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  • 1977 New York Yankees: 100-62, .617, 2.5 g ahead, (WS: W 4-2 over Dodgers)---BB-Ref

    Top Row: L-R: Carlos May (DH), Ken Holtzman (P), Dick Tidrow (P), Chris Chambliss (1B).

    Standing: L-R: Gerry Murphy (Traveling Secretery), Gene Monaham (trainer), Craig Nettles (3B), Reggie Jackson (RF), Albert 'Sparky' Lyle (RP), Mickey Klutts (3B), Mike Torrez (P), Ron Guidry (P), George Zeber (2B), William Randolf (2B), Lou Piniella (coach), Don Gullett (P), Ken Clay (RP), Gil Patterson (RP), Ed Figueroa (P), Cliff Johnson (DH), Paul Blair (OF), Herman Schneider (trainer).

    Bottom: L-R: Russell 'Bucky' Dent (SS), Ray White (LF), Art Fowler, Cloyd Boyer, Dick Howser, Billy Martin (Mgr.), Elston Howard (coach), Bobby Cox (coach), Yogi Berra (coach), Fred Stanley (coach), Thurman Munson (C), Fran Healy (coach), Catfish Hunter (P).

    Seated on ground: L-R: Batboys: Joe D'Ambrosio, Felix Martinez, John Caldaras. Absent: Mickey Rivers, Pete Sheely
    (equipment mgr.)
    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 03-14-2009, 05:26 PM.
    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

    Comment


    • 1989 Oakland Athletics: 99-63, .611, 7 g ahead, (WS: W 4-0 over Giants)---BB-Ref
      Last edited by Bill Burgess; 03-14-2009, 05:30 PM.
      "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

      ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

      Comment


      • 1998 New York Yankees: 114-48, .704, 22 g ahead, (WS: W 4-0 over Padres)---BB-Ref

        Top Row: L-R: Dale Svewn (1B), Paul O'Neil (RP), Andy Pettitte (P), Tino Martinez (1B), Bernie Williams (CF), Graeme Lloyd (P), Derek Jeter (SS), Hideki Irabu (P), Orlando Hernandez (P), Chili Davis (DH), David Wells (P), Darryl Strawberry (DH).

        3rd Row: L-R: Darren Holmes(RP), Chad Curtis (LF), Joe Girardi (C), Scot Brosius (3B), Shane Spencer (RF/LF), Mike Stanton (P), Joe Borowski (P), Mike Buddie (P),Mariano Rivera (RP), Ramiro Mendoza (P), Jorge Posada (C), Jeff Nelson (P).

        2nd Row: L-R: Dr. Stuart Hershon (Team Physician), Gene Monahan (Head Trainer), Rob Cucuzza (Equipment Mgr.), Tim Raines (DH/OF), Chuck Knoblauch (2B), Homer Bush (2B/DH), Luis Sojo (SS/1B), Jay Tessmer, David Cone (P), Nick Tesla (Batting Practice Pitcher), Lou Cucuzza, Jr. (Visiting Club House Mgr.), Steve Donahue (Trainer), David Szen (Traveling Secretery), Jeff Mangold (Strength & Conditioning Coach.

        Bottom Row: L-R: Mike Borzello (Batting Practice Pitcher), Mel Stottlemyre (coach), Willie Randolph (coach), Tony Coninger (coach), Don Zimmer (coach), Joe Torre (Mgr.), Chris Chambliss (coac]), Joe Cardenal (coach), Charlie Wansowicz (Batting Practice Pitcher), Gary Tuck (coach), Rohan Baicher (massage therapist).

        Seated: -(Batboys): Dave Powell, Mike Roth, Joe Lee, Dave Roberts, Luis Costillo
        .

        Last edited by Bill Burgess; 03-14-2009, 05:33 PM.
        "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

        ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

        Comment


        • -------------------------------------
          Last edited by Bill Burgess; 11-20-2006, 01:17 PM.
          "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

          ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

          Comment


          • -------------------------------------------
            Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-28-2008, 07:20 AM.
            "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

            ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

            Comment


            • ----------------------------------------
              Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-06-2007, 05:25 PM.

              Comment


              • -----------------------------
                Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-06-2007, 04:09 PM.

                Comment


                • -------------------------------------
                  Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-06-2007, 04:10 PM.

                  Comment


                  • ----------------------------------
                    Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-06-2007, 04:07 PM.
                    "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

                    ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

                    Comment


                    • -----------------------------------
                      Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-06-2007, 04:44 PM.

                      Comment


                      • --------------------------------------SOME OF THE GREAT CLASSIC BALLPARKS

                        Yankee Stadium:
                        Home of the New York Yankees
                        Original Stadium: April 18, 1923 - September 30, 1973; 52 years.
                        Renovated Stadium: April 15, 1976 - September 21, 2008; 34 years.
                        Rebuilt: 1975
                        Original 1923 seating capacity: 58,000
                        Maximum 1928 seating capacity: 82,000
                        2006 seating capacity: 57,485
                        Night Lights installed: 1946

                        Wikipedia: Yankee Stadium

                        -----------1946-75



                        ---------1928 World Series.


                        ---------------------------------------1946-75------------------------------------------------------------------------1967


                        ----1946-75



                        New Yankee Stadium:
                        Home of the New York Yankees, April 16, 2009 - present
                        Original 2009 seating capacity: 50,086, (52,325, including standing room)
                        New Yankee Stadium wikipedia


                        Outside of New Yankee Stadium. Obviously trying to carry on the aura of the original pre-1975 renovation of original Yankee Stadium. Art deco building design.
                        Last edited by Bill Burgess; 11-11-2009, 02:49 PM.
                        "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

                        ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

                        Comment


                        • The fabled Polo Grounds:
                          Home of Baseball's New York Giants,

                          and the first home of the New York Mets.
                          It sits atop a steep escarpment that descends 175 feet below sea level.

                          Wikipedia: Polo Grounds

                          The Giants originally played in a polo field on 111th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues. Brush kept the name, Polo Grounds, when he moved the team to Coogan’s Bluff in 1891. In April 1911, the Polo Grounds, an elaborate wooden structure, burned to the ground. By October, the Giants were hosting the Philadelphia Athletics for the 1911 World Series in a rebuilt stadium of concrete and steel. The new Polo Grounds boasted box seats of Italian marble, ornamental American eagles on the balustrade, and blue and gold banners, 30 feet apart, flying from a cantilever roof. At the time, it was the premier Major League Baseball stadium.

                          The Polo Grounds hosted the:

                          New York Giants, June 28, 1911 - September 29, 1957; 52 years.
                          New York Yankees, May 30, 1912 - October 8, 1922;
                          New York Mets, April 13, 1962 - September 18, 1963.
                          Original 1891 seating capacity: 16,000
                          Rebuilt 1911 seating capacity: 34,000
                          Final 1963 seating capacity: 60,747
                          Photo taken between 1940-1964
                          Night Lights installed: 1940
                          Demolished: 1964

                          In 1957, the owner of the Giants, Horace Stoneham (1903-1990) broke many New York hearts when he announced that he was moving the Giants to San Francisco. The Polo Grounds remained for seven more years, serving as home to the New York Mets for the 1962 and 1963 seasons. In 1964 the stadium was demolished and now the Polo Grounds Towers, a housing project, occupies the site. All that is left of the original Polo Grounds is an old staircase on the side of the cliff that once led to the ticket booth.

                          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Around early 1920's, with boxing ring erected.



                          Candlestick Park: AKA 3Com Park
                          Home of the San Francisco Giants, April 12, 1960 - September 30, 1999; 39 years.
                          Original 1960 seating capacity: 43, 765
                          Final 1999 seating capacity: 63,000
                          Photo taken between 1940-1964
                          Wikipedia: Candlestick Park


                          Pac Bell Park: AKA SBC Park, Pacific Bell Park, officially renamed AT&T Park on March 1, 2006
                          Home of the San Francisco Giants, April 11, 2000 - present; 7 years.
                          Original 2000 seating capacity: 40,800
                          Photo taken: October 22, 2002, (World Series w/Angels)
                          Wikipedia: Pac Bell Park
                          Last edited by Bill Burgess; 02-28-2010, 07:13 AM.
                          "By common consent, Ruth was the hardest hitter of history; a fine fielder, if not a finished one; an inspired base runner, seeming to do the right thing without thinking. He had the most perfect co-ordination of any human animal I ever knew." - Hugh Fullerton, 1936 (Chicago sports writer, 1893-1930's)

                          ROY / ERA+ Title / Cy Young / WS MVP / HR Title / Gold Glove / Comeback POY / BA Title / MVP / All Star / HOF

                          Comment


                          • Fenway Park:
                            Home of the Boston Red Sox, April 20, 1912 - present; 99 years.
                            Original 1912 seating capacity: 35,000
                            Present: 33,871
                            Night Lights installed: 1947
                            Wikipedia: Fenway Park

                            ------------------------1917------------------------------------------------------------------------------1950 to present


                            ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------1940-46



                            Fenway Park before the second game of the World Series between The Boston Red Sox and the
                            St. Louis Cardinals, in Boston, Massachusetts, October 25, 2004.


                            October 12, 1914, World Series, Game 3.
                            Last edited by Bill Burgess; 09-10-2011, 01:17 PM.

                            Comment


                            • Comiskey Park I:
                              Home of Chicago White Sox, July 1, 1910 - September 30, 1990; 80 years
                              Original 1910 seating capacity: 32,000
                              Maximum 1952 seating capacity: 52,000
                              Final 1990 seating capacity: 43,951
                              Photo taken between 1950-1990
                              Night Lights installed: 1939
                              Demolished: 1991
                              Wikipedia: Comiskey Park


                              September 11, 1983


                              -----------------------June 4, 1983
                              Last edited by Bill Burgess; 04-24-2009, 08:35 AM.

                              Comment


                              • Forbes Field:
                                Home of Pittsburgh Pirates, June 30, 1909 - June 28, 1970; 61 years
                                Original 1909 seating capacity: 23,000
                                Maximum 1925 seating capacity: 41,000
                                Photo taken between 1940-1970
                                Night Lights installed 1940
                                Demolished: 1971
                                Wikipedia: Forbes Field

                                ----------------Notice in top photo, they're playing football.


                                October 13, 1925, World Series


                                -----October, 1966


                                Three Rivers Stadium:
                                Home of the Pittsburgh Pirates, July 16, 1970 - present; 37 years
                                Original 1970 seating capacity: 47, 687
                                Largest crowd: 59,568 (July 12, 1994, All-Star game)
                                Wikipedia: Three Rivers Stadium
                                Last edited by Bill Burgess; 08-14-2011, 03:00 PM.

                                Comment

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