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  • Box Panel Cards

    I was just curious about the box panel cards that were on the bottom of hobby boxes during the '80s/'90s. Are these cards collectible in any way, or do you consider them as apart of the box that you toss in the trash or use to keep other cards in?

    A couple of notes that I found interesting about them was that in 1989 Topps included Don Sutton on a box panel, but he was never apart of the base set.

    Also, recently a 1986 Topps George Brett box panel #C was graded PSA 9 and sold on ebay for over $40 shipped. So, PSA actually grades these hand cut panels!!
    My collection of autographs: TTM Autos

  • #2
    I remember one box bottom card, it must have been from 1987 but I could be wrong, that showed Bill Buckner at Shea during the World Series. It wasn't a "World Series" card, it was a regular Bill Buckner card that just happened to show him in a road uniform, and the Shea Home Run Apple was in the background. Interesting.
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    - one of the YES Network broadcasters, after the camera cut to me doing the thumbs-down after Todd Frazier's home run

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Extra Innings View Post
      I was just curious about the box panel cards that were on the bottom of hobby boxes during the '80s/'90s. Are these cards collectible in any way, or do you consider them as apart of the box that you toss in the trash or use to keep other cards in?
      They're considered oddballs, but they're no less "collectible" than any other card. I don't think any companies have really done them since about 1992. They were pretty easy to get since the stores (maybe not hobby shops) were always happy to unload something they saw as garbage to a customer who asked. Finding them in decent condition is a challenge since they were on the bottom of the box, which typically experienced the most wear of any part of the box, so they were often creased, stained or had extensive surface wear. And the there was always the matter of how to cut them apart so they were straight, but you didn't see the little black line separating the cards.

      I don't see any possible way to have one of these graded as a perfect 10, though.
      Clyde's Stale Cards - A blog about the international world of baseball cards.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DaClyde View Post
        They're considered oddballs, but they're no less "collectible" than any other card. I don't think any companies have really done them since about 1992. They were pretty easy to get since the stores (maybe not hobby shops) were always happy to unload something they saw as garbage to a customer who asked. Finding them in decent condition is a challenge since they were on the bottom of the box, which typically experienced the most wear of any part of the box, so they were often creased, stained or had extensive surface wear. And the there was always the matter of how to cut them apart so they were straight, but you didn't see the little black line separating the cards.

        I don't see any possible way to have one of these graded as a perfect 10, though.
        Thanks for the input. That's kind of what I figured them to be. Its still crazy to see a grading company actually give out grades for these.
        My collection of autographs: TTM Autos

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