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Updated Baseball Fever Policy

Baseball Fever Policy

I. Purpose of this announcement:

This announcement describes the policies pertaining to the operation of Baseball Fever.

Baseball Fever is a moderated baseball message board which encourages and facilitates research and information exchange among fans of our national pastime. The intent of the Baseball Fever Policy is to ensure that Baseball Fever remains an extremely high quality, extremely low "noise" environment.

Baseball Fever is administrated by three principal administrators:
webmaster - Baseball Fever Owner
The Commissioner - Baseball Fever Administrator
Macker - Baseball Fever Administrator

And a group of forum specific super moderators. The role of the moderator is to keep Baseball Fever smoothly and to screen posts for compliance with our policy. The moderators are ALL volunteer positions, so please be patient and understanding of any delays you might experience in correspondence.

II. Comments about our policy:

Any suggestions on this policy may be made directly to the webmaster.

III. Acknowledgments:

This document was based on a similar policy used by SABR.

IV. Requirements for participation on Baseball Fever:

Participation on Baseball Fever is available to all baseball fans with a valid email address, as verified by the forum's automated system, which then in turn creates a single validated account. Multiple accounts by a single user are prohibited.

By registering, you agree to adhere to the policies outlined in this document and to conduct yourself accordingly. Abuse of the forum, by repeated failure to abide by these policies, will result in your access being blocked to the forum entirely.

V. Baseball Fever Netiquette:

Participants at Baseball Fever are required to adhere to these principles, which are outlined in this section.
a. All posts to Baseball Fever should be written in clear, concise English, with proper grammar and accurate spelling. The use of abbreviations should be kept to a minimum; when abbreviation is necessary, they should be either well-known (such as etc.), or explained on their first use in your post.

b. Conciseness is a key attribute of a good post.

c. Quote only the portion of a post to which you are responding.

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e. It is our policy NOT to transmit any defamatory or illegal materials.

f. Personal attacks of any type against Baseball Fever readers will not be tolerated. In these instances the post will be copied by a moderator and/or administrator, deleted from the site, then sent to the member who made the personal attack via a Private Message (PM) along with a single warning. Members who choose to not listen and continue personal attacks will be banned from the site.

g. It is important to remember that many contextual clues available in face-to-face discussion, such as tone of voice and facial expression, are lost in the electronic forum. As a poster, try to be alert for phrasing that might be misinterpreted by your audience to be offensive; as a reader, remember to give the benefit of the doubt and not to take umbrage too easily. There are many instances in which a particular choice of words or phrasing can come across as being a personal attack where none was intended.

h. The netiquette described above (a-g) often uses the term "posts", but applies equally to Private Messages.

VI. Baseball Fever User Signature Policy

A signature is a piece of text that some members may care to have inserted at the end of ALL of their posts, a little like the closing of a letter. You can set and / or change your signature by editing your profile in the UserCP. Since it is visible on ALL your posts, the following policy must be adhered to:

Signature Composition
Font size limit: No larger than size 2 (This policy is a size 2)
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Lines: No more than 4 lines
Colors: Most colors are permissible, but those which are hard to discern against the gray background (yellow, white, pale gray) should be avoided
Images/Graphics: Allowed, but nothing larger than 20k and Content rules must be followed

Signature Content
No advertising is permitted
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A Link to your Baseball Fever Blog does not require written consent and is recommended
Quotes must be attributed. Non-baseball quotes are permissible as long as they are not religious or political

Please adhere to these rules when you create your signature. Failure to do so will result in a request to comply by a moderator. If you do not comply within a reasonable amount of time, the signature will be removed and / or edited by an Administrator. Baseball Fever reserves the right to edit and / or remove any or all of your signature line at any time without contacting the account holder.

VII. Appropriate and inappropriate topics for Baseball Fever:

Most concisely, the test for whether a post is appropriate for Baseball Fever is: "Does this message discuss our national pastime in an interesting manner?" This post can be direct or indirect: posing a question, asking for assistance, providing raw data or citations, or discussing and constructively critiquing existing posts. In general, a broad interpretation of "baseball related" is used.

Baseball Fever is not a promotional environment. Advertising of products, web sites, etc., whether for profit or not-for-profit, is not permitted. At the webmaster's discretion, brief one-time announcements for products or services of legitimate baseball interest and usefulness may be allowed. If advertising is posted to the site it will be copied by a moderator and/or administrator, deleted from the site, then sent to the member who made the post via a Private Message (PM) along with a single warning. Members who choose to not listen and continue advertising will be banned from the site. If the advertising is spam-related, pornography-based, or a "visit-my-site" type post / private message, no warning at all will be provided, and the member will be banned immediately without a warning.

It is considered appropriate to post a URL to a page which specifically and directly answers a question posted on the list (for example, it would be permissible to post a link to a page containing home-road splits, even on a site which has advertising or other commercial content; however, it would not be appropriate to post the URL of the main page of the site). The site reserves the right to limit the frequency of such announcements by any individual or group.

In keeping with our test for a proper topic, posting to Baseball Fever should be treated as if you truly do care. This includes posting information that is, to the best of your knowledge, complete and accurate at the time you post. Any errors or ambiguities you catch later should be acknowledged and corrected in the thread, since Baseball Fever is sometimes considered to be a valuable reference for research information.

VIII. Role of the moderator:

When a post is submitted to Baseball Fever, it is forwarded by the server automatically and seen immediately. The moderator may:
a. Leave the thread exactly like it was submitted. This is the case 95% of the time.

b. Immediately delete the thread as inappropriate for Baseball Fever. Examples include advertising, personal attacks, or spam. This is the case 1% of the time.

c. Move the thread. If a member makes a post about the Marlins in the Yankees forum it will be moved to the appropriate forum. This is the case 3% of the time.

d. Edit the message due to an inappropriate item. This is the case 1% of the time. There have been new users who will make a wonderful post, then add to their signature line (where your name / handle appears) a tagline that is a pure advertisement. This tagline will be removed, a note will be left in the message so he/she is aware of the edit, and personal contact will be made to the poster telling them what has been edited and what actions need to be taken to prevent further edits.

The moderators perform no checks on posts to verify factual or logical accuracy. While he/she may point out gross errors in factual data in replies to the thread, the moderator does not act as an "accuracy" editor. Also moderation is not a vehicle for censorship of individuals and/or opinions, and the moderator's decisions should not be taken personally.

IX. Legal aspects of participation in Baseball Fever:

By submitting a post to Baseball Fever, you grant Baseball Fever permission to distribute your message to the forum. Other rights pertaining to the post remain with the ORIGINAL author, and you may not redistribute or retransmit any posts by any others, in whole or in part, without the express consent of the original author.

The messages appearing on Baseball Fever contain the opinions and views of their respective authors and are not necessarily those of Baseball Fever, or of the Baseball Almanac family of sites.

Sincerely,

Sean Holtz, Webmaster of Baseball Almanac & Baseball Fever
www.baseball-almanac.com | www.baseball-fever.com
"Baseball Almanac: Sharing Baseball. Sharing History."
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How did your team fare the day you were born?

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  • #91
    Originally posted by ElCaminoSS
    But the finished up the season 93-69-for the regular season were 54-27 (0.667 winning percentage) at home and 39-42 (0.481 winning percentage) away.
    Awsome...what team and what year would that be?
    "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
    Carl Yastrzemski

    Comment


    • #92
      oops, Thats kinda important isnt it. Its the Dodgers in 1991
      Born True Blue

      Comment


      • #93
        Originally posted by RuthMayBond
        That may be true, but the "other" Dodgers had a funny story on this date in 1995
        Please elaborate RMB.
        I note they defeated the Pirates 11-10 in bottom of 11th, the middle game of a 3 game sweep, at Dodgers Stadium in front of 44,032 spectators, but that was about all I could find out!.
        "A hot dog at the ballgame beats roast beef at the Ritz." ~Humphrey Bogart

        No matter how good you are, you're going to lose one-third of your games. No matter how bad you are you're going to win one-third of your games. It's the other third that makes the difference. ~Tommy Lasorda

        Comment


        • #94
          I really don't know what my team did on April 22, 1936, Troy. My eyes were closed, there was no radio in the room and TV hadn't been invented yet. I didn't develop into a BROOKLYN DODGERS fan for several days after the day I was born.

          Comment


          • #95
            Originally posted by Bklyn Boy since 1936
            I really don't know what my team did on April 22, 1936, Troy. My eyes were closed, there was no radio in the room and TV hadn't been invented yet. I didn't develop into a BROOKLYN DODGERS fan for several days after the day I was born.
            We'll find out for you..check back tomorrow.
            "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
            Carl Yastrzemski

            Comment


            • #96
              My dad and my older sister were at the Phillies game when my Mom went into labor. It was the Philly Phanatics birthday. April 26, 1987.
              Hey, Dad.... wanna have a catch?

              Comment


              • #97
                Originally posted by oscargamblesfro
                anybody have any recommendations of sites where i can find this info?
                http://www.retrosheet.org/

                Bob

                Comment


                • #98
                  Originally posted by Bklyn Boy since 1936
                  I really don't know what my team did on April 22, 1936, Troy. My eyes were closed, there was no radio in the room and TV hadn't been invented yet. I didn't develop into a BROOKLYN DODGERS fan for several days after the day I was born.
                  I beg to differ. Television was invented before your parents were born.

                  "History of Television Timeline





                  Main Page
                  • History of Television


                  By Mary Bellis
                  Television was not invented by a single inventor, instead many people working together and alone, contributed to the evolution of TV.

                  1831: Joseph Henry's and Michael Faraday's work with electromagnetism makes possible the era of electronic communication to begin.

                  1862: Abbe Giovanna Caselli invents his "pantelegraph" and becomes the first person to transmit a still image over wires.

                  1873: Scientists May and Smith experiment with selenium and light, this opens the door for inventors to transform images into electronic signals.

                  1876: Boston civil servant George Carey was thinking about complete television systems and in 1877 he put forward drawings for what he called a "selenium camera" that would allow people to "see by electricity." Eugen Goldstein coins the term "cathode rays" to describe the light emitted when an electric current was forced through a vacuum tube.

                  Late 1870's: Scientists and engineers like Paiva, Figuier, and Senlecq were suggesting alternative designs for "telectroscopes."

                  1880: Inventors like Bell and Edison theorize about telephone devices that transmit image as well as sound. Bell's photophone used light to transmit sound and he wanted to advance his device for image sending. George Carey builds a rudimentary system with light-sensitive cells.

                  1881: Sheldon Bidwell experiments with telephotography, another photophone.

                  1884: Paul Nipkow sends images over wires using a rotating metal disk technology calling it the "electric telescope" with 18 lines of resolution.

                  1900: At the World's Fair in Paris, the 1st International Congress of Electricity was held, where Russian, Constantin Perskyi made the first known use of the word "television."

                  Soon after, the momentum shifted from ideas and discussions to physical development of TV systems. Two paths were followed:

                  Mechanical television - based on Nipkow's rotating disks, and

                  Electronic television - based on the cathode ray tube work done independently in 1907 by English inventor A.A. Campbell-Swinton and Russian scientist Boris Rosing.

                  1906: Lee de Forest invents the "Audion" vacuum tube that proved essential to electronics. The Audion was the first tube with the ablity to amplify signals. Boris Rosing combines Nipkow's disk and a cathode ray tube and builds the first working mechanical TV system.

                  1907: Campbell Swinton and Boris Rosing suggest using cathode ray tubes to transmit images - independent of each other, they both develop electronic scanning methods of reproducing images.

                  American Charles Jenkins and Scotsman John Baird followed the mechanical model while Philo Farnsworth, working independently in San Francisco, and Russian émigré Vladimir Zworkin, working for Westinghouse and later RCA, advanced the electronic model.

                  1923: Vladimir Zworykin patents his iconscope a TV camera tube based on Campbell Swinton's ideas. The iconscope, which he called an "electric eye" becomes the cornerstone for further television development. He later develops the kinescope for picture display.

                  1924 - 1925: American Charles Jenkins and John Baird from Scotland, each demonstrate the mechanical transmissions of images over wire circuits. Photo Left: Jenkin's Radiovisor Model 100 circa 1931, sold as a kit. Baird becomes the first person to transmit moving silhouette images using a mechanical system based on Nipkow's disk. Vladimir Zworykin patents a color television system.

                  1926: John Baird operates a 30 lines of resolution system at 5 frames per second.

                  1927: Bell Telephone and the U.S. Department of Commerce conduct the first long distance use of TV, between Washington D.C. and New York City on April 9th. Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover commented, “Today we have, in a sense, the transmission of sight for the first time in the world’s history. Human genius has now destroyed the impediment of distance in a new respect, and in a manner hitherto unknown.” Philo Farnsworth files for a patent on the first complete electronic television system, which he called the Image Dissector.

                  1928: The Federal Radio Commission issues the first television license (W3XK) to Charles Jenkins.

                  1929: Vladimir Zworykin demonstrates the first practical electronic system for both the transmission and reception of images using his new kinescope tube. John Baird opens the first TV studio, however, the image quality was poor.

                  1930: Charles Jenkins broadcasts the first TV commercial. The BBC begins regular TV transmissions.

                  1933: Iowa State University (W9XK) starts broadcasting twice weekly television programs in cooperation with radio station WSUI.

                  1936: About 200 hundred television sets are in use world-wide. The introduction of coaxial cable, which is a pure copper or copper-coated wire surrounded by insulation and an aluminum covering. These cables were and are used to transmit television, telephone and data signals. The 1st "experimental" coaxial cable lines were laid by AT&T between New York and Philadelphia in 1936. The first “regular” installation connected Minneapolis and Stevens Point, WI in 1941. The original L1 coaxial-cable system could carry 480 telephone conversations or one television program. By the 1970's, L5 systems could carry 132,000 calls or more than 200 television programs."

                  So, you see, TV was around for a LONG time before you came into the world.

                  Bob

                  Comment


                  • #99
                    April 22, 1936 Boston Bees @ Brooklyn Dodgers

                    Originally posted by Bklyn Boy since 1936
                    I really don't know what my team did on April 22, 1936, Troy. My eyes were closed, there was no radio in the room and TV hadn't been invented yet. I didn't develop into a BROOKLYN DODGERS fan for several days after the day I was born.
                    The baseball Gods were watching over over you on that day.

                    The Dodgers shut out the Bees 5-0.

                    Van Mungo led the National League that year with 238 along with Dizzy Dean
                    coming in a distant second with 195, and the Dodgers finished seventh, 25 games behind the New York Giants.

                    And speaking of machetes Mungo had to be smuggled out of spring training in Cuba to "escape the machete-wielding husband of a nightclub dancer with whom he'd been caught in bed" (deadballera.com)

                    This is Mungo in his 1939 Play Ball card.
                    Attached Files
                    "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
                    Carl Yastrzemski

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by bluezebra
                      Television was invented before your parents were born.
                      I think for many Americans, owning a television set in 1936 was not even a consideration or a possibility, and my guess is he's not the only one who didn't think it was around back then.
                      "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
                      Carl Yastrzemski

                      Comment


                      • July 16, 1941 Reds @ Giants

                        Originally posted by driver62
                        What did the Reds do on July 16, 1941?
                        Giants won the game 7-4, but the Reds came back to win 10 of their next 13 against the Giants, Dodgers, Phillies and Braves.

                        Elmer Riddle led the league with a 2.24 ERA and Johnny Vander Meer took the strike out crown with 202. Vander Meer, of course, pitched back to back no hitters in 1938 one happening at the first night game at Ebbet's Field. in Brooklyn. He also pitched the longest 0-0 tie in baseball history. If anyone knows when and who this was against, can you please let us know?

                        The Reds finished the season at 88-66, good enough for third place, 12 games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers.

                        This is Vander Meer's 1949 Bowman card.
                        Attached Files
                        "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
                        Carl Yastrzemski

                        Comment


                        • Originally posted by Aa3rt
                          July 1st, 1953-the ORIGINAL Washington Senators, enroute to a 76-76 record and 5th place finish, defeat the Philadelphia Athletics in Philly by the score of 5-3.

                          If someone would like to post any additional information, I'd be most appreciative.
                          The box score for this game is not readily available, but here is some info about the 1953 Washington Senators.


                          Mickey Vernon led the American league in batting average at .337 and doubles with 43. A bit of an iron man himself, Vernon retired having played more games than anyone at first base with 2,237. Dwight Eisenhower had a penchant for Vernon; he was the president's favourite player.

                          Pitcher Bob Porterfield Finished with a league high 22 wins, one shy of Robin Roberts and Warren Spahn in the National League.
                          Attached Files
                          "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
                          Carl Yastrzemski

                          Comment


                          • July 15 - 18, 1982 Brewers take the Brooms to the White Sox

                            Originally posted by Chisox
                            Hey! Change the date to 41 years later and you have my b-day?
                            Of course, you realize that was the last day of Joe Ds hit streak? (at least ended in-tact)
                            And on that fateful day Chisox, your 2005 World Champion White Sox were in the midst of five game sweep at the hands of the Milwaukee Brewers.

                            Five games you say, Troy?

                            Yes it was five games. The previous day, the Sox had lost a doubleheader. The next day, while you were wondering who had turned on all the lights, Paul Molitor, Phil Gantner, Ted Simmons, Moose Haus and Rollie Fingers were busy giving it to Jerry Koosman and the White Sox. Robin Yount, who went hitless this day, was held to only five hits in the series.

                            La Marr Hoyt, seen here in his 1984 Topps card, helped the White Sox to a third place finish in the American League West, six games behind the California Angels with his league leading 19 wins.

                            Twenty three years later, the Baseball Gods smiled on you.
                            Attached Files
                            "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
                            Carl Yastrzemski

                            Comment


                            • Sept 20, 1959 Tigers 5 @ White Sox 4

                              Originally posted by leecemark
                              --Too lazy to check out how the game turned out that day (Sept 20, 1959), but it was the waning days of a disappointing season in a disappointing decade for the Tigers. They did have some individual heros, with Harvey Kuenn winning the batting title, Al Kaline leading the league in slugging and Eddie Yost in runs.
                              Here's Harvey Kuenn's 1959 Topps card
                              Attached Files
                              "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
                              Carl Yastrzemski

                              Comment


                              • Well, on my birthday of October 1, 1955 (yep, I'm that old, my dear Giants, then in New York, had completed the season (only 154 games then) a week earlier, and presumably they were finishing packing to go their off-season homes and jobs. (Yeah, players' paltry salaries required 'em to do that.) The bigger news everywhere on my birthday was that young actor James Dean had died in an auto accident the previous day.

                                The Giants had stumbled through a lumbering, middle of the pack season, burdened by old timers who didn't have it the way they did back in the 1951 hey day (like Sal Maglie and Al Dark), or newcomers who weren't quite there yet (Johnny Antonelli) or never would bes. This year was also Leo "The Lip" Durocher's last as the Giants' skipper. The still had two more desultory years left in New York, before they would move to the West Coast and pick up in short order such future HOFers as Cepeda, McCovey and Marichal.

                                But, they had Willie Mays, who led the team in every significant offensive category -- highlighted by his 51 home runs to go with his .319 batting average and 127 home runs. In a way, 1955 truly was his break-out year, showing the baseball world that he had that fifth "tool" -- power -- to go along with his fielding, throwing, baserunning, and hitting for average.
                                sigpicIt's not whether you fall -- everyone does -- but how you come out of the fall that counts.

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