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Half-Empty: What Are Your Choices For Worst Baseball Movie?

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  • Half-Empty: What Are Your Choices For Worst Baseball Movie?

    I really enjoyed the thread on favorite baseball movies.

    I thought it might be a good mental exercise, and opinion-getter to have you guys to list your least favorite baseball flicks?

    Care to opine?

  • ol' aches and pains
    replied
    Originally posted by 3rdGenCub View Post

    What are the most accurate baseball movies? 61* or 42 maybe?
    I thought "42" was pretty accurate, better than I expected, right up to the end: The ending has the Dodgers playing in Pittsburgh with the Pennant on the line. Jackie Robinson comes up in the ninth inning, and hits a home run. As he trots around the bases, you hear the actor playing radio announcer Red Barber saying "The Dodgers are going to the World Series!", as if the game is over, despite the fact that they were playing in Pittsburgh, and there would be a bottom of the ninth still to be played. Or else Jackie Robinson hit the only walk-off home run on the road in history.

    Leave a comment:


  • pedrosrotatorcuff
    replied
    There has been but one mention of "Ed". Amazing. I have not seen the movie, but I know enough about it to safely say it is the worst baseball movie ever, worse than any biopic or historical drama involving baseball could ever be.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3rdGenCub
    replied
    Originally posted by TheGeorgiaPeach View Post
    I don't know about it being a bad film - that is, not entertaining - but Eight Men Out is a pretty bad depiction of the events surrounding the 1919 World Series. To be fair, most of the inaccuracies originate in Eliot Asinof's book, which is a different subject altogether. You could make a list of the inaccuracies in the film - thankfully, somone already has!

    Based on my username this is hardly a surprise, but 1994's Cobb, which adapts Al Stump's book, and inherits its inaccuracies.
    What are the most accurate baseball movies? 61* or 42 maybe? I consider Cobb the "worst" movie considering how grossly inaccurate its portrayal of Cobb was!

    Eight Men Out is one of my favorite baseball movies despite the apparent inaccuracies re the Black Sox. When Eight Men Out was made in 1988, the true history of the 1919 WS was not well known. In fact, I believe a lot of what really happened hadn't been uncovered yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheGeorgiaPeach
    replied
    I don't know about it being a bad film - that is, not entertaining - but Eight Men Out is a pretty bad depiction of the events surrounding the 1919 World Series. To be fair, most of the inaccuracies originate in Eliot Asinof's book, which is a different subject altogether. You could make a list of the inaccuracies in the film - thankfully, somone already has!

    Based on my username this is hardly a surprise, but 1994's Cobb, which adapts Al Stump's book, and inherits its inaccuracies.
    Last edited by TheGeorgiaPeach; 05-15-2019, 07:48 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • EdTarbusz
    replied
    Originally posted by toomanyhatz View Post

    Just came here to mention that. Truly awful. Wesley Snipes as an egotistical slugger clearly based on Bonds. The people who wrote the script have apparently never been to a game.
    John Kruk trying to play a convincing on-field corpse was the best part of The Fan.

    Leave a comment:


  • toomanyhatz
    replied
    Originally posted by PatNYM View Post
    Suprised nobody has mentioned the movie where DeNiro was the psycho Giants fan. Think it was called, "The Fan"? Thought it was ridiculous.
    Just came here to mention that. Truly awful. Wesley Snipes as an egotistical slugger clearly based on Bonds. The people who wrote the script have apparently never been to a game.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarStar00
    replied
    Originally posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
    They can make up a reasonably slender Gary Oldman to resemble Winston Churchill, I don't know why they couldn't do as much for the Babe.
    Armie Hammer might be a good pick for the Babe if somebody wants to make a movie in the next 10 years or so.

    He's 31 now and has a big round face; he could still pull off the young and (relatively) trim Babe of the Red Sox and with some padding, a prosthetic nose and jowly face makeup, he could play the roly-poly Ruth of his later years.

    armie-hammer-quits-twitter-explain.jpgbabe-ruth-090115-usnews-getty-ftr_13ec1v0x2q46f15fcg3jc73i2d.jpg?t=-1957282777&w=960&quality=70.jpg

    At 6-5, he's taller than the Babe but 6-5 today is pretty comparable to 6-3 of a hundred years ago. In 1918, 6-3 was on the borderline between "tall" and "towering."

    Not exactly a coincidence, but guys who fit the Ruth role facially and physically happen to be guys who at one time or another were considered for Superman.

    Presumably if they made a Ruth movie, also they'd get somebody 6-2 or so to play the 6-0 Gehrig. I could see Ryan Reynolds as Gehrig.

    AJLlDp3B4s6KB3jY_dXg-d6tQXvIiCCmO2I4E855KQ=s900-mo-c-c0xffffffff-rj-k-no.jpgLou-Gehrig.jpg
    Last edited by StarStar00; 04-23-2018, 10:50 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Toledo Inquisition
    replied
    The late, great Jimmy Piersall hated "Fear Strikes Out". He hated Anthony Perkins as not resembling his own playing skills (relative to any Hollywood actor) and said they made things up about his father.

    Piersall was involved in the script but said they made "last minute" Hollywood changes to make the picture more "Hollywood." He was angry at what they did to his father.

    I'll say that since it was his life, he'd have some knowledge on why the movie wasn't so hot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Jeltz
    replied
    In hindsight, Vincent D'Onofrio should have been cast as the Babe instead of Goodman. He resembles Babe facially and physically. Unfortunately, D'Onofrio wasn't a household name in 1992 and would be too old to be cast as Babe today, as he is 58.

    Leave a comment:


  • ol' aches and pains
    replied
    Originally posted by StarStar00 View Post
    Babe Ruth is particularly hard to cast for a movie spanning the majority of his career, because the directors' first inclination is to cast a big huge heavy guy like John Goodman.

    But big huge heavy guys can't even fake playing even half believably. And for the first half of his career, Ruth was not fat -- thick and solid, yes, but he didn't get fat until the late 20s with the Yankees. Goodman later lost weight and got down to about 250 -- maybe he could have played the late-era Ruth. But when they made the movie, Goodman was 300 pounds or more and Ruth was never that fat, even in his final year with the Braves.

    In more recent actors, Jon Hamm might have been decent to play Ruth -- in good enough shape to play the young athletic Ruth but also round-faced enough he could play the big-bellied Babe of his 30s. But he's 46 now and probably aged out of the role.
    They can make up a reasonably slender Gary Oldman to resemble Winston Churchill, I don't know why they couldn't do as much for the Babe.

    Leave a comment:


  • epaddon
    replied
    I have my own recording of the Lang TV-movie from the original NBC broadcast, though it isn't the most exceptional transfer but quite watchable. It is the best of any Ruth biopic by adding some believable nuance (especially in his relationship with Huggins).

    Leave a comment:


  • SHOELESSJOE3
    replied
    Two that completely missed the mark, because of what he really was.
    Both Babe Ruth's Bendix and and OMG.Goodman.
    Babe portrayed as a big clumsy oaf. Burn them both.

    The Babe made for TV, Steven Lang, right on, the best Babe Movie, 1991.
    I have searched for years, unable to find it on a disc, no where.

    Leave a comment:


  • Orioles5
    replied
    I used to work with a guy that was a dead ringer for Ty Cobb. I eventually asked him if he was any relation to Cobb and he said that as far as he knew he was not related.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarStar00
    replied
    Babe Ruth is particularly hard to cast for a movie spanning the majority of his career, because the directors' first inclination is to cast a big huge heavy guy like John Goodman.

    But big huge heavy guys can't even fake playing even half believably. And for the first half of his career, Ruth was not fat -- thick and solid, yes, but he didn't get fat until the late 20s with the Yankees. Goodman later lost weight and got down to about 250 -- maybe he could have played the late-era Ruth. But when they made the movie, Goodman was 300 pounds or more and Ruth was never that fat, even in his final year with the Braves.

    In more recent actors, Jon Hamm might have been decent to play Ruth -- in good enough shape to play the young athletic Ruth but also round-faced enough he could play the big-bellied Babe of his 30s. But he's 46 now and probably aged out of the role.

    "Cobb" was abysmal too. Tommy Lee Jones was way too old to play the young Cobb in the flashbacks as a player, and he looked and sounded nothing whatsoever like the older bitter Cobb. In his speaking voice Cobb had a Southern inflection while Jones was more like a drawling Texas cowboy.

    One younger actor who does look, facially, somewhat, like Cobb, is Edward Norton, who is 6-0 and reasonably athletic. In a Cobb movie in the 1990s, I would have cast him as the young player Cobb and then gone with Gene Hackman as the seventyish embittered Cobb.
    Last edited by StarStar00; 11-24-2017, 02:10 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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