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Baseball's famous outfielders by Ira Smith (1954) (312 pages)

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  • Baseball's famous outfielders by Ira Smith (1954) (312 pages)

    Sorry if there is another thread on this book, but I didn't find one with the search engine...

    Has anybody read this book? I've got a personal project looking at the 1920's/1930's outfielders, and I'm looking especially for how the contemporaries viewed outfielders' defense. I'm wondering if this book examines defense at all, or even if it is an adult book. I don't mind taking a chance if I get no response, but I thought I'd be smart and ask first. I haven't found any online reviews....
    I never saw anything like it. He doesn't just hit pitchers, he takes away their dignity.(Don Sutton speaking about Willie Stargell)
    Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

    Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

    Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

  • #2
    I finally was able to get a copy of this book.

    Physical dimensions: 7.5"x5" or so, gives 5-6 pages on 9 outfielders from 1872-1899, 9 from 1900 to 1917, 24 from 1918-1940, 8 from 1941-1954 (published date 1954). The big name players are covered, but you also get a lot of secondary guys (Dummy Hoy, Paul Hines, Doc Cramer, Dixie Walker, etc.)

    The stats given for each player tell year, team, league, position, games, BA. That is it. Wow, not even HR and RBI.

    The book isn't an in depth book about statistics or anything like that, but for each player there is usually one longer story, some short tidbits, a paragraph or two biography, and a summary of their most important achievements (batting titles, World Series, records, etc.). It also humanizes the players, and you get a feel for their personalities.

    I was hoping for a bit more on the defensive accomplishments on the players. For some, they go into fair detail (relative to a 5-6 page article), but some hardly touch on their gloves. But I'd highly recommend this book, as it really gives you a feel of what the players were like as human beings and gives stories which would be lost to time.

    Lastly, it puts emphasis on BA, but the author wasn't an uneducated BA/HR/RBI only guy. He makes points on things like how a certain ballplayer never led the league in fielding percentage, because he covered more ground than other players and his errors were usually on balls he could barely reach with his glove, and that other players would never even get there to make an error. He states the extra range is worth a few more errors. So he knew what we often discuss, but in a common sense as opposed to numbers approach. Although so far, not too much on walks. A good read.
    I never saw anything like it. He doesn't just hit pitchers, he takes away their dignity.(Don Sutton speaking about Willie Stargell)
    Play the Who am I? game in trivia and you can make this signature line yours for 3 days (baseball signatures only!)

    Go here for a link to all player links! http://www.baseball-fever.com/forum/...player-threads

    Go here for all your 1920's/1930's OF info

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