. It is interesting to read his opinions in what would have been present terms and without any hindsight over free agency or of Marvin Miller. The influence of other owners or the commissioner were also on the horizon. Not that these factors would have taken away from the story, but the present terms viewpoint takes me back to my fandom in the early 1970s. There is so much I had forgotten. The fights between the players on the team and in the locker room were worse than I had known about.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cowtipper
    replied
    Originally posted by Cowtipper View Post
    ^^ Good book, would recommend. Now I'm reading The Last Best League by Jim Collins. It's about the Cape Cod League.
    ^^ good book, would recommend.

    Now I am reading The Sluggers by John Holway.

    Leave a comment:


  • toomanyhatz
    replied
    I finally got to reading Molly Knight's book, which I loved. Here's what I said on another site (not sports-related):

    One of the truly great baseball books. Knight is a good writer, not a great one, but she got unprecedented access to one of the most colorful almost-great teams of recent times. And perfectionist Clayton Kershaw, oddball talent Zack Greinke, untamed youth Yasiel Puig and sensitive superstar Matt Kemp (a year on from having dated Rihanna) are an amazing cast of characters.
    I think it's almost better that Knight is a reporter and not a Norman Mailer type bringing her own agenda to it. It's such an unlikely combination of characters that the story can't fail to be interesting. And there's so many great 'right place at the right time' elements to it - like when she shows up at Kershaw's Dallas house right as the new contract is announced.

    Some of the players are apparently unhappy with how they're portrayed, but it certainly seems pretty honest and admirable. She doesn't throw anyone under the bus, but she doesn't gloss over anyone's flaws, either.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cowtipper
    replied
    Originally posted by Cowtipper View Post
    ^^ good book, would recommend. Hernandez's arrogance gets to be a little much sometimes, but a quality read.

    Now I'm reading The Worst Team Money Could Buy by Bob Klapisch and John Harper.
    ^^ Good book, would recommend. Now I'm reading The Last Best League by Jim Collins. It's about the Cape Cod League.

    Leave a comment:


  • abolishthedh
    replied
    It would be worth sharing a review of Pull Up A Chair. As media books go, this is one of a kind, because not too many broadcasters have an autobio nor a regular biography published about them. A lot of behind the scenes stuff is shared over who got along with whom, perspectives on the mistakes made by the networks in the hindsight of fans, and some baseball trivia which I never knew from time to time.

    That said, this is the kind of book which fans will read with the intent of reminiscing, but the author just doesn't have the style to allow for reminiscence. At one point on a page, you are reading about 1986, and in the same paragraph he is clearly mentioning 1988. The author isn't confusing his facts, he just moves too quickly. The book is 238 pages of reading, and that isn't enough to cover Scully's career. Admittedly, it might become boring to cover 67 years with the detail that some biographies offer, because Vin Scully is a family man without interesting personal sideshow stories. In any case, the author just moves too quickly to bring about any nostalgia, and so that is disappointing.

    Leave a comment:


  • abolishthedh
    replied
    The biography on Vin Scully, Pull Up A Chair, by Curt Smith. The author assumes a great deal on the part of the reader in the form of cultural reference points in the 1950s. These assumptions are not as troublesome once you have familiarity with those reference points from your own memory, just in my view. It is timely, with this being his last year.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Monument
    replied
    Just finished Ryne Duren's I Can See Clearly Now. With a 100 mph fastball and a serious drinking problem, Duren was Yanks closer before the term was used. Follows his career from late 50's to mid 60's, including glory years with Yanks in '60-61. Split between 50% baseball and 50% alcohol education without being preachy. This book segued nicely into Mariano Rivera's The Closer, which I'm halfway through. Amazing how Mo takes little credit for his abilities and chalks most of it up to God-given talent. I liked how he was able to bad-mouth the PED bunch without really saying anything bad . You have to read it to see what I mean. Both books are easy reading and highly recommended.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Monument
    replied
    Originally posted by Cod View Post
    I just picked up all four volumes of The Fireside Book of Baseball series for $14 at a used book store. I've heard about this series and been wanting them for awhile, so I'm pretty excited to start reading them.
    Great books at a great price! I read those growing up in the 70's. Lots of BB history.

    Leave a comment:

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