Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

TV Show Pawn Stars 1951 Yankee Ball

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • TV Show Pawn Stars 1951 Yankee Ball

    The pawn star guys offered this guy 800 dollars for a team signed 1951 Yankee ball -- first of all why would that guy even try to sell a ball like that at a pawn store, but 800 dollars for that ball is way to low of a price for a ball like that. maybe im wrong but wouldnt a ball like that prob fetch 10 grand easy? dimaggio and berra had there names on it and maybe stengall too. the authenticator couldnt tell if it was stengal s name on the ball. The guy wasnt asking for a unreasonable price for the ball at 3000 grand -when i heard him say 3 grand i wanted to buy it.
    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

  • #2
    Well, the pawn shop boys aren't in business to pay market value for things. Typically they want to buy as cheaply as they can. The 1951 Yanks had five HoF players (DiMaggio, Berra, Mantle, Rizzuto, and Mize) as well as HoF manager Casey Stengel. This would be a highly collectible ball if all those signatures were on it, and in good shape, and legit. I suspect that the Pawn shop guys had no ability to validate the signatures.

    And what provenance was the seller offering them??
    Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

    Comment


    • #3
      Mantle was on it too -- the lady who came in and validated the ball even said Mantle had two types of signatures, one of them he used a sailboat type of signature and the other one was the one shown on that 1951 ball from his early years. The lady who looked at it said it was real but i guess the condition wasnt perfect. Im not sure what you mean by provenance but the Pawn Stars show is based out of Las Vegas. Yeah i agree pawn stores always want to make a buck but 800 dollars for a ball like that is an insult to that seller. I bet he woulda taken 2 grand and they woulda made a nice profit from that. The seller didnt seem to really know the sentimental value of a ball like that, he prob wanted to sell it so he could gamble more in Vegas. I think they said there was 22 signatures on the ball.
      "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

      "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

      Comment


      • #4
        I saw this episode a while back. The pawn guys brought in an autograph authenticator who couldn't tell if Casey's auto was there or not. The ball was in pretty rough shape. Even a mint ball with every autograph probably would't fetch 10K (especially in this economic climate). In any case, 3K for that particular ball would be a very high price compared to market value.
        Say hello on Twitter @BSmile & Facebook "Baseball by BSmile"

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by BSmile View Post
          I saw this episode a while back. The pawn guys brought in an autograph authenticator who couldn't tell if Casey's auto was there or not. The ball was in pretty rough shape. Even a mint ball with every autograph probably would't fetch 10K (especially in this economic climate). In any case, 3K for that particular ball would be a very high price compared to market value.
          wow i woulda deff thought a ball like that would sell at a higher price -- im not too familer with baseball memorabilia tho. also when i typed in 1951 yankee team signed ball the asking price was 3-5 grand so i guess 800 at a pawn store is a reasonable price. But again that would be the only yankee team with both Mantle and Dimaggio on it so its kinda surprising that a ball like that would sell for only 3-5 grand
          Last edited by chicagowhitesox1173; 09-20-2010, 09:47 AM.
          "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

          "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by chicagowhitesox1173 View Post
            wow i woulda deff thought a ball like that would sell at a higher price -- im not too familer with baseball memorabilia tho. also when i typed in 1951 yankee team signed ball the asking price was 3-5 grand so i guess 800 at a pawn store is a reasonable price. But again that would be the only yankee team with both Mantle and Dimaggio on it so its kinda surprising that a ball like that would sell for only 3-5 grand
            The condition really plays a major role in the market value.
            Also, post-WWII Yankees team signed balls aren't exactly "rare", or at least not as rare as you might think.
            You'd be surprised how many nicely conditioned and authenticated '51 team balls are out there at the better auction houses in a given year.
            Last edited by BSmile; 09-20-2010, 10:35 AM.
            Say hello on Twitter @BSmile & Facebook "Baseball by BSmile"

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah, I saw that episode and the ball was in pretty rough condition. Team-signed balls generally are not as popular as single-signed balls. For example, a single-signed Roberto Clemente ball is much more valuable than a team-signed 1971 Pirates team ball. In the case of the Yankees ball on Pawn Stars, the ball would likely sell for more if it just boasted a crisp, clean DiMaggio autograph (and no other signatures).
              Check out my Canadian baseball history blog called "Cooperstowners in Canada": http://www.kevinglew.wordpress.com

              Comment

              Ad Widget

              Collapse
              Working...
              X