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  • Dead ball era-type baseballs

    Are there any companies that still manufacture baseballs like they used in the dead ball era? (Not sure if this thread should be here or in the history forum.)
    The Writer's Journey

  • #2
    Found only one. Lemon peel ball on MLB Shop.
    http://shop.mlb.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2908249

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    • #3
      http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php...ng_id=10536106
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      • #4
        Of course, they were playing "dead ball" fifty years after the lemonpeel ball of the 1860s had been left behind.

        Regardless of whether you're looking for old-style lemonpeels (or really old-style dark-leather lemonpeels), or late-deadball figure-eight stitch balls, you might want to look at 19 c Base Ball or Vintage Base Ball Factory.

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        • #5
          Thanks for your help guys. It's more of a curiosity than anything, but I might have to order one just to see what they are like.
          The Writer's Journey

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          • #6
            I actually have one which I cherish. It belonged to my great grandfather (1882-1959), and he used to pitch it to me when I was a kid. It looks like you would expect -- the wool thread is visible and the hide is really worn. And, boy, is it DEAD!
            Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

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            • #7
              Speaking of old baseballs, two that were granted patents but never made it.

              On top a ball with a small bell enclosed in the hollow center of the ball...........so you could hear it coming.

              Next an "off center" ball to aid the pitcher in throwing a curve.
              Attached Files

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              • #8
                Amazing, ShoelessJoe. Pitchers and hitters have always tried to get an edge, but those ball plans obviously pushed the envelope. The diagrams are really interesting... Thanks for posting this.
                Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by keystone View Post
                  Amazing, ShoelessJoe. Pitchers and hitters have always tried to get an edge, but those ball plans obviously pushed the envelope. The diagrams are really interesting... Thanks for posting this.
                  Two more from the 1800s that were granted US patents.

                  One to give an edge to the batter.... supposed edge. A bat round for most of the length but oval at the barrel, increased hitting surface.
                  For one year in the 1880s completely flat bats were legal.

                  The second a base with a bell at the bottom, an aid to the umps making calls.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by keystone View Post
                    Amazing, ShoelessJoe. Pitchers and hitters have always tried to get an edge, but those ball plans obviously pushed the envelope. The diagrams are really interesting... Thanks for posting this.
                    Yes hitters and pitchers trying to something to go their way.
                    Here is something, a change in recent years that is legal, hard to say how much it helps the hitter but most in the game use the cupped bat. Makes sense in theory. Cupping makes the bat lighter on the end, quicker swing but of course you lose some weight, mass.

                    When you look at it it's actually along the same principle of a corked bat, your making the bat lighter at the end but not losing any diameter on the barrel. Of course there is a limit to the cup. No more than one inch in depth and no more then two inches in diameter.
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by SHOELESSJOE3; 05-30-2008, 07:00 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by keystone View Post
                      I actually have one which I cherish. It belonged to my great grandfather (1882-1959), and he used to pitch it to me when I was a kid. It looks like you would expect -- the wool thread is visible and the hide is really worn. And, boy, is it DEAD!
                      I love stuff like that. How about a picture of the ball?

                      Scott
                      I told you not to be stupid you moron.

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                      • #12
                        Scott - I would love to oblige you, but I am a computer idiot. I don't even have a digital camera! I could take a photo with my point-and-shoot, scan it, email it to you, and then you could post it?

                        I need to pay a geek to come teach me about my computer deficiencies!

                        ShoelessJoe -- Aren't the bat handles a lot thinner than say, even 15 years ago? The cupping plus those thin handles makes the bat even lighter -- and more breakable.
                        Last edited by keystone; 05-30-2008, 11:44 PM.
                        Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by keystone View Post
                          Scott - I would love to oblige you, but I am a computer idiot. I don't even have a digital camera! I could take a photo with my point-and-shoot, scan it, email it to you, and then you could post it?

                          I need to pay a geek to come teach me about my computer deficiencies!

                          ShoelessJoe -- Aren't the bat handles a lot thinner than say, even 15 years ago? The cupping plus those thin handles makes the bat even lighter -- and more breakable.
                          Thinner handles are in, recent years. One of the reasons we are seeing more broken bats in recent years. It is going to happen, it already has in some games injuies that is, but someone may get killed yet. The Maple bats now in use tend to snap sending some heavy wood outward.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                            Yes hitters and pitchers trying to something to go their way.
                            Here is something, a change in recent years that is legal, hard to say how much it helps the hitter but most in the game use the cupped bat. Makes sense in theory. Cupping makes the bat lighter on the end, quicker swing but of course you lose some weight, mass.

                            When you look at it it's actually along the same principle of a corked bat, your making the bat lighter at the end but not losing any diameter on the barrel. Of course there is a limit to the cup. No more than one inch in depth and no more then two inches in diameter.

                            Speaking of bats, Heinie Groh and his "bottle bat."
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              That bat was actually allowed?
                              Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

                              Comment

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