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Why your rookie card might not be a rookie card...

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  • #31
    It is all about popularity of the card in my opinion. Values are not necessarily tied to a first year card anymore, sometimes second year cards can be worth even more. For example the 2004-05 Topps Chrome LeBron James second year card is worth more than many of his regular rookie cards.
    Baseball cards, sports cards & My Baseball Card Space website are my favorite hobbies.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by PatNYM View Post
      When I think of rookie cards, I think of the card after their rookie year. Darryl Strawberry was NL ROY in 1983. His "rookie cards" were the 84 sets. Yes, some considered the 83 Topps Traded or Fleer Update as his true rookie, but those were so rare and I knew very few people who cared about the Topps Traded or Fleer Update cards.
      I remember the controversy over whether cards from Traded sets should be considered as "legitimate" rookie cards, since they were not available in packs but only from dealers, and in complete sets only. For a while Beckett was designating such cards as "XRC," which I think meant 'extended rookie card' or something like that. For a generation accustomed to getting cards only through packs, the idea of Topps producing a hobby-only set was a big culture shock.

      Originally posted by PatNYM View Post
      IWhat turned me off was a rookie card of a player that hadn't played yet. In early 1992 ,I was about 15 maybe already 16, I walked into a card store in my town. Saw they had a Brien Taylor rookie for $25. I asked the guy working there and he tried to sell me on how it will be worth $50 by the end of the year. I said, "$25 for a card of someone who has never even thrown a pitch in the pros?" He even showed me the price guide and it was listed for $30. I walked out of the store and I was done with cards.
      That's nothing compared to the 2010 Bowman Steven Strasburg superfractor, a 1-of-1 card that sold at auction for over $16,000 - before Strasburg ever threw a pitch in the Majors. (Link)

      strasburgsuper1.jpg

      But wait, there's more! The guy who bought the card sold it a month later... for $25,000! (Link)
      X
      What's THAT guy doing?
      - one of the YES Network broadcasters, after the camera cut to me doing the thumbs-down after Todd Frazier's home run

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Gary Dunaier View Post

        I remember the controversy over whether cards from Traded sets should be considered as "legitimate" rookie cards, since they were not available in packs but only from dealers, and in complete sets only. For a while Beckett was designating such cards as "XRC," which I think meant 'extended rookie card' or something like that. For a generation accustomed to getting cards only through packs, the idea of Topps producing a hobby-only set was a big culture shock.



        That's nothing compared to the 2010 Bowman Steven Strasburg superfractor, a 1-of-1 card that sold at auction for over $16,000 - before Strasburg ever threw a pitch in the Majors. (Link)

        strasburgsuper1.jpg

        But wait, there's more! The guy who bought the card sold it a month later... for $25,000! (Link)
        Yeah, I didn't even know about the Traded or Fleer Update sets until late 1986 after I moved to LI and actually visited a card shop.

        The Stassburg is a different story as it was 1 card, so the guy had the only one. Me? I also laugh at that, as I would simply make my own in photoshop, frame it and call it a day. But, at least with that I can understand.

        I remember reading about how Johnny Bench had 1 rookie Card. George Brett had 1 rookie card. Dwight Gooden had 2-5 (depending on the person's opinion of the traded and update sets), and Albert Pujols had something like 35, and only 2 were worth the cardboard on which they were printed.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by PatNYM View Post
          The Stassburg is a different story as it was 1 card, so the guy had the only one.
          Yeah, it was a 1-of-1, but still... sixteen thousand dollars for a card of a minor leaguer?

          Originally posted by PatNYM View Post
          I remember reading about how Johnny Bench had 1 rookie Card. George Brett had 1 rookie card. Dwight Gooden had 2-5 (depending on the person's opinion of the traded and update sets), and Albert Pujols had something like 35, and only 2 were worth the cardboard on which they were printed.
          These days the only baseball card brands I have an interest in are the regular Topps set, the Topps "Opening Day" set (which is the same as the regular set except for some subtle differences - and they're less expensive), and the Topps Heritage, which puts today's stars in the design of 49 years ago. Even then, I just buy a few packs when they come out. So all the other high-end and high-roller and high-you-must-be-to-pay-that-much-for-a-pack-of-new-cards sets are pretty much off my radar.
          X
          What's THAT guy doing?
          - one of the YES Network broadcasters, after the camera cut to me doing the thumbs-down after Todd Frazier's home run

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          • #35
            I have completely lost interest in cards. I thought the Daily Topps stuff were cool, bought a few of those last year, but even that got old quick.

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            • #36
              I agree... Topps Now is a great concept but the're just too expensive. $9.99 for one card. They're cheaper if you buy multiples, but still... if I want to "own the moment" I'll make a screen capture from the actual broadcast, as accessed via mlb.tv.
              X
              What's THAT guy doing?
              - one of the YES Network broadcasters, after the camera cut to me doing the thumbs-down after Todd Frazier's home run

              Comment

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