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  • Just wanted to let everyone know, I got a name change. Hope everyone reconizes me.

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    • Originally posted by SDL
      How many pitchers did the Astros use against the Yankees?
      not one hit off 6 pitchers.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Williamsburg2599
        Just wanted to let everyone know, I got a name change. Hope everyone reconizes me.
        Eh, Williamsburg... reminds me of brooklyn...which reminds me of new york... which reminds of the MFY.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Murderer's Row
          January 5, 1920: The sale of Babe Ruth was announced to the public. The announcement had been delayed until the Yankees and Ruth agreed to terms ($40,000 total for two years).

          May 1, 1920: Babe Ruth hit his first home run as a Yankee, during a 6-0 victory over the Red Sox.

          July 1, 1920: Washington's Walter Johnson pitched a 1-0 no-hitter over the Red Sox. Johnson struck out ten, and missed a perfect game when 2B Bucky Harris booted an easy two-out grounder, resulting in an error and Boston's only base runner (Harry Hooper) of the day. The Red Sox hit only five balls out of the infield.

          July 7, 1920: Philadelphia's Dave Keefe shutout the Red Sox, 6-0, in the first game of a doubleheader. Scott Perry blanked them, 1-0, in the second game.

          September 17, 1920: Detroit OF Bobby Veach hit for the cycle against Boston. He had three singles, a double, a triple and a home run in six at-bats. The game lasted twelve innings, and the Tigers won the game 14-13.

          Harry Harper lost fourteen consecutive games for the Red Sox and finished the season 5-14.

          December 15, 1920: The Yankees sent Muddy Ruel, Del Pratt, Sammy Vick, and Hank Thormhalen to the Red Sox for Wally Schang, Mike McNally, Harry Harper and 21-year-old pitcher Waite Hoyt. Ruel and Pratt played catcher and second base, respectively, for the Sox for two or years. Ruel was traded by Boston in 1923 to the Washington Senators, where he won his only World Series in 1924. Wally Schang was New York's starting backstop for four years, batting .304 over that period. Hoyt (who had went 10-12 over his two year tenure with the Red Sox) played for the Yankees for 9-1/2 seasons. Over that span, he won 157 games and lost 98. He appeared in six World Series (winning three) with the Yanks, going 6-3 with a 1.62 ERA. Hoyt was elected into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1969.

          June 29-July 5, 1921: On June 29, the Red Sox lost both ends of a doubleheader against the Yankees (8-5 and 5-3). Their next game was not until July 2, when they lost another doubleheader versus New York (5-1 and 5-3). On July 4, Washington beat them in a pair of games, 4-1 and 7-3. The following day, the Senators took another doubleheader from the Sox, 7-5 and 4-1. Boston lost four consecutive doubleheaders (with no other games between) -- the American League record. It is a record that is unlikely to ever be broken due to the infrequency of modern-day doubleheaders.

          August 19, 1921: Ty Cobb hit his 3,000th hit off of Boston's Elmer Myers during a 10-0 Detroit Victory. He is the youngest player to ever reach 3000 hits, accomplishing it at age 34.

          January 10, 1922: The Red Sox dealt Roger Peckinpaugh to the Washington Senators as part of a three-team trade. They received Joe Dugan from the Athletics, and Frank O'Rourke from the Senators. Dugan played a half-season for Boston before being traded to New York, and O'Rourke played a total of 67 games for the '22 Sox. Peckinpaugh was voted the 1925 American League MVP while still playing for the Senators.

          May 20, 1922: Cleveland Indians OF Tris Speaker hit his first career grand slam, in the fifth inning off of Boston pitcher Bill Piercy. Cleveland won the game 5-2.

          July 23, 1922: In a six-player deal, Boston traded 3B Joe Dugan and OF Elmer Smith to New York for SS Johnny Mitchell, reliever Lefty O'Doul, OF Elmer Miller, utility man Chick Fewster and cash. Dugan, one of the better defensive thirdbasemen in the league, batted .286 over seven (including three championship) seasons with the Yanks. Fewster, Miller, and Mitchell combined for 717 AB, batting .237, over their Red Sox careers. O'Doul appeared in 23 games (1-1, 5.43 ERA) for Boston in 1923.

          July 29-August 1, 1922: St. Louis Browns OF Ken Williams hit home runs in each of four games against the Boston Red Sox.

          September 30, 1922: The New York Yankees clinched the pennant, beating the Red Sox (3-1) at Fenway.

          The Red Sox were worst in the league in runs scored, hits, batting average, slugging percentage, fielding percentage, errors, and on-base percentage.


          January 30, 1923: The Red Sox traded pitcher Herb Pennock to the Yankees for OF Camp Skinner, IF Norm McMillan, P George Murray and cash. Pennock went 162-90 for New York over eleven seasons; he was 5-0 in nine World Series appearances for the Yankees. Skinner appeared in seven games for the Red Sox before retiring from baseball. McMillan batted .253 for the '23 Sox before being traded to St. Louis. Murray went 9-20 over two seasons with Boston, posting a 5.48 ERA.

          April 18, 1923: Yankee Stadium opened, with the visiting Red Sox in town. In the bottom of the third, Bob Shawkey scored the first run in Yankee stadium on a Joe Dugan single off of Boston pitcher Howard Ehmke. With Whitey Witt on second, and Dugan on first, Babe Ruth came to the plate. Ruth hit the first home run in the new Stadium on a 2-2 curve delivered by Ehmke. The three-run dinger gave the Yankees a 4-0 lead. New York went on to win the game, 4-1, as Bob Shawkey pitched a three-hitter.

          July 7, 1923: In the first half of a doubleheader in Cleveland, the Indians beat the Red Sox 27-3. Cleveland scored in every inning of that game. Lefty O'Doul came into the game in the third inning. He gave up a run in the fourth, and two in the fifth inning. O'Doul loaded the bases before getting two outs in the sixth. Boston CF Mike Menosky missed a fly ball, which allowed two to score. Riggs Stephenson doubled in a run, and Rube Lutzke singled in a pair. O'Doul walked both Frank Brower and Steve O'Neill to load the bases. Cleveland pitcher Stan Coveleski (a .089 hitter) hit a two-run single. With the score 18-2, Charlie Jamieson walked to load the bases once again. Joe Connolly hit a two-run single, and O'Doul walked Ray Knode to load the bases for the fourth time in the inning. Sewell and Stephenson hit a pair of doubles. Stephenson was caught stealing third to end the inning. O'Doul faced sixteen batters, walked six, and allowed thirteen runs between getting the second out and the third out of the sixth. He allowed more runs in an inning than any other pitcher in the history of the game. The game is known as the "Indian Massacre." In the second game, Cleveland won 8-5.


          The Indian Massacre
          July 7, 1923 (gm 1) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
          Boston Red Sox 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 -- 3 13 4
          Cleveland Indians 3 2 3 1 2 13 1 2 x -- 27 24 2




          In the three games Cleveland played against Boston on July 7 and July 8, the Indians scored a total of fifty runs.

          August 1, 1923: Harry Frazee sold the Red Sox to a syndicate headed by St. Louis Browns business manager J.A. Robert Quinn. Quinn oversaw the Red Sox during their most unsuccessful era, 1923-32.

          September 27, 1923: During an 8-3 Yankee victory, New York rookie Lou Gehrig hit his first career homer off of Red Sox pitcher Bill Piercy.

          September 28, 1923: Facing the Red Sox, Lou Gehrig had three doubles, Babe Ruth had two doubles and a homer, and the Yankees had a total of thirty hits in 55 at-bats (both are AL records). New York won 24-4. Howard Ehmke gave up 17 runs on 21 hits in six innings.

          For the second year in a row, the Red Sox led the league in errors. Howard Ehmke hit twenty batters; Bill Piercy had an eleven game losing streak. Boston scored 584 runs (the least in the league) and allowed 809 (the most in the league). They went 0-11 in St. Louis. It was the second year in a row that the Sox had the worst offense in the AL. New York, with eleven former Red Sox players on their roster, won their first Championship.


          1923 Championship New York Yankees
          Player Position Acquired from Sox Hall of Fame
          Wally Schang C December 15, 1920
          Wally Pipp 1B --
          Aaron Ward 2B --
          Joe Dugan 3B July 23, 1922
          Everett Scott SS December 20, 1921
          Babe Ruth OF January 3, 1920 1936
          Bob Meusel OF --
          Whitey Witt OF --
          Herb Pennock SP January 30, 1923 1948
          Joe Bush SP December 20, 1921
          Sam Jones SP December 20, 1921
          Waite Hoyt SP December 15, 1920 1969
          Bob Shawkey SP --
          Carl Mays P July 29, 1919
          George Pipgras P January 23, 1923
          Oscar Roettger RP --
          Elmer Smith rsv OF July 23, 1922
          Mike McNally rsv IF December 15, 1920
          Benny Bengough rsv C --
          Ernie Johnson rsv IF --
          Mike Gazella rsv IF --
          Lou Gehrig rsv 1B -- 1939
          Harvey Hendrick rsv OF --
          Hinkey Haines rsv OF --

          July 16, 1924: After Boston dropped the first game of a doubleheader, Red Sox pitcher Bill Piercy gave up eight runs in the first inning of the second game against the Tigers, who went on to win 11-3. He was fined $100 by the club for "indifferent pitching." The two games were the first of a Tigers' five-game sweep at Fenway. The final game of Detroit's visit (on July 19) was Boston's tenth consecutive loss to the Tigers.

          September 29, 1924: A 4-2 victory at Fenway clinched the American League pennant for the Washington Senators.

          October 10, 1924: The Washington Senators beat the New York Giants in game seven of the World Series. Catcher Muddy Ruel and pitcher Allan Russell were both on the championship team. On February 23, 1923, they were both traded by the Sox to the Senators.

          Boston's Alex Ferguson and Howard Ehmke both had seventeen losses, tying Cleveland's Joe Shaute for the most in the American League.


          With Wally Pipp firmly engrained at first base, the New York Yankees offered 21-year-old Lou Gehrig to the Boston Red Sox in exchange for Phil Todt. Boston refused. Todt played six more years for the Red Sox, batting .258, and hitting 56 home runs. Gehrig is one of the greatest players to ever take the field.

          May 17, 1925: During an 11-6 loss to St. Louis, Red Sox pitcher Chet Ross committed four errors.

          June 18-July 30, 1925: Over this six week time frame, the Red Sox were outscored by 129 runs, winning six games and losing 34. In the month of July, the Sox allowed 221 runs to be scored (an average of over seven per game).

          August 15, 1925: The Red Sox lost, 3-1, to the Philadelphia Athletics. They had not won versus Philly since June 3, losing ten consecutive games.

          September 8, 1925: In the first game of a doubleheader, the Yankees beat Boston 5-4. In the second game, Red Sox lefty Buster Ross gave up Babe Ruth's 300th career home run as New York won, 7-4.

          The Red Sox started out the season going 2-10; they were 19-58 on the road. Boston was last in the league in runs scored and first in runs allowed. They committed 265 errors and had a fielding percentage of .956 (the worst in the majors). The Red Sox pitching trio of Howard Ehmke, Ted Wingfield, and Red Ruffing combined for a total of 57 losses. In games in which Boston scored at least four runs, the 1925 Red Sox had a losing record (35-43).


          April 27, 1926: Walter Johnson notched the 400th win of his career, as the Washington Senators beat the Red Sox, 9-1.

          May 8, 1926: A three-alarm fire burned Fenway's grandstand roof and leftfield bleachers, as well as an open dump that ran along Jersey Street (which was later renamed Yawkey Way). It was the fourth fire in the same place in two days -- and was ruled accidental. The cash-strapped Red Sox had to use most of the insurance proceeds to fund operations, leaving a vacant lot where the bleachers once stood.

          June 26, 1926: The Red Sox and Philadelphia A's traded pitchers, with Boston receiving both Slimm Harriss and Fred Heimach in exchange for Howard Ehmke. Over the remainder of the season, Heimach and Harriss went 8-19 for Boston, while Ehmke led the A's in victories going 12-4.

          August 21, 1926: The White Sox' Ted Lyons pitched a no-hitter versus the Red Sox, winning 6-0. Only two Red Sox batters reached base, Jack Tobin on a walk in the first and William "Baby Doll" Johnson on an error in the seventh. The game lasted 67 minutes.

          August 28, 1926: Cleveland's Emil "Dutch" Levsen pitched both games of a doubleheader against Boston, winning 6-1 and 5-1. Both were four-hitters.

          August 31-September 6, 1926: The Washington Senators had a five-game sweep at Fenway. The teams then traveled to Washington for a two game series, where the Senators earned their sixth and seventh consecutive victories over the Red Sox.

          September 7, 1926: The Red Sox lost 4-2 to the Yankees. It was their seventeenth loss in a row.


          Red Sox 17 Game Losing Streak
          August 20 - September 7, 1926
          August 20, 1926 Chicago White Sox 5 Boston Red Sox 1
          August 21, 1926 Chicago White Sox 6 Boston Red Sox 0
          August 23, 1926 Detroit Tigers 9 Boston Red Sox 1
          August 25, 1926 Detroit Tigers 11 Boston Red Sox 4
          August 25, 1926 Detroit Tigers 7 Boston Red Sox 6
          August 27, 1926 Cleveland Indians 9 Boston Red Sox 3
          August 27, 1926 Cleveland Indians 5 Boston Red Sox 4
          August 28, 1926 Cleveland Indians 6 Boston Red Sox 1
          August 28, 1926 Cleveland Indians 5 Boston Red Sox 1
          August 31, 1926 Washington Senators 2 Boston Red Sox 0
          September 1, 1926 Washington Senators 14 Boston Red Sox 12
          September 3, 1926 Washington Senators 3 Boston Red Sox 2
          September 3, 1926 Washington Senators 5 Boston Red Sox 1
          September 4, 1926 Washington Senators 5 Boston Red Sox 1
          September 5, 1926 Washington Senators 6 Boston Red Sox 2
          September 6, 1926 Washington Senators 2 Boston Red Sox 1
          September 7, 1926 New York Yankees 4 Boston Red Sox 2


          Between August 20 and September 19, 1926, the Red Sox won a total of three games (while losing 24).

          September 26, 1926: Detroit's Bob Fothergill hit for the cycle, and had a stolen base, against the Red Sox. The Tigers won 11-2, and followed with another victory (5-4) in the second game of a doubleheader.

          For the second consecutive season, Boston did not have a winning record against any other team in the league. With a pitching record of 6-18, Boston's Paul Zahniser led the league in losses (tied with Milt Gaston of the St. Louis Browns). The Red Sox would later trade for Gaston, who would pitch for Boston from 1929 to 1931. His record during that period was 27-52. Lee Fohl resigned as Red Sox manager after back-to-back last place finishes in the American League. Bill Carrigan was brought back to manage the '27 Sox.



          The Red Sox moved reliever Del Lundgren (26 earned runs in 31 innings pitched in 1926) from the bullpen into the rotation. He went 5-12 with a 6.27 ERA.

          April 22, 1927: The Washington Senators beat the Red Sox, 7-3, at Fenway. It represented Washington's fifteenth consecutive victory over Boston, dating back to June 30, 1926. Between April 26, 1926 and April 22, 1927, the Senators went 23-2 against the Red Sox.

          June 21, 1927: A pair of losses to the Yankees in Fenway (7-3 and 7-1) started a fifteen game Red Sox losing streak. During the streak, the Yankees had a five-game sweep at Fenway, and a four-game sweep over Boston in New York.

          June 23, 1927: The Yankees' Lou Gehrig hit three home runs, leading New York to a 11-4 victory over Boston.

          Boston finished June with a 4-24 record for the month. Between June 2 and July 4, 1927, the Red Sox won three games, and lost 27.

          August 17, 1927: A 6-2 loss to Detroit mathematically eliminated the Red Sox from playoff contention (with over six weeks remaining in the season).

          September 6, 1927: In the sixth inning of a 14-2 Yankees victory, Babe Ruth homered to center off of Red Sox pitcher Tony Welzer. That hit is considered one of the longest ever at Fenway.

          September 7, 1927: Babe Ruth hit two homers during a 12-10 victory over the Red Sox, giving him a total of five home runs in three consecutive games against Boston.

          For the third year in a row, the Red Sox lost more than 100 games. During the 1927 season, Boston had three losing streaks of ten or more games. They were last in the AL in runs, hits, batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage. The Red Sox went 0-11 in St. Louis. The Washington Senators overall record against the Red Sox in 1927 was 18-4 (including ten victories at Fenway).




          May 6, 1928: The Red Sox were shut out in their first game of the season against the Tigers, 3-0. They had also lost their previous nine games versus Detroit.

          Boston went 1-9 against the Athletics at Fenway (3-18 overall). The Red Sox did not have a winning month during the season. Charley "Red" Ruffing lost 25 games.

          November 22, 1928: Boston purchased pitcher Bill Bayne from the Cleveland Indians. Bayne had a 6.72 ERA in 1929, and retired from baseball after pitching in one game in 1930.

          December 15, 1928: The Red Sox traded Buddy Myer to the Washington Senators. Myer went on to become an All-Star (in the top-ten of many hitting categories during the mid-30s). In return, Boston received five players. Pitchers Hod Lisenbee and Milt Gaston combined for 42 wins and 85 losses for the Sox over the next four years. Grant Gillis and Elliott Bigelow each had one-year careers. Third baseman Bobby Reeves played for Boston from 1929-1931, hitting .229 with a total of 4 HR.


          April 28, 1929: Sunday baseball was approved in Boston. In a game played at Commonwealth Park (due to Fenway's proximity to a church), the Red Sox lost to Philadelphia 7-3 in their first Sunday home game.

          May 1, 1929: Philadelphia had 29 hits as they beat the Red Sox 24-6.

          May 22, 1929: Philadelphia scored twelve runs in the fifth inning against the Red Sox. The Athletics won the game 16-2.

          May 29-August 29, 1929: Boston met Philadelphia ten times over a three-month period. The Red Sox lost all ten games.

          September 2, 1929: Joe Cronin (playing for Washington), hit for the cycle against the Sox. He had two doubles, a single, a triple, and a home run during the Senators 10-7 victory.

          October 14, 1929: The Philadelphia Athletics beat the Chicago Cubs in game five of the World Series, to earn the championship. The 1929 Athletics featured two former Red Sox pitchers; Howard Ehmke (who won game one) and Jack Quinn.

          Boston did not have a winning record against any team in the American League; they went 4-18 versus the Athletics. Red Ruffing lost twelve consecutive games, and finished the season with a 9-22 record. He led the league in both runs and earned runs allowed for the second consecutive year.

          I think I'll post the '30s tomorrow
          I like this post
          2009 World Series Champions, The New York Yankees

          Comment


          • I died a little on the inside to see someone quote one of the longest posts I've ever seen, just to say "I like this post". Couldn't you just say "I liked the really long post" or something?
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDxgNjMTPIs

            Comment


            • Gee, I wonder where Murderer's Row got his lengthy post info from? Hmmmmmmmm?

              http://www.soxsuck.com/loss1920.html

              Anyway, originality and a sense of humor helps around here. Of course, I'll have to figure out what my excuse is.
              Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
              Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
              THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
              Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

              Comment


              • Originally posted by EvanAparra
                I know one even more recent.... anyone remember a 22-0 loss to the indians? A no hitter against the Astros? Or maybe not one but TWO 17-1 losses???
                Originally posted by SDL
                How many pitchers did the Astros use against the Yankees?

                Or how about a 5 game sweep of the Sawx at Fenway, outscoring Beantown 35-15? Just to mention a RECENT one.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Mattingly
                  Gee, I wonder where Murderer's Row got his lengthy post info from? Hmmmmmmmm?

                  http://www.soxsuck.com/loss1920.html

                  Anyway, originality and a sense of humor helps around here. Of course, I'll have to figure out what my excuse is.
                  Quite right Mattingly. Whenever I'm depressed, This will wrench me away from the depths of sorrow and back to the land of the living.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Yankeebiscuitfan
                    Or how about a 5 game sweep of the Sawx at Fenway, outscoring Beantown 35-15? Just to mention a RECENT one.
                    Actually even more recent would be 3-1 series victory for the Sox IN yankee stadium..

                    Or even more recent would be losing 3 straight games in the playoffs.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Mattingly
                      Anyway, originality and a sense of humor helps around here. Of course, I'll have to figure out what my excuse is.
                      This is going to take a while...

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by EvanAparra
                        Eh, Williamsburg... reminds me of brooklyn...which reminds me of new york... which reminds of the MFY.
                        MFY? Anyways, I was talking about THIS Williamsburg:
                        (Ignore the red box, those aren't my seats )
                        If RMB is out in left field, I guess I'm out in right. Where Gary Shefield is not allowed.

                        Comment


                        • MFY - mother f'ing yankees

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by EvanAparra
                            MFY - mother f'ing yankees
                            Not too close. We have youngsters on here. OK?
                            Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
                            Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
                            THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
                            Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by EvanAparra
                              This is going to take a while...
                              That's OK. Could be worse. I could be crying in my chowda about now for getting stomped by KC and being stuck in 3rd place. Heck, if Baltimore runs roughshod over you people in 2007, then 2090 may be more than a wish. It may even be a dream that never gets there, and could even be a nightmare from which you Beantowners will never awake.
                              Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
                              Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
                              THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
                              Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by KenFougere
                                No rules here, anything goes . . .
                                If a running log of dates floats someone's boat, that's fine by me. That doesn't mean, though, that anything goes here, Ken.
                                "Anything less would not have been worthy of me. Anything more would not have been possible." - Carl Yastrzemski

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