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19th Century Baseball Recommendations

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  • 19th Century Baseball Recommendations

    Anybody got any particularly good 19th Century baseball book recommendations?

    The one I've read is "Where They Ain't" an excellent book.
    “There can be no higher law in journalism than to tell the truth and to shame the devil.” Walter Lippmann

    "Fill in any figure you want for that boy (Mantle). Whatever the figure, it's a deal." - Branch Rickey

  • #2
    Originally posted by 1905 Giants View Post
    Anybody got any particularly good 19th Century baseball book recommendations?

    The one I've read is "Where They Ain't" an excellent book.
    What do you like to read about?...Major leagues, histories, biographies, or other topics?
    "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
    "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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    • #3
      Originally posted by TonyK View Post
      What do you like to read about?...Major leagues, histories, biographies, or other topics?
      Histories mostly.
      “There can be no higher law in journalism than to tell the truth and to shame the devil.” Walter Lippmann

      "Fill in any figure you want for that boy (Mantle). Whatever the figure, it's a deal." - Branch Rickey

      Comment


      • #4
        I loved Peter Morris' "But Didn't We Have Fun," it's a history of baseball from 1843-1870. It delves a lot into the culture of the game and how it changed, what happened int he shift from amateur to pro ball, etc.. Really enlightening and helpful in putting together a picture of how the game evolved. (Especially helpful for the early parts of my alternate hsitories in my sig.)
        If Baseball Integrated Early - baseball integrated from the beginning - and "Brotherhood and baseball," the U.S. history companion, at http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Baseballifsandmore - IBIE updated for 2011.

        "Full House Chronology" at yahoo group fullhousefreaks & fullhouse4life with help of many fans, thanks for the input

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        • #5
          59 in '84- Historical account of Charlie Radbourn, the 1884 Providence Grays, and an uncovered tale of jealousy and love. Brings a formerly obscure character to life through primary sources and on-site research, as the author (Ed Achorn) writes for the Providence Journal. In addition, the book paints the picture of a casual 19th Century day, especially at the ballpark. Highly recommended.

          Old-Time Baseball - Great start-up for anyone new to the 19th Century game. Chronicles significant rules, teams, leagues, characters, equipment, and customs across the later half of the century in an easily digestible format.

          Spalding's World Tour- Meticulously researched account of baseball's only true "World Series." It follows the exploits of Al Spalding's Cubs and a an all-star, "All-America" team barnstorming across the globe. From Hawaii to Egypt, the tour is filled with colorful personalities and humorous situations detailed by 19th Century newspapers and letters from the players themselves. All the while, it depicts the labor issues of the game, and the seeds sown that would blossom into the Players' League are revealed.

          The Summer of Beer and Whiskey- Ed Achorn's second 19th Century book is an account of the birth of the American Association by Chris von der Ahe along with the rowdy crowd it attracted. I have not read this one, but I recommend it nonetheless.

          Baseball in the Garden of Eden- Written by acclaimed baseball history John Thorn, this book dives deep into the roots of the game not only in America, but as a relative of medieval bat-and-ball games. It includes very little concerning the birth of the Major Leagues as we know it, the National League. The text is long and quite the dry read, often feeling repetitive, but is still a wonderfully researched account that may interest hardcore historians.

          Cap Anson- Well-researched biography that is an overall great read, particularly the author's coverage of Anson's "racism."

          Hopefully that tides you over a while. Let me know if you'd like more info.
          "Allen Sutton Sothoron pitched his initials off today."--1920s article

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          • #6
            The Beer and Whisky League: The Illustrated History of the American Association--Baseball's Renegade Major League by David Nemec

            The Great Encyclopedia of Nineteenth-Century Major League Baseball by David Nemec

            The Rank and File of 19th Century Major League Baseball: Biographies of 1,084 Players, Owners, Managers and Umpires by David Nemec

            Where They Ain't: The Fabled Life and Ultimely Death of the Original Baltimore Orioles, the Team that Gave Birth to Modern Baseball by Burt Solomon

            A Game of Brawl: The Orioles, the Beaneaters, and the Battle for the 1897 Pennant by Bill Felber

            Players and Teams of the National Association, 1871-1875 by Paul Batesel

            Nineteenth Century Baseball: Year-By-Year Statistics for the Major League Teams, 1871 Through 1900 by Marshall D. Wright

            Tale of Four Cities: Nineteenth Century Baseball's Most Exciting Season; in Contemporary Accounts by Jean-Pierre Cailut (1889 Season)

            Long Before the Dodgers: Baseball in Brooklyn, 1855-1884 by James L. Terry

            The League that Lasted: 1876 and the Founding of the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs by Neil W. Macdonald

            When the Dodgers Were Bridegrooms: Gunner McGunnigle and Brooklyn's Back-to-Back Pennants of 1889 and 1890 by Ronald G. Shafer
            Axes grind and maces clash!

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