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  • Players reaching out to fans to raise money for charities

    Countless times you will see players reaching out to the fans to raise money for charities. But when these players don't make it public that they're donating their own money to the same charity they want your money from, it makes them seem greedy - especially since most of them make well over 100 times what the typical fan makes.

    Imagine if someone came to you to ask money for a charity. And you find out this person lives a life of luxury - exotic cars, exotic vacations, etc. - yet doesn't donate any of his own money to the charity. How would you feel about helping out someone who has far more capability of giving to the charity than you do?

    The players need only look to their colleagues to raise money for their charities. Their teammates make far more money than the typical fan does and have far more discretionary money than the typical fan.
    Holding a pitcher accountable for how many runs his team scores is like holding the designated hitter accountable for how many runs his team allows.

    An individual statistic is meaningful only if it is based strictly on what the player does and not on what the other players on his team do.

    Contrary to what most baseball fans claim, a pitched ball which is hit into play is not a strike.

  • #2
    I'm not sure I understand what the issue is. Nobody has to give anything. If you are a famous personality, what's wrong with lending your name to a good cause? Let's say Derek Jeter has 1,000,000 Twitter followers. If they each give an average of $1, he can raise $1,000,000 for a good cause simply by taking 5 seconds to type a few words. IF I had that kind of influence, I hope I'd use it for good things like this. Whether or not Jeter himself gives money to this particular charity should be irrelevant IMO.
    My top 10 players:

    1. Babe Ruth
    2. Barry Bonds
    3. Ty Cobb
    4. Ted Williams
    5. Willie Mays
    6. Alex Rodriguez
    7. Hank Aaron
    8. Honus Wagner
    9. Lou Gehrig
    10. Mickey Mantle

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    • #3
      This is not a current event. It's more of a (highly speculative,zero-fact based) blog post than anything else.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by BiZmaRK View Post
        Countless times you will see players reaching out to the fans to raise money for charities. But when these players don't make it public that they're donating their own money to the same charity they want your money from, it makes them seem greedy - especially since most of them make well over 100 times what the typical fan makes.

        Imagine if someone came to you to ask money for a charity. And you find out this person lives a life of luxury - exotic cars, exotic vacations, etc. - yet doesn't donate any of his own money to the charity. How would you feel about helping out someone who has far more capability of giving to the charity than you do?

        The players need only look to their colleagues to raise money for their charities. Their teammates make far more money than the typical fan does and have far more discretionary money than the typical fan.
        Well if the charity is legit you are not helping out the player. You are helping out the people the charity is for, right? Who cares if the player gives or not. If a player asks to help feed the homeless would it make much sense for you to say, "Since the player doesn't donate, I don't want to help a charity that feeds the homeless either."
        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
          Well if the charity is legit you are not helping out the player. You are helping out the people the charity is for, right? Who cares if the player gives or not. If a player asks to help feed the homeless would it make much sense for you to say, "Since the player doesn't donate, I don't want to help a charity that feeds the homeless either."
          You're missing the point. It's not whether or not you feel you should help the charity. It's a question of why the player reaches out to those who are far less capable to help out than those who are in his immediate professional circle.

          If you were in a profession in which many people were millionaires and wanted to raise money for a charity, would you go to a bunch of starving students or would you reach out to other millionaires? Which would more likely help you meet the demands of the charity?
          Holding a pitcher accountable for how many runs his team scores is like holding the designated hitter accountable for how many runs his team allows.

          An individual statistic is meaningful only if it is based strictly on what the player does and not on what the other players on his team do.

          Contrary to what most baseball fans claim, a pitched ball which is hit into play is not a strike.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BiZmaRK View Post

            If you were in a profession in which many people were millionaires and wanted to raise money for a charity, would you go to a bunch of starving students or would you reach out to other millionaires? Which would more likely help you meet the demands of the charity?
            The only way I could see myself appealing to the general public (if I were a millionaire) would be if I were famously associated with a specifice charity and they specifically asked me to appeal for donations. I think it's kind of tasteless for millionaires to appeal to the general public for donations.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BiZmaRK View Post
              You're missing the point. It's not whether or not you feel you should help the charity. It's a question of why the player reaches out to those who are far less capable to help out than those who are in his immediate professional circle.
              No, I get the point. It's another one of your threads complaining about greedy baseball players. I'm surprised you haven't mentioned Matt Cain yet.

              If you were in a profession in which many people were millionaires and wanted to raise money for a charity, would you go to a bunch of starving students or would you reach out to other millionaires? Which would more likely help you meet the demands of the charity?
              Starving students can still help in other ways without giving money. They can offer services and work to the charity.
              Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BiZmaRK View Post
                You're missing the point. It's not whether or not you feel you should help the charity. It's a question of why the player reaches out to those who are far less capable to help out than those who are in his immediate professional circle.

                If you were in a profession in which many people were millionaires and wanted to raise money for a charity, would you go to a bunch of starving students or would you reach out to other millionaires? Which would more likely help you meet the demands of the charity?
                Oh, for crying out loud.

                1. Unless it's a fundraiser where a specific goal is stated, I imagine most charities will take any money they can get. That means even small donations from average people like you and me contribute to their cause.

                2. How do you know the ballplayers don't donate to the charity themselves or reach out to their fellow ballplayers? If I were a millionaire trying to help out a charity, of course I'd give some of my own money. Are they supposed to publicize the exact amount they give, or the full extent to which they've worked with the charity? Why? Are they doing it because they believe in the cause or because they want to glorify themselves?

                3. Why should only millionaires donate to charity? Are the rest of us exempt from any sort of social responsibility? Your argument seems to be "Why ask us for money? Can't their money alone support this charity?" Why should the entire burden be placed on their shoulders? I've donated small amounts to causes I thought were worthwhile before, and I don't feel bitter about it because theoretically some rich person could've donated my share and more.
                Baseball Junk Drawer

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                • #9
                  Unless there are specific athletes who the OP wants to "out," this thread is pointless

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cap78 View Post
                    Unless there are specific athletes who the OP wants to "out," this thread is pointless
                    You think so?

                    Me, too.

                    Closing.
                    Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
                    Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
                    Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
                    Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
                    Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

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