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Players Who Deserve Their Own Biopics

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  • Stieb37
    replied
    Just recently finished Buzzie Bavasi's book and over 3/4 done with Graig Nettles book. Both are very interesting and show both sides when it comes to player salaries. Although Nettles was no fan of Steinbrenner handing out big deals to players who weren't part of the winning team the season before. Also Bavasi said that Drysdale and Koufax holding out actually cost raises for their teammates. I highly recommend both.

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  • Stieb37
    replied
    Originally posted by Floyd Gondolli View Post
    Rube Waddell
    Christy Mathewson
    Hal Chase

    Would each make for outstanding movies, if handled properly.

    PS: “The Catcher Was A Spy” (Moe Berg) was excellent, IMHO. Even in it involved very little about baseball, per se.
    Rube Waddell could have some humor to it like when he left games chasing fire trucks.

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  • Floyd Gondolli
    replied
    Rube Waddell
    Christy Mathewson
    Hal Chase

    Would each make for outstanding movies, if handled properly.

    PS: “The Catcher Was A Spy” (Moe Berg) was excellent, IMHO. Even in it involved very little about baseball, per se.

    Leave a comment:


  • StarStar00
    replied
    Originally posted by Phantom Dreamer View Post
    It wasn't any believable then. Same thing with Gary Cooper playing Gehrig. History is not kind to those old films.
    Cooper was one of the best casting picks in a baseball movie. He facially resembled Gehrig, roughly the same size (Cooper 6-3 and Gehrig 6-1), their voices were similar, and Cooper was good enough athletically most of the closeup baseball scenes (there weren't that many) were at least reasonably believable. (Although he certainly wasn't believable as a college-age kid.)

    The storyline was typical hackneyed 1940s stuff focusing on Gehrig's goofy parents, whirlwind romance with Eleanor, the cliche sportswriter buddy, and spending about 15 minutes total on his illness and death (yet never depicting him as visibly affected beyond loss of playing ability), and also never mentioned any friction whatsoever between Gehrig and Babe Ruth (probably necessary to get Ruth to act in the movie).

    But considering when it was made, POTY still stands as one of the best baseball movies ever.

    The next great baseball biopic should be Bill Veeck.

    Jesse Eisenberg could play the younger 20s-40s Veeck (from his days with the Cubs through Milwaukee, Cleveland and St. Louis), and then Robert Wuhl could play the older Veeck of both White Sox tenures. (Wuhl would be a better match overall but he's 68 now and couldn't pass for a 20s-30s Veeck of the 1940s.)

    For something like 30 years now, Bill Murray has been occasionally mentioned as a possibility for a Veeck movie but it's never gotten done. But he's 69 now and couldn't pass for a younger Veeck (and doesn't resemble him much anyway). Although maybe he could play the 70-plus Veeck sitting in the Wrigley Field bleachers in his final few years in kind of a bittersweet closing sequence.

    Michael Rapaport, now 50, maybe could play Veeck for his whole career. Other than planting the Wrigley ivy and getting his leg mangled in WWII, it wouldn't require many action scenes in his younger years.

    The Veeck story is pretty entertaining, his battles with the other team owners -- especially the Yankees -- were legendary (which could lead to problems with MLB approving logo and uniform use, etc etc). "Moneyball" and "Draft Day" showed there is some audience for behind-the-scenes sports movies focusing on management.
    Last edited by StarStar00; 05-03-2020, 06:11 PM.

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  • pedrosrotatorcuff
    replied
    I am surprised that there does not exist a series in the vein of A Football Life for pro baseball figures. Sure, every NFL player and their next-locker-over guy has a dedicated episode (or two in some cases), but it is still a great series, and there would be no shortage of interesting baseball subjects for such a series.

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  • Stieb37
    replied
    Let's get a Honus Wagner movie.

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  • StorminTAZZ
    replied
    Chick Stahl would be someone I would like to see a biopic about. He is a local guy too.

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  • bsomberg
    replied
    Most of the baseball biopics were made some time ago. The only recent one I can think of is Jackie Robinson. The old ones were probably good for their time and I still enjoy watching them when I can find them. But none of them were great movies (by today's standards). I think Roberto Clemente would be a very compelling story. Is biography by David Maraniss is perhaps the best baseball book I have read.

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  • abolishthedh
    replied
    Since they are not mentioned yet, and since both players were born in Alabama, Willie May's or Hank Aaron would make for interesting biopics.

    Alabama, for anyone too young to know, was Ground Zero for civil rights through history's rear view mirror. We can thank Birmingham's Sheriff Bull Conner for that. My point in mentioning either Mays or Aaron is that while Conner and his ilk strutted around, two nearby youngsters were preparing for careers in the game that kids across America would dream about.

    Each of them have a biography which mentions a high school football game where both suited up, but neither of them played. Both of them were recognized for having a future in the Negro Leagues in their high school days.

    Willie was the genuine star turned icon while in uniform. Of course, Hank would have the more captivating ending to the film.

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  • PF#9
    replied
    Pete Rose, The movie would be called Every Rose Has Its Thorn.

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  • bluesky5
    replied
    Originally posted by sturg1dj View Post

    I would say if they did a truthful movie about Ruth that showed his flaws, but also showed how much an athletic freak he was early would be nice.

    The two most memorable movies both present the idea that Ruth was a fat guy who could hit, which misses the mark.

    But I agree with the rest.

    We do not need to see another film about Cobb being crabby, and the Black Sox have been done right IMO. Also, what would be the arc of the Ted Williams movie? I mean sure, he served in two wars which is totally interesting, but what is his low point? Would the movie be

    1) Ted is amazing hitter
    2) Ted goes to war
    3) Ted is amazing hitter
    4) Ted goes to war
    5) Ted is amazing hitter
    6) Ted goes fishing

    while arguing with journalists?

    Sounds boring, haha.
    His low point would no doubt be relationships with family in general; particularly his youth and relationship with his mother.

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  • ProfessionalLollyGagger
    replied
    Mickey Mantle 6.8.0

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  • sturg1dj
    replied
    Originally posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
    who I DON'T want to see or hear any more about:
    1) Cobb
    2) Ruth
    3) The Black Sox
    4) Ted Williams
    I would say if they did a truthful movie about Ruth that showed his flaws, but also showed how much an athletic freak he was early would be nice.

    The two most memorable movies both present the idea that Ruth was a fat guy who could hit, which misses the mark.

    But I agree with the rest.

    We do not need to see another film about Cobb being crabby, and the Black Sox have been done right IMO. Also, what would be the arc of the Ted Williams movie? I mean sure, he served in two wars which is totally interesting, but what is his low point? Would the movie be

    1) Ted is amazing hitter
    2) Ted goes to war
    3) Ted is amazing hitter
    4) Ted goes to war
    5) Ted is amazing hitter
    6) Ted goes fishing

    while arguing with journalists?

    Sounds boring, haha.

    Leave a comment:


  • sturg1dj
    replied
    Originally posted by Phantom Dreamer View Post
    It wasn't any believable then. Same thing with Gary Cooper playing Gehrig. History is not kind to those old films.
    Old hollywood was always really bad at the sports parts of sports movies. The Babe Ruth Story comes to mind (even though the John Goodman version is probably worse). But Anthony Perkins (Fear Strikes Out) and Tab Hunter (Damn Yankees (not a bio pic, but a baseball musical)) showed that producers thought baseball realism was secondary, haha.

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  • Gold Pinstripes
    replied
    Originally posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
    Clemente is an all time favorite of mine but he made some serious errors in judgement that led to his own death

    I don't claim 100% accurate recall from the Bio I read 10-12 years ago, but

    1) he did not add himself as security to a plane of items going to Nicaragua but tried to do something on his own, although he knew nothing about airplanes, airplane and flight safety etc
    2) he commandeered an old airplane in poor shape that had not been used in a while that was just sitting on the side of an airport, it was not a wise choice
    3) he found a pilot who might be able to fly the plane but the pilot was not particularly good and had little or no experience with the airplane, it was not a wise choice
    4) the plane was WAY overloaded - way too much weight
    5) even then, the weight was not distributed properly, the plane was even seen bulging in an odd way on the runway
    6) the plane had difficulty starting and firing properly
    7) etc etc

    for all his desire to help earthquake victims which was very commendable, he made a series of very poor and odd choices that led directly to his death
    We weren't there, but it was a very chaotic situation, and Clemente was counting on other people to do their jobs. Anytime we talk about lack of judgment, the recent case of Jose Fernandez comes to mind. I think Clemente's biggest mistake was trusting other people, but he thought the relief supplies could save lives, so he pushed on for the flight.

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