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"42" ... Anyone Planning To See This?

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  • Saw the movie a month or so ago and thought it was pretty faithful. I'd be VERY surprised if Harrison Ford isn't nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Academy Award. I just hope there is still interest in the movie by the time the Golden Globes and Oscars come on- it's a long way away.
    Me being me, I was able to pick out three very minor inaccuracies other than the ones already mentioned. The Polo Grounds had what I call a "Double Negative"- It had the Chesterfield sign on the center field wall, when it wasn't there until Chesterfield became the Giants' radio and TV sponsor in 1948. The Crosley Field recreation looked okay on the surface, but it looked like the billboards on top of the Crowe Engineering/ Lackner Sign building on Western Avenue were from the mid 50's instead. Too bad they couldn't have used the Crosley Field replica in Blue Ash, Ohio, but perhaps it was logistically easier to do what they did. And thirdly, the transportation captain must have been asleep, because there was a scene with Jackie and Rachel where it looks there is a 1949-52 Chrysler product- probably a Plymouth- behind them.
    But as I said, that's just me being anal.
    Last edited by chinese home run; 07-09-2013, 02:59 PM.

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    • My wife and I rented it on Amazon a couple of days ago. We rented it for 48 hours so we watched it twice together on 2 different days. She thoroughly enjoyed it even though she is not a baseball fan. From my knowledge of his story it seemed pretty faithful to what I had read and heard. I will order a DVD version for my personal collection.

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      • I have one little quibble about "42" after watching it again: Apparently Robinson is the only player in history to hit a walk-off home run on the road. The movie ends on Sept. 17, 1947, with Brooklyn playing in Pittsburgh. Jackie Robinson hits a home run, and as he's rounding the bases, the actor playing Red Barber is heard on the radio exclaiming, prematurely, "The Dodgers are going to the World Series!" Jackie did hit a home run that day, but it was in the fourth inning.
        They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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        • Originally posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
          I have one little quibble about "42" after watching it again: Apparently Robinson is the only player in history to hit a walk-off home run on the road. The movie ends on Sept. 17, 1947, with Brooklyn playing in Pittsburgh. Jackie Robinson hits a home run, and as he's rounding the bases, the actor playing Red Barber is heard on the radio exclaiming, prematurely, "The Dodgers are going to the World Series!" Jackie did hit a home run that day, but it was in the fourth inning.
          This is my issue with movies that change facts for dramatic effect...sometimes the true history can speak for itself or they could have used another way to end it

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          • But did that win clinch the pennant? Was that a key hit in the game? Maybe it's a (reenactment of) real radio call audio for that game transposed onto the video of the stroke by the movie's central character? Time-shifting audio relative to video is a pretty common cinematic technique (much voiceover narration is this)... yes, I understand how it could be misleading, but it's not quite "changing facts," to my interpretation..

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            • My quibble is how they made Fritz Ostermueller out to be some sort of headhunting bigot, when there is no evidence to back that up. He did hit Robinson once, but in the elbow, not the head, and it was because Robinson was crowding the plate. There's also no evidence that Ostermueller was a bigot, and I don't see why they had to make him out to be one, when there were plenty of pitchers who actually were bigoted who could have been used instead.
              Last edited by egri; 12-30-2014, 11:18 AM.
              Check out my new autograph blog

              Signed 1953 Topps Project: 102/274 (37.23%) complete

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              • Originally posted by egri View Post
                My quibble is how they made Fritz Ostermueller out to be some sort of headhunting bigot, when there is no evidence to back that up. He did hit Robinson once, but in the elbow, not the head, and it was because Robinson was crowding the plate. There's also no evidence that Ostermueller was a bigot, and I don't see why they had to make him out to be one, when there were plenty of pitchers who actually were bigoted who could have been used instead.
                Also, when Robinson took first the Pirates first baseman told Robinson it wasn't a purpose pitch. Also, Ostermueller was left handed, not right handed!

                Cooperstown Confidential: What really happened with Fritz Ostermueller and Jackie Robinson
                Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                • Originally posted by Pere View Post
                  But did that win clinch the pennant? Was that a key hit in the game? Maybe it's a (reenactment of) real radio call audio for that game transposed onto the video of the stroke by the movie's central character? Time-shifting audio relative to video is a pretty common cinematic technique (much voiceover narration is this)... yes, I understand how it could be misleading, but it's not quite "changing facts," to my interpretation..
                  I believe that win did clinch the pennant, but my point was as Robinson was trotting around the bases, Red Barber was saying "The Dodgers are going to the World Series", neglecting the fact that the game was played in Pittsburgh (and was depicted as such in the film), and there would still be a bottom of the ninth inning.
                  They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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                  • Yes, I understand. I'm saying (without actually reviewing the scene) you were perhaps watching too literally--the movie (maybe) wasn't saying he said that at that moment, any more than a movie with voiceover narration, or triumphal music swelling, is saying that the narrator's voice, or the music, is actually booming out of the sky in a scene. It's a language-of-cinema thing. Even documentaries (which this wasn't) use it.
                    Last edited by Pere; 12-30-2014, 02:05 PM.

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                    • Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
                      Also, when Robinson took first the Pirates first baseman told Robinson it wasn't a purpose pitch. Also, Ostermueller was left handed, not right handed!

                      Cooperstown Confidential: What really happened with Fritz Ostermueller and Jackie Robinson
                      That reminds me of another gripe of mine: in the game where Robinson spiked Slaughter, later on Robinson was standing on second and Cardinals second baseman Red Schoendienst went over to him and told him that the majority of the Cardinal players were disgusted with Slaughter for the play, and they thought Robinson was in the right. Would it have been that difficult to add that moment in? I think it could have been a very powerful scene, an opposing player telling Robinson he was on his side, but we didn't get to see that.

                      I actually enjoyed the movie. I just think the directors tried to cram too much into 2 hours. I think they could have told the story better and more fully if there had been a '42 Part 1' and a '42 Part 2', instead of them trying to shoehorn one of the biggest moments of the 20th century into one movie. And they would have made double the amount of money.
                      Check out my new autograph blog

                      Signed 1953 Topps Project: 102/274 (37.23%) complete

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                      • Originally posted by egri View Post
                        That reminds me of another gripe of mine: in the game where Robinson spiked Slaughter, later on Robinson was standing on second and Cardinals second baseman Red Schoendienst went over to him and told him that the majority of the Cardinal players were disgusted with Slaughter for the play, and they thought Robinson was in the right. Would it have been that difficult to add that moment in? I think it could have been a very powerful scene, an opposing player telling Robinson he was on his side, but we didn't get to see that.

                        I actually enjoyed the movie. I just think the directors tried to cram too much into 2 hours. I think they could have told the story better and more fully if there had been a '42 Part 1' and a '42 Part 2', instead of them trying to shoehorn one of the biggest moments of the 20th century into one movie. And they would have made double the amount of money.
                        The
                        Sadly I dont believe it would have made double the money...its not harry potter or the hunger games...not nearly as many people interested in period historical events

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                        • Hey Allie. No I was not and wish I was. I had asked to be on set for the shooting there, but they weren't willing to pay my transportation to the set for those days. I secured the ballpark but didn't do the shooting days. I love Luther Williams and when I was looking for shooting locations, Macon was actually in consideration for being the "main ballpark". Chattanooga however had many advantages.. mainly being that they were thinking about tearing it down and didn't give us any issues about doing whatever we wanted to the ballpark to make it conducive to what we needed to do.

                          Eric Pastore
                          Baseball Stadium Consultant - 42
                          Author of "500 Ballparks"
                          Webmaster of www.digitalballparks.com "An Online Baseball Stadium Museum featuring nearly 15,000 Hi-Res photographs of Professional baseball stadiums"
                          \nt for "42"

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                          • Originally posted by Digitalballparks View Post
                            Hey Allie. No I was not and wish I was. I had asked to be on set for the shooting there, but they weren't willing to pay my transportation to the set for those days. I secured the ballpark but didn't do the shooting days. I love Luther Williams and when I was looking for shooting locations, Macon was actually in consideration for being the "main ballpark". Chattanooga however had many advantages.. mainly being that they were thinking about tearing it down and didn't give us any issues about doing whatever we wanted to the ballpark to make it conducive to what we needed to do.
                            Although I wasn't involved in production, I was on hand for a few shoots (as a guest of one of the principles) and it was cool seeing LW with some "buzz." Although Trouble with the Curve also used the location, there hasn't been much activity since the last indie team/ league left in 2010.
                            If I had only spent a tenth of the time studying Physics that I spent learning Star Wars and Baseball trivia, I would have won the Nobel Prize.

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