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Half-Empty: What Are Your Choices For Worst Baseball Movie?

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Ubiquitous
    Oh and Costner's last baseball movie was pretty bad.
    "For love of the game" was the movie...It was a stinker and the first movie that came into my mind when I saw the title of the thread. ATROCIOUS!
    RIP - HGF [1937-2009]

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    • #47
      Major League two and threee.....wesly snipes wasnt even in the second one but his character was, I hate when that happens.

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      • #48
        I nominate "Death on the Diamond." HORRIBLE piece of dreck. When you try and mix a film noir murder mystery with baseball, the results are rather poor...
        "They put me in the Hall of Fame? They must really be scraping the bottom of the barrel!"
        -Eppa Rixey, upon learning of his induction to the Baseball Hall of Fame.

        Motafy (MO-ta-fy) vt. -fied, -fying 1. For a pitcher to melt down in a big game situation; to become like Guillermo Mota. 2. The transformation of a good pitcher into one of Guillermo Mota's caliber.

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        • #49
          Chasing Dreams. I rented it about 5 years ago because like everyone else here, I'm a baseball movie junkie. It has Kevin Costner on the front, and since I liked FOD, Bull Durham, and For Love of the Game, I decided to give it a try. It was Costner's first role according to IMDB and he was only in the movie for 5 minutes as the big brother going off to Med School. The rest of the movie centers around a guy who has spent his whole life working on the farm. I don't recal how he started playing ball, but do remember that he couldn't hit until swung the bat like it was an ax, at which point he tore the cover off the ball. It was terrible. IMDB gave it a 3.3/10, but I think it was worse than that.
          Last edited by riverhawk; 01-17-2007, 01:58 PM.
          "It's fun, that's what it is, it's fun. Baseball is more fun than anything else. You can watch it and just love it and enjoy it. I don't think that there's anything tremendously philosophical about it. I don't think there's anything metaphysical I just think its so much fun to watch." - Robert Creamer

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          • #50
            The Winning Team was awfully bad. Reagan playing Pete Alexander was pathetic. They really went into fantasy land for the baseball facts. Last inning of the 7th inning of the 26 world series they have Alexander striking out the last batter. One of the memorable facts of that series was Alexander walking Ruth and the "babe" making the last out trying to steal second.
            Eight Men Out played things fast and loose when they had Dickie Kerr pitching right handed.
            Bill Bendix as Babe Ruth had to be the worst bb movie I can remember.
            "Bang the Drum Slowly" was excellent. di Nero looked like Willard Hershberger.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by ElCaminoSS
              i liked the scout and hardball. The whole point of the scout is that he is perfect obviously its not based on probability. And hardball was pretty good exept the part where G-Baby gets shot. poooooor gbaby

              I cannot stand the scout its just so stupid and not real. There is even a lefthanded catcher in spring training
              "The one constant through all the years has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It's been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt, and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game, is a part of our past. It reminds us of all that once was good, and what could be again."


              photobucket: http://s186.photobucket.com/albums/x115/ironman555/ttm/

              http://s186.photobucket.com/albums/x...Ip%20and%20GU/

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              • #52
                Has anyone even SEEN The Slugger's Wife? I have.

                I found it at Big Lots, bought it for kicks for $3.00. Basically, it was worth that. I would guess the love story strikes out because there's no closure. She thinks Darryl Palmer is suffocating her so she leaves him and he starts to tank again. So she just leaves him.

                I wouldn't say they got the baseball "wrong", per se. They tried. They got details wrong and weird of course. In the first scene that there was a shot of Palmer playing against the Reds and then they switch to Astros, when he probably should have had that shot all along. Duplicate shots at same angles, just different results, were there. Also, there was the obvious fact that the only place that they were allowed to shoot was Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium. No Carolina blue Braves road unis for this movie

                The fact they had the Braves team of broadcasters was a plus. Made that much more easier to swallow. Skip Caray saying "And once again, the Braves have trouble scoring runs," in one scene just rang so true.

                I had to double take twice when I realized that Mark Fidrych and Al Hrabosky (whose name is butchered in the credits: HRBOSKY or something like that) were pitching for the Astros. This is 1984! Fidrych had been retired for 4 years and Hrabosky had just retired a couple of seasons ago!

                And if I was the ump, I would have tossed Palmer for coming up to bat with the Walkman, not just confiscated it. At least he got his 62 home runs at the end of the season. Top that, Chipper and Andruw Jones!

                I can tell why "Oh, Jimmy!", which is in the opening credits, was nominated for a Golden Raspberry for Worst "Original" Song: it was just the same words over and over, like four or five times. Bleh.

                *shrugs* I expected it to be a hokey 80s movie, that's what I got. But it was somewhat enjoyable.
                46 wins to match last year's total

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                • #53
                  I had to bring this thread back. Sunday night, I was flipping thorugh channels and saw Safe at Home had just begun on a cable channel called Famnet, or something like that. I had not seen it and it was late, so I recorded it on my DVR. Little league and the New York Yankees meet, with major roles for Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris.

                  I watched it last night. It was probably the worst baseball film I've ever seen. Worse than the Babe Ruth films because if you look past the character assassination (!), they're poor movies at worst. Worse than the Bad News Bears and Sandlot sequels. Worse than The Slugger's Wife once you get past rail thin Danny Noonan. Just bad, bad, bad. Mumbling unemotional child actors. Fred Mertz way, way, way over the top. Muddled lessons about the importance of being a child, the have and have-nots, deception and perhaps the lamest sexual tension in movie history. And the one question that stuck with me throughout the picture.

                  If the little league team respresents Broward County, and the Yankees were training in Ft. Lauderdale, why would Mantle and Maris (forget the rest of the team) need to use the team plane to travel one whole Florida county? That's as egregious as Joe Jackson batting from the wrong side.
                  Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
                  Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
                  Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
                  Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
                  Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

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                  • #54
                    For Love of the Game. The entire premise of the movie is shot down by pretending the 10/5 rule doesn't exist.
                    The Ultimate Baseball Look

                    Modern Synthetic Baseball Fields

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                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose View Post
                      I had to bring this thread back. Sunday night, I was flipping thorugh channels and saw Safe at Home had just begun on a cable channel called Famnet, or something like that. I had not seen it and it was late, so I recorded it on my DVR. Little league and the New York Yankees meet, with major roles for Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris.

                      I watched it last night. It was probably the worst baseball film I've ever seen. Worse than the Babe Ruth films because if you look past the character assassination (!), they're poor movies at worst. Worse than the Bad News Bears and Sandlot sequels. Worse than The Slugger's Wife once you get past rail thin Danny Noonan. Just bad, bad, bad. Mumbling unemotional child actors. Fred Mertz way, way, way over the top. Muddled lessons about the importance of being a child, the have and have-nots, deception and perhaps the lamest sexual tension in movie history. And the one question that stuck with me throughout the picture.

                      If the little league team respresents Broward County, and the Yankees were training in Ft. Lauderdale, why would Mantle and Maris (forget the rest of the team) need to use the team plane to travel one whole Florida county? That's as egregious as Joe Jackson batting from the wrong side.
                      Back in the 1990s I remember watching a special episode of Siskel and Ebert that was promoting the use of letterboxing for VHS releases. One of the films that they used to show how letterboxing enhanced the viewing experience was Safe At Home.

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Phantom Dreamer View Post
                        For Love of the Game. The entire premise of the movie is shot down by pretending the 10/5 rule doesn't exist.

                        Costner plays a 40 year old pitcher who is basically at the end of his baseball career. He is informed by the owner, who has been like a father to him, of the Tigers informs him that he has sold the Tigers and that and that one of the first moves they'll make is to ship him out to the Giants. Rather than go through the whole rigmarole and possibly play for an ownership group that doesn't want him he opts to retire.

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by 85cards View Post
                          Director Phil Robinson was interviewed on a "Baseball Movie" theme show once and he said something to the effect that people always point out to him that Ray Liotta bats righty as Jackson in the movie and how that is inaccurate.

                          He responds that there is another glaring inaccuracy that those people rarely notice. Shoeless Joe is dead and in the movie they show him walking around. Its a movie, he said, get over it.
                          I am unforgiving of epic research failure, I could've gone to the local library and found in 5 minutes, and that was before the internet.

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                          • #58
                            I actually got Safe at Home on VHS, someone gave it to me on Christmas many years ago, I've never watched, I'm wondering if I should giving it the MST3K treatment.

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                            • #59
                              Worst: The Babe
                              2nd worst: Cobb
                              3rd worst: 8 Men Out (for the bad ballplaying)

                              Not based on budget or acting skill, my opinion is based on distortions or outright lies and crappy baseball action. When actors can't play ball in these movies (I was pleased to see Clemens play the young pitcher in Cobb, the heat he threw lent nice authenticity to the scant action in that movie), they do a GREAT injustice to the actual skills of the ballplayers of the deadball era. People often have a hard time separating fact from fiction, and I've had many heated discussions with friends who think baseball was played at a sub-high-school level in the deadball era simply because the actors in 8 Men Out, The Babe and other movies did not have the skills to pull off actual, realistic major league game action. And really, who could? What actor could realistically duplicate Joe Jackson's gorgeous swing? DB Sweeney did his best, and I think he was the best ballplayer in that film, but that would be a tough task for anyone. And the reputations of the actual real ballplayers of that time suffer as a result.

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                              • #60
                                Suprised nobody has mentioned the movie where DeNiro was the psycho Giants fan. Think it was called, "The Fan"? Thought it was ridiculous.

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