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Best [and Worst] Portrayls of Ballplayers in Films

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  • #16
    I always thought that a bio about Leo Durocher would have made a hell of a movie. I think at one time Robert Duvall would have been terrific as Leo, but he's too old now.
    It Might Be? It Could Be?? It Is!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by christian gentleman
      Joaquin Pheonix as Cobb?

      Lou Gehrig is a tough one. Such a quiet, decent person. Hard to find someone like that in showbusiness. Maybe Hugh Jackman?
      Just from seeing Phoenix in Ladder 49, I'd give him the role of Gehrig.

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      • #18
        iron phoenix

        thought that too. joaquin as lou would be great. he might have to bulk up a bit. his johnny cash was amazing. great actor. baseball would be a challenge for him.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by christian gentleman
          thought that too. joaquin as lou would be great. he might have to bulk up a bit. his johnny cash was amazing. great actor. baseball would be a challenge for him.
          He had to bulk up to do Ladder 49 so I don't think it would be out of his league to play the role
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          Originally posted by nymdan
          Too... much... math... head... hurts...
          Originally posted by RuthMayBond
          I understand, I lost all my marbles years ago

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          • #20
            I think Vincent D'Onofrio would make a great Babe Ruth. The thing you have to get right with the actor, is the size of head. He has that. The hair can always be done to look right, and makeup on the nose can broaden it to give realism. But the head size is the big thing. I think he might have an athletic background, he's a great character actor, and he has the ability to lose weight or put on weight. He's also got the right voice, but would need to add a southern draw.
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            • #21
              Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
              I think Vincent D'Onofrio would make a great Babe Ruth. The thing you have to get right with the actor, is the size of head. He has that. The hair can always be done to look right, and makeup on the nose can broaden it to give realism. But the head size is the big thing. I think he might have an athletic background, he's a great character actor, and he has the ability to lose weight or put on weight. He's also got the right voice, but would need to add a southern draw.
              He has done a drawl before, I believe he used one in "The Newton Boys". He also is naturally stocky so he can play Ruth over the course of his career pretty easilly.

              The problem with him though is he is on a hit TV series and may not be able to get the time off required for filming such a complex character...possible to work around if the character was broken up between his youth, his prime, and his decline/retirement like was suggested earlier...
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              Originally posted by nymdan
              Too... much... math... head... hurts...
              Originally posted by RuthMayBond
              I understand, I lost all my marbles years ago

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              • #22
                Originally posted by efin98
                He has done a drawl before, I believe he used one in "The Newton Boys". He also is naturally stocky so he can play Ruth over the course of his career pretty easilly.

                The problem with him though is he is on a hit TV series and may not be able to get the time off required for filming such a complex character...possible to work around if the character was broken up between his youth, his prime, and his decline/retirement like was suggested earlier...
                Oh he HAS done a southern drawl before? That's good news. One less worry.

                You have a point. He's on Law and Order right? Maybe during hiatis(sp?) or something he could find time.

                He's a little taller than I thought he was; 6'4", which is 2" inches taller than Ruth. I think he'd be great at playing Ruth though, especially a younger Ruth circa '18-'21. He wouldn't need to add too much weight for a later Ruth, just around his belly. Hell, DeNiro gained like 40 pounds to play an aged Jake LaMotta in Raging Bull. It can be done.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Sultan_1895-1948
                  I think Vincent D'Onofrio would make a great Babe Ruth. The thing you have to get right with the actor, is the size of head. He has that. The hair can always be done to look right, and makeup on the nose can broaden it to give realism. But the head size is the big thing. I think he might have an athletic background, he's a great character actor, and he has the ability to lose weight or put on weight. He's also got the right voice, but would need to add a southern draw.
                  Check out D'Onofrio in Full Metal Jacket as Leonard. The total Ruth body type, slightly pudgy yet strong looking. Do you think he may be too old now, he'll be 47 in June?
                  Last edited by Honus Wagner Rules; 02-25-2006, 01:34 AM.
                  Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                  • #24
                    Roy Campanella Bio

                    Has anyone else seen "It's Good to Be Alive" a 1974 made for tv bio about Campy, mostly dealing with his rehab struggle after his tragic accident in late January, 1958 till he's honored at the LA Coliseum in 1959? Paul Winfield plays Campy, does a good job in what had to be a difficult role, doesn't play Roy in any baseball scenes [there is some great film footage of Campy at the start of the movie]

                    But I'm curious about very sympathetic portrayal that Walter O'Malley gets in the film. In the first scenes of the movie, there is a totally preposterous scene where O'Malley[played by veteran character actor Ramon Bieri] on 1/28/58 is in Harlem at Roy's liquor store, late in the evening as Roy is getting ready to close for the evening. Now in winter of 58 I would doubt that O'Malley would set foot anywhere in NY without armed guards, but in the movie, he has come to Harlem by himself to check about his health and to tell him why he had to move the Dodgers to LA. On his way home that evening, Campanella has his accident. Then in about the middle of the movie, when Campy seems in his most depressed state of mind,O'Malley comes to visit and to tell him that the Dodgers need him in spring training in 1959. Campy's attitude makes a complete turnaround after his visit, kind of giving the impression that no one else from the Dodger family had ever visited him. So I just wonder if the director [Michael Landon] may have been good friends with O'Malley? Also, Bieri was much slimmer than O'M, also didn't wear the glasses. Did have the stogie going though.
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                    • #25
                      Billy Bob Thornton supposedly played baseball in college. He may be too old to act as a player, but a manager might be a possibility for him?
                      "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
                      "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules
                        Check out D'Onofrio in Full Metal Jacket as Leonard. The total Ruth body type, slightly pudgy yet strong looking. Do you think he may be too old now, he'll be 47 in June?
                        Remember it's Hollywood, those folks play characters much younger and older than their real age. 47 would mean he can pick up Ruth(realistically) around his early 30s- during his prime. Ruth's younger years can be played by a different person, especially if you include his Baltimore and Boston years in the film...
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                        Originally posted by nymdan
                        Too... much... math... head... hurts...
                        Originally posted by RuthMayBond
                        I understand, I lost all my marbles years ago

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                        • #27
                          Barney Fife

                          It doesn't have a single thing to do with baseball, but RIP, Don Knotts...Barney Fife was the most hilarious character in the history of tv.
                          It Might Be? It Could Be?? It Is!

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by christian gentleman
                            Regards 64Cards!
                            Lou Gehrig is a tough one. Such a quiet, decent person. Hard to find someone like that in showbusiness. Maybe Hugh Jackman.
                            more to come.
                            Have always imagined Harrison Ford being great for Gehrig (modern day version of Cooper anyway, IMO).
                            And Chuck Norris for Mike Schmidt.
                            Not that they'll ever do a movie on Von Hayes (Phillies), but Nick Cage would have been perfect.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by 64Cards
                              Has anyone else seen "It's Good to Be Alive" a 1974 made for tv bio about Campy, mostly dealing with his rehab struggle after his tragic accident in late January, 1958 till he's honored at the LA Coliseum in 1959? Paul Winfield plays Campy, does a good job in what had to be a difficult role, doesn't play Roy in any baseball scenes [there is some great film footage of Campy at the start of the movie]

                              But I'm curious about very sympathetic portrayal that Walter O'Malley gets in the film. In the first scenes of the movie, there is a totally preposterous scene where O'Malley[played by veteran character actor Ramon Bieri] on 1/28/58 is in Harlem at Roy's liquor store, late in the evening as Roy is getting ready to close for the evening. Now in winter of 58 I would doubt that O'Malley would set foot anywhere in NY without armed guards, but in the movie, he has come to Harlem by himself to check about his health and to tell him why he had to move the Dodgers to LA. On his way home that evening, Campanella has his accident. Then in about the middle of the movie, when Campy seems in his most depressed state of mind,O'Malley comes to visit and to tell him that the Dodgers need him in spring training in 1959. Campy's attitude makes a complete turnaround after his visit, kind of giving the impression that no one else from the Dodger family had ever visited him. So I just wonder if the director [Michael Landon] may have been good friends with O'Malley? Also, Bieri was much slimmer than O'M, also didn't wear the glasses. Did have the stogie going though.
                              Campanella himself had a lot of input on the script which is why O'Malley is portrayed as he was. They were good friends. Campy gave O'Malley a lot of praise after his accident, and for the rest of his life, saying that if there were more Walter O'Malleys, the world would be a much better place. O'Malley continued Campy's full salary years after his accident until he could recover enough to go back to work for the Dodgers as a special instructor - a job which he continued until his death in the 1990s.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Elvis9045
                                Campanella himself had a lot of input on the script which is why O'Malley is portrayed as he was. They were good friends. Campy gave O'Malley a lot of praise after his accident, and for the rest of his life, saying that if there were more Walter O'Malleys, the world would be a much better place. O'Malley continued Campy's full salary years after his accident until he could recover enough to go back to work for the Dodgers as a special instructor - a job which he continued until his death in the 1990s.
                                I'll give O'Malley props for taking care of Campanella, although someone would have to be one totally cold, hard-hearted SOB not to, after all Campy had done for the the Dodgers. Especially considering the money O'Malley was making.
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