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  • Surprising Stats

    You guys ever run across stats when looking at a player that really stand out to you?

    For example:
    -Ken Griffey Sr. and Amos Otis had a higher lifetime OPS+ than Bobby Thomson (118 and 114 to 110)
    -Despite leading the league in steals for his first six seasons, Vince Coleman's OPS+ was only over 100 in the last one.
    -Minnie Minoso, despite not being hot on the Hall of Fame vote, had a higher OPS+ than Jim Rice, Andre Dawson, Bobby Bonds, and Johnny Bench, all known power hitters and in or close to the Hall of Fame. (Granted, he played in fewer seasons than Dawson but it's still pretty impressive)
    Last edited by 1905 Giants; 04-03-2012, 11:53 AM.
    “There can be no higher law in journalism than to tell the truth and to shame the devil.” Walter Lippmann

    "Fill in any figure you want for that boy (Mantle). Whatever the figure, it's a deal." - Branch Rickey

  • #2
    Randy Velarde had more 200-hit seasons than all of the following players, combined.

    Mark Grace
    Edgar Martinez
    Chipper Jones
    Mel Ott
    Will Clark
    Ted Williams
    Lou Boudreau
    Roberto Alomar
    Enos Slaughter
    Manny Ramirez
    Barry Bonds
    Mickey Mantle
    Orlando Cepeda
    Frank Thomas
    Ken Griffey Jr.
    Duke Snider
    Carl Yastrzemski

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    • #3
      Reggie Jackson never had back to back 30HR seasons.
      The only player to ground into 3 DPs in a WS game was Willie Mays.
      In 1946, Johnny Sain didn't strike out once or draw a single walk. He put the ball in play ever single time up (104 PA).
      Sain also struck out only 20 times in 856 career PA.
      In Randy Johnson's 20K game in 2001, the 1B-man got 4 of the 20 putouts.
      Terry Forster - a Relief Pitcher, had a .397 career batting avg.

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      • #4
        not a player stat, but from 1979 all the way to 1994.....no team in baseball had more wins than the Expos.

        (not really surprising to certain fans who knew that Montreal was known to put quality teams on the field quite often, but I'd think the Expos would not be the first team you think of with a stat like that)
        "all the mets road wins against the dodgers this year have occured at Dodger Stadium"---Ralph Kiner

        "Blind people came to the park just to listen to him pitch"---Reggie Jackson, talking about Tom Seaver

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        • #5
          in 2000, Todd Helton hit .372/.463/.698 with 42 HR, 147 RBI, 216 H, 59 2B, and finished 5th in MVP voting. 5th!? That surprised me even more than the stats did.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RDB_SoxFan View Post
            in 2000, Todd Helton hit .372/.463/.698 with 42 HR, 147 RBI, 216 H, 59 2B, and finished 5th in MVP voting. 5th!? That surprised me even more than the stats did.
            He had a great year, but he benefited largely from his home ballpark. Even though his road stats were solid, his OPS was about .170 points lower than his home stats, and he had 12 less home runs. His OPS+ which is adjusted for ballparks was 163, which was 3rd in his league. He could have won the MVP that year, but the writers didn't feel right giving it to someone with such an advantage.
            Rest in Peace Jose Fernandez (1992-2016)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Francoeurstein View Post
              He had a great year, but he benefited largely from his home ballpark. Even though his road stats were solid, his OPS was about .170 points lower than his home stats, and he had 12 less home runs. His OPS+ which is adjusted for ballparks was 163, which was 3rd in his league. He could have won the MVP that year, but the writers didn't feel right giving it to someone with such an advantage.
              I see. Yeah i suppose i forgot to account for his home park, Coors Field. Still though, very impressive numbers, no matter what your home park is.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ipitch View Post
                Randy Velarde had more 200-hit seasons than all of the following players, combined.

                Mark Grace
                Edgar Martinez
                Chipper Jones
                Mel Ott
                Will Clark
                Ted Williams
                Lou Boudreau
                Roberto Alomar
                Enos Slaughter
                Manny Ramirez
                Barry Bonds
                Mickey Mantle
                Orlando Cepeda
                Frank Thomas
                Ken Griffey Jr.
                Duke Snider
                Carl Yastrzemski
                That is surprising! I would have sworn that Yaz had 200 hits in a season at least once. I thought Manny did too, but he never even came particularly close.
                They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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                • #9
                  Here's one: Allie Reynolds was 21 and 53 in games with 0-2 runs scored
                  “There can be no higher law in journalism than to tell the truth and to shame the devil.” Walter Lippmann

                  "Fill in any figure you want for that boy (Mantle). Whatever the figure, it's a deal." - Branch Rickey

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Rod Carew 1977 14 HR 100 RBI's
                    and
                    Hank Aaron never had more than 47 HR's in a season
                    My blog - http://sandlotwisdom.blogspot.com/

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Francoeurstein View Post
                      He had a great year, but he benefited largely from his home ballpark. Even though his road stats were solid, his OPS was about .170 points lower than his home stats, and he had 12 less home runs. His OPS+ which is adjusted for ballparks was 163, which was 3rd in his league. He could have won the MVP that year, but the writers didn't feel right giving it to someone with such an advantage.
                      As late as August 28, 2000 Helton was hitting .397 (186 for 469), two hits short of .400.
                      Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                      • #12
                        Tom Glavine in 1988 went 7-17. This was his first full season. That, IMO, proves that great players will prove themselves over time and that it is not all about big-splash rookie years. Sometimes the greats have a learning curve.
                        Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                        A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                        Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 1905 Giants View Post
                          Here's one: Allie Reynolds was 21 and 53 in games with 0-2 runs scored
                          Not sure why that is so surprising
                          Mythical SF Chronicle scouting report: "That Jeff runs like a deer. Unfortunately, he also hits AND throws like one." I am Venus DeMilo - NO ARM! I can play like a big leaguer, I can field like Luzinski, run like Lombardi. The secret to managing is keeping the ones who hate you away from the undecided ones. I am a triumph of quantity over quality. I'm almost useful, every village needs an idiot.
                          Good traders: MadHatter(2), BoofBonser26, StormSurge

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                          • #14
                            In 1930, Chuck Klein hit .386 with 40 homers, 170 RBI, 250 hits, and a .687 slugging percentage. He led the league in zero of those categories. That is the only year in baseball history for which that would hold true.
                            "Here's a crazy thought I've always had: if they cut three fingers off each hand, I'd really be a great hitter because then I could level off better." Paul Waner (lifetime .333 hitter, 3,152 lifetime hits.

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                            • #15
                              Lou Gehrig never hit 50 homers...had years of 49, 49, 47, and 46.

                              Keith Moreland went 12 for 15 stealing bases for the Cubs in 1985...Ron Cey was a speed demon compared to this guy. Must have been some catchers in the NL with broken arms that year.

                              Whitey Ford only won 20 or more games twice, both times for Ralph Houk. Stengel only started him over 30 times once and had Ford pitching relief a handful of games a year...Casey had funny ideas about how to run a team, but I guess he made it work somehow.
                              "If I drink whiskey, I'll never get worms!" - Hack Wilson

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