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  • #16
    Originally posted by Zito75
    Insanefishpossay- IM me sometime and let me know if you are looking for anything.

    Do you have AIM?

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    • #17
      Ok I just figured out what's happened to card collecting and why the hobby has been ruined...# of card sets listed in Beckett for 2003: 86 DIFFERENT SETS. # of sets in 1993: 15. # of sets in 1990: 7. # of sets in 1983: 3. # of sets in 1980: 1.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by 1984Tigers
        Ok I just figured out what's happened to card collecting and why the hobby has been ruined...# of card sets listed in Beckett for 2003: 86 DIFFERENT SETS. # of sets in 1993: 15. # of sets in 1990: 7. # of sets in 1983: 3. # of sets in 1980: 1.
        Beckett Baseball Card Monthly
        I remember seeing how cards from, say, 1971 took up 1/3 of a page and cards from, say, 1996 took up maybe 10 pages. This was a few years back.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 1984Tigers
          Ok I just figured out what's happened to card collecting and why the hobby has been ruined...# of card sets listed in Beckett for 2003: 86 DIFFERENT SETS. # of sets in 1993: 15. # of sets in 1990: 7. # of sets in 1983: 3. # of sets in 1980: 1.
          I've noticed that too. I have a few complete sets from around 1991 or so, but I can't imagine trying to complete a full set today, with 5 billion different subsets, and half of the cards are #/100 or lower.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by insanefishpossay
            I've noticed that too. I have a few complete sets from around 1991 or so, but I can't imagine trying to complete a full set today, with 5 billion different subsets, and half of the cards are #/100 or lower.
            You know what upsets me the most...Besides ruining the hobby, these card companies have ruined the chance of kids ever being able to get autographs and memorabilia. At least 1/2 the sets they put out nowadays are sets in which the cards have some piece of memorabilia on the card...They'll either have an autograph, a piece of thread from a uniform, sawdust from a bat the player used, etc.
            So now it's nearly impossible to get autographs, used game stuff, etc. Because they are paying these players big money to save this stuff for the card companies. And as a result anybody that sells this stuff is wanting WAY TOO MUCH money for it, and on top of that now there is no such thing as a player just signing autographs anymore. Now they demand $20-100 bucks just to sign something. I remember back in the day (we're talking barely 10-15yrs ago here) where you could always find athletes doing signings and the ones that made you pay were the exception, not the rule. Even the ones that made you pay it usually wasn't too bad.
            I was looking through some listings for player signings and ALL OF THEM CHARGED to get autos, and the cheapest ones I found were like $15-30 bucks. Even that was only for a "flat item" (i.e. card or photo), they even base fee's on what they sign! And this was for guys who weren't even stars! Guys who outside the area they played are pretty much unknown!
            I remember buying a George Brett signed American League baseball for $10 bucks back somewhere around '92-94. Now you'll pay AT LEAST $100 bucks for the same thing! You can't even get a ball signed by a scrub player for less than $25!
            It's because the card companies have completely turned it into a money-making business for themselves and the athletes.
            That used to be one of the great things about baseball...Yeah it's always had elements of it, but it wasn't 100% like that. Now it's the ONLY way things are done, rather than the way it is sometimes!

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            • #21
              You will also notice that because of the internet(ebay especially),that many of the baseball card shops are going out of business.They just can't compete anymore.My favorite shop just a couple of blocks from my house went out of business last summer.

              Unfortunately, the hobby,like any other industry,is money driven.Gone forever are the days of $.99 packs,(which in the late 80s was unheard of) with the stick of gum,which usually shattered before eating it.

              As for autogtraphs.I don't mind paying for one,within financial reason of course,knowing that I will actually get to see that person sign the item at the show.I will absolutely never buy an autograph from a 3rd party.

              The last autograph that I paid for was Dick Allen in Chicago a couple of years ago.I could not have met a nicer person.He was my favorite White Sox player in the 70s.The experience was well worth the $39.

              He even complimented me on my '72 road jersey that I wore.

              As far as cards are concerned,Topps is the only ones I go with.I'll be very happy if I ever complete my 1973 Topps set.

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              • #22
                The problem with "The Hobby", IMO, is that today's kids learn the wrong lessons. Today's kids learn lessons about commercialism from their collecting, whereas I learned lessons about human nature. For example, when a friend gave me his older brother's collection (gave it !), upon learning about my dad's terminal illness. (This brother was 10 years older anyway). Or, when my grandmother gave away my 1960s cards to my cousin across her hometown because she was cleaning things out and we visited too seldom. These lessons about human nature are valuable, invaluable actually. Lessons about commercialism can't compare with such stuff. Gloss cannot compare with dusty childhood recollections.

                That said, I have kept about 400 cards from scrubs and over the hill stars which were not worth as much. The memories I have of my childhood are priceless when I look at, say, Clay Kirby, and I think of how in 1971 he seemed like the second coming of Tom Seaver. Or, Nate Colbert, Clarence Gaston, Ralph Garr, Bernie Carbo, Buzz Capra, ...... The price guide gives prices which are a fraction of the value of the childhood memories I have. We used to believe here in Missouri that Ted Simmons was twice the catcher that Carlton Fisk or Thurman Munson ever would be.

                If kids don't hold on to their cards long enough, or hold on to their cards for financial gain, then the memories they create from "The Hobby" are all wrong. How can someone look at Arod's rookie card and seriously say to a childhood bud, "Wow, remember when we planned to buy college textbooks on this?"

                I'd rather admit to thinking Clay Kirby was the next Tom Seaver.
                Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

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                • #23
                  As the number of sets increased over the years, the more I stayed with vintage cards. The problem there is that graded cards are usually so expensive now. Try to get a HOFer in PSA 8 or higher. There is a Ted Williams, 59 Fleer set, all graded as PSA 9, selling on eBay right now. Still more than a day left and the set is up to $15,000. I'll bet it goes for the high teens. How can us regular folk, who buy cards for the love of baseball, afford those kind of prices? Well, I suppose it means one settles for PSA 6 and 7. As least this is my method. Sometimes I even buy lower rated cards just so I can have one and look at it. I rarely sell cards. Anyway, the highly graded cards are being gobbled up by investors. Really, anything above PSA 7 and I consider it is spectator sport (hobby).

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by DodgersFan1961
                    As the number of sets increased over the years, the more I stayed with vintage cards. The problem there is that graded cards are usually so expensive now. Try to get a HOFer in PSA 8 or higher. There is a Ted Williams, 59 Fleer set, all graded as PSA 9, selling on eBay right now. Still more than a day left and the set is up to $15,000. I'll bet it goes for the high teens. How can us regular folk, who buy cards for the love of baseball, afford those kind of prices? Well, I suppose it means one settles for PSA 6 and 7. As least this is my method. Sometimes I even buy lower rated cards just so I can have one and look at it. I rarely sell cards. Anyway, the highly graded cards are being gobbled up by investors. Really, anything above PSA 7 and I consider it is spectator sport (hobby).
                    There have always been grumblings about cards becoming "investments", and "investors" ruining the hobby. I think we've finally just realized it to it's fullest. When cards "skyrocketing" overnight in value wasn't enough for "investors" and the people in the hobby purely for making money, now they 'grade' cards. And they've also turned to the memorabilia and autograph market and completely destroyed that. I saw an ad the other day in I think Beckett, the ad was for The Alex Rodriguez Corporation or something like that. It was some company that is partnered with A-Rod and basically their entire purpose is selling A-Rod autographs. They had it down to a science, charging based on what he signed, the size of it, if he signed anything more than his name it cost more, if it was over so many letters it cost more, if the item wasn't flat it cost more, if the picture was in color it cost more, etc. At that point it's a business, it's no longer a hobby. They've done the same thing to cards, with the graded crap, 50 sets put out by 30 different companies every year...

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by abolishthedh
                      The problem with "The Hobby", IMO, is that today's kids learn the wrong lessons. Today's kids learn lessons about commercialism from their collecting, whereas I learned lessons about human nature. For example, when a friend gave me his older brother's collection (gave it !), upon learning about my dad's terminal illness. (This brother was 10 years older anyway). Or, when my grandmother gave away my 1960s cards to my cousin across her hometown because she was cleaning things out and we visited too seldom. These lessons about human nature are valuable, invaluable actually. Lessons about commercialism can't compare with such stuff. Gloss cannot compare with dusty childhood recollections.

                      That said, I have kept about 400 cards from scrubs and over the hill stars which were not worth as much. The memories I have of my childhood are priceless when I look at, say, Clay Kirby, and I think of how in 1971 he seemed like the second coming of Tom Seaver. Or, Nate Colbert, Clarence Gaston, Ralph Garr, Bernie Carbo, Buzz Capra, ...... The price guide gives prices which are a fraction of the value of the childhood memories I have. We used to believe here in Missouri that Ted Simmons was twice the catcher that Carlton Fisk or Thurman Munson ever would be.

                      If kids don't hold on to their cards long enough, or hold on to their cards for financial gain, then the memories they create from "The Hobby" are all wrong. How can someone look at Arod's rookie card and seriously say to a childhood bud, "Wow, remember when we planned to buy college textbooks on this?"

                      I'd rather admit to thinking Clay Kirby was the next Tom Seaver.
                      I've never heard (or read) it so eloquently stated.

                      Beautiful.
                      If I had only spent a tenth of the time studying Physics that I spent learning Star Wars and Baseball trivia, I would have won the Nobel Prize.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by 1984Tigers

                        Can anybody who's been in it since at least late 80's have any opinions on what happened to change the hobby so much?
                        One Nine Nine Four.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by MikeCameronFAN
                          Cancel your subscription to Beckett and just look on eBay, because isn't eBay a true reflection of the market? I always laugh when Beckett says a card is "worth" $80 when it's selling on eBay for $20.
                          I agree. Ebay is the new price guide.

                          Since I collect cards with the intention of trying to get them autographed, I typically am only interested in the "base sets." You can usually get them pretty inexpensively on the Bay. I get a set of Topps, Topps Total, Topps Heritage, and Bowman Heritage (the last two are great sets). Then when a team comes to Denver, I will pull a card for each player on the 25-man roster and head off to Coors Field.

                          I also collect stadium seats (the actual seat, not a card with a piece of a seat glued onto it) and Red Sox related items. If you collect what interests you, then you'll enjoy it.

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                          • #28
                            I agree. A collector accumulates anything in quantity because of its intrinsic appeal. Each one of my eight, pack bought, scuffed and battered '75 Joe Morgan cards is WORTH something to me. Each and every one. They have nearly as much time on this planet as I do, and are much more widely recognized by a great deal more people.
                            smoker

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                            • #29
                              One word sums up best what the hobby has become: chrome. At one time, a company would produce the simple basic set. Then they started making these chrome cards of the exact same original product. Now, some companies make 20-30 different releases in the same year. Bottom line, there has been an excessive number of releases. And I have seen most of these additional sets, and the designs are not that great.

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                              • #30
                                I went to card show when I was in Cleveland and it seemed like about 75% of the cards in the dealers cases were inserts. I know they are popular, but I could care less about them.

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