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Forever Blue: The True Story of Walter O'Malley

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  • Forever Blue: The True Story of Walter O'Malley

    http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-3...oversial-Owner

    Pulitzer Prize winning author Michael D'Antonio paints an in-depth account of O'Malley's life that goes beyond the Dodgers moving out of Brooklyn.
    Baseball Happenings
    - Linking baseball's past, present and future.
    http://baseballhappenings.blogspot.com

  • #2
    Thanks for the link. I'm looking forward to reading this.
    Check out my Canadian baseball history blog called "Cooperstowners in Canada": http://www.kevinglew.wordpress.com

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    • #3
      I might have to give this a read.
      The Evil Empire shall strike back again!
      http://litbases.wordpress.com/

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      • #4
        I saw D'Antonio give a talk about his book at the Brooklyn Historical Society, with Peter O'Malley on hand too. The O'Malleys gave D'Antonio access to the family archives, a tremendous resource -- but as you might expect, D'Antonio is strongly pro-O'Malley. Like Michael Shapiro, he's part of what i call the "Blame it on Bob" (Robert Moses) camp.

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        • #5
          I gathered that from reading the book, but I was unaware of how strong Moses' involvement was in the decision. Call me ignorant, but in the past, all I heard was negatives about how O'Malley took the Dodgers out of Brooklyn because he couldn't get a new stadium. I never heard Moses' name attached to it, or some of the road blocks that he put up for O'Malley. Los Angeles made a lot of concessions to bring over the Dodgers, which are explained in the book.
          Baseball Happenings
          - Linking baseball's past, present and future.
          http://baseballhappenings.blogspot.com

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          • #6
            I strongly caution those to not get suckered into D'Antonio's thesis (previously championed by Michael Shapiro as well) that Robert Moses is the true villain of the story. This is unadulterated nonsense and two better authors, Henry Fetter in "Taking On The Yankees" and Robert Murphy in "After Many A Summer" have more than effectively rebutted this by noting the total absence of context regarding the New York City political situation at the time that Shapiro and D'Antonio don't provide, not to mention the fact that neither O'Malley apologist ever provides a true economic assessment regarding the Atlantic Avenue site and whether or not it would have solved all the hardship problems of parking etc. that O'Malley was claiming. The most devastating point from Fetter is how O'Malley was only prepared to pay $1 million for land he expected the city to condemn under eminent domain and turn over to him, but the true value of the land was actually $9 million and thus what O'Malley wanted was for the New York City taxpayer to foot the bill for over 80% of an act of corporate welfare at its worst. Moses was against that, but so too was everyone else in New York city government including many long-time enemies of Moses who were not the kind of people who would feel intimidated by Moses in any other context.

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            • #7
              I don't really think O'Malley gets a fair shake anyway. His move proved to be an important moment in baseball history because it opened up the west.
              The Evil Empire shall strike back again!
              http://litbases.wordpress.com/

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              • #8
                But that was an idea that I don't think required Walter O'Malley to be the trailblazer. Baseball could easily have come to the west coast in due course without the unnecessary uprooting of the Dodgers.

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