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  • Originally posted by wamby
    I thought the most interesting part of Luckiest Man was when it started discussing ALS and how it affected Gehgig. I've come away from it thinking that the most amazing season an American professional athlete ever had on the field was Gehrig in 1939.
    I second that, except I came away believing 1938 was

    A close second for me might be Babe's 1920. Aside from the actual numbers he put up, he had a ton of pressure on him from many angles (although he probably never felt it). He battled various injuries/illness and still did what he did. He was busy shooting a movie and did what he did. He shattered his own HR record. He had a 26 game hitting streak despite being intentionally walked and pitched around quite often. As late as early August he topped out with a .391 BA. Did I mention the actual numbers? :o
    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
      I second that, except I came away believing 1938 was

      A close second for me might be Babe's 1920. Aside from the actual numbers he put up, he had a ton of pressure on him from many angles (although he probably never felt it). He battled various injuries/illness and still did what he did. He was busy shooting a movie and did what he did. He shattered his own HR record. He had a 26 game hitting streak despite being intentionally walked and pitched around quite often. As late as early August he topped out with a .391 BA. Did I mention the actual numbers? :o
      Randy,
      If I didn't already know you so well, I'd almost swear you were a tad partial to a player named George Henry. His friends sometimes called him, Babe. Say it ain't so, Randy!

      Billy Boy

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
        I second that, except I came away believing 1938 was

        A close second for me might be Babe's 1920. Aside from the actual numbers he put up, he had a ton of pressure on him from many angles (although he probably never felt it). He battled various injuries/illness and still did what he did. He was busy shooting a movie and did what he did. He shattered his own HR record. He had a 26 game hitting streak despite being intentionally walked and pitched around quite often. As late as early August he topped out with a .391 BA. Did I mention the actual numbers? :o
        I have Babe Ruth Launchung the Legend but haven't sat down and read it yet.

        Re: Gehrig in 1939: The thought of a player getting four hits at the big league level while sufering from an advanced case of ALS is just mind-boggling to me.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by wamby
          Re: Gehrig in 1939: The thought of a player getting four hits at the big league level while sufering from an advanced case of ALS is just mind-boggling to me.
          Now that's what I call tenacity.

          Bill

          Comment


          • Originally posted by wamby
            I have Babe Ruth Launchung the Legend but haven't sat down and read it yet.

            Re: Gehrig in 1939: The thought of a player getting four hits at the big league level while sufering from an advanced case of ALS is just mind-boggling to me.
            I know Wamby. But that 1938 season. Both gut wrenching and heart warming when you look bac on it. Him struggling and not really knowing why. His muscles just not reacting the same way they once used to. Him ordering lighter bats. The numbers he was still able to put up in '38 are friekin' incredible to me.
            Originally posted by Bill
            Randy,
            If I didn't already know you so well, I'd almost swear you were a tad partial to a player named George Henry. His friends sometimes called him, Babe. Say it ain't so, Randy!
            A tad? I try to remain unbiased, but GHR makes it so hard with what he did.
            "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

            ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
              I know Wamby. But that 1938 season. Both gut wrenching and heart warming when you look bac on it. Him struggling and not really knowing why. His muscles just not reacting the same way they once used to. Him ordering lighter bats. The numbers he was still able to put up in '38 are friekin' incredible to me.


              A tad? I try to remain unbiased, but GHR makes it so hard with what he did.
              I'm not trying to minimize 1938, that was quite a season too. I bet Gehrig heard a lots of whispers that he was through and that he became washed up in an extraordinarily short time. I thknk if I had been a fan in the 1930s, that Gehrig may have been my favorite player. He is my favorite type of professional athlete.

              I recently read a book on the history of polio in America, and I think someone could write a good book about ALS in America also. It would be a lot tougher since it doesn't seem like there will be a cure for ALS anytime soon.

              Comment


              • By the way, the first biography of Eddie Collins is now available. Here is the link on Amazon.com.

                http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...ookfindercom0e


                Rick can be contacted at

                rhuhn@earthlink.net

                The only thing is, Eddie wrote his biography in the Sporting News. It was in 5 installments. If anyone has access to TSN, via paperofrecord, the dates are given as follows.

                Here are the links: You may have to register with paper of record, which is free.

                First Installment: October 11, 1950, pp. 13-14. ----http://www.paperofrecord.com/paper_v...CurrentBlock=1

                Second Installment: October 18, 1950, pp. 13-14.----http://www.paperofrecord.com/paper_v...CurrentBlock=1

                Third Installation: October 25, 1950, pp. 11-12.----http://www.paperofrecord.com/paper_v...CurrentBlock=1

                Fourth Installment: November 1, 1950, pp. 13-14.----http://www.paperofrecord.com/paper_v...CurrentBlock=1

                Fifth Installment: November 8, 1950, pp. 13-14.----http://www.paperofrecord.com/paper_v...CurrentBlock=1
                Last edited by Bill Burgess; 01-18-2008, 06:48 PM.

                Comment


                • The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron
                  Howard Bryant
                  2010

                  I started reading this on Sunday night and I could not put it down. It is an amazing bio of one of my favorite players in MLB history. I have gotten through about 100 pgs and learned so much about Aaron.

                  I really like that there is not chapter on chapter about his childhood. I know that it is important to setting up the life of the man, but there is 2 chapters that deal with him growing up in Mobile, then Chapter 3 starts his BRIEF Negro League stint (I did not know that he played in the Negro Leagues.) and his assignment to the Minor leagues when the Milwaukee Braves bought him for $10,000.

                  It really sickens me that black players were treated the way that they were in the 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s. Bryant tells of how the black players stayed in the houses of black host families while the white players were put up in nice hotels during the season. Bryant also tells of some of the sympathetic white players that would try to help out the black players and be ostracized by the rest of the team for it.

                  I can already tell that this is going to be one of the best bios that I have ever read. I know that Aaron help contribute to the book, but only after Barry Bonds passed his 755 HR mark. Aaron is very concerned about his status in the world. He feels (probably rightly so) that people just want him to relive the glory days. He does not want that to be his place in life.

                  I will post other little tidbits in this post that I find interesting throughout the book.

                  Tidbit #1: Henry Aaron does not like the name 'Hank' and usually does not respond to it. Only two people called him 'Hank' before he started getting famous. One was a childhood friend from Mobile and the other was Dusty Baker.

                  Comment


                  • "Young John McGraw Of Truxton" by yours truly. The focus is on his teenage years on his local town team. There are some corrections to his previous biographies. Available thru Amazon.
                    "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
                    "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

                    Comment


                    • First time I've ever seen this thread - wow! Thanks for all the work everyone put in, especially dgarza!

                      I'll mention some newer ones off the top of my head:


                      In Cobb's Shadow: The Hall of Famer Careers of Sam Crawford, Harry Heilmann and Heinie Manush by Dan D'Addona

                      Sam Rice: A Biography of the Washington Senators Hall of Famer by Jeff Carroll

                      Ken Williams: A Slugger in Ruth's Shadow by Dave Heller (of our own forum)

                      Bucketfoot Al: The Baseball Life of Al Simmons by Clifton Blue Parker
                      R.I.P. Scott Sanderson (1956-2019)


                      Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

                      Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

                      Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

                      Comment

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