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Is the perfect game the most impressive single game accomplishment in team sports?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by TonyK View Post
    In 1902, Nig Clarke hit 8* home runs in a Texas League game and his team scored 51 runs.
    *Allegedly.
    http://bb_catchers.tripod.com/catchers/clarkejj3.htm

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    • #17
      [QUOTE=ipitch;2052563]*Allegedly.
      http://bb_catchers.tripod.com/catchers/clarkejj3.htm[/QUOTE

      Another odd baseball myth. If William Ruggles took the time to get a signed affadavit from the official scorer, and it is listed as the official minor league record, then it's all right by me. Lefty Clarke hitting 8 out of his team's 21 home runs doesn't sound unlikely, but a walk was mentioned so maybe he wasn't perfect after all?
      "He's tougher than a railroad sandwich."
      "You'se Got The Eye Of An Eagle."

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Dude Paskert View Post
        Guess you could extend it to a perfect game with 27 three pitch strikeouts.
        I'm not surprised at all that there have been perfect games with all strikeouts in high school fastpitch, but those are also 7 inning games.
        Totally agree. All strikeouts is the perfect target to shoot for. And so far in MLB history, whose perfect game had the most KOs? (Answer below)


        (Koufax with 14 vs.Cubs in 1965)

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        • #19
          Originally posted by jnakamura View Post
          How about a 5 HR game?

          Possible, but never done even once in 143 years of MLB.
          This was my first reaction, too--a 5-homer game. We might just see it happen sometime--certainly before a 27-strikeout perfect game!!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Ben Grimm View Post
            Then that would make Brendan Frazer not only the greatest movie actor in the past 100 years, but also the single-greatest pitcher for one day as well!!!
            Not to be confused with Brendan Fraser, of course...

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            • #21
              Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
              Not only is that very, very difficult to do but also how many times does a batter come to the plate 5 times in one game. Sure it happens but not that often.
              .
              Usually if a team scores 5 or more runs you'll have players with 5 PAs

              I checked 3 random box scores from yesterday (with 5+ run totals) and counted 8 players with 5 and one with 6.
              I see great things in baseball. It's our game - the American game.
              - Walt Whitman

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              • #22
                I still remember Fernando Tatis' two grand slams in the same inning. I probably wouldn't have stuck so much had he not been on my roto team at the time.

                But to have that happen required so many things to fall into place that there's a chance it's never duplicated.
                "Chuckie doesn't take on 2-0. Chuckie's hackin'." - Chuck Carr two days prior to being released by the Milwaukee Brewers

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                • #23
                  Of all the "Perfect Games," it's the one that's NOT an official perfect game that I like best:

                  The Babe took the mound at Fenway Park for the first game of a Boston-Washington doubleheader on June 23, 1917. Umpire Brick Owens called the first three pitches to leadoff batter Ray Morgan all balls. After heated jawing, Ruth blew up on Owens’ ball four call and charged with fists flying. Shore loyally maintained decades later that Ruth hadn’t actually struck Owens, but the Bambino admitted in his autobiography, “I really socked him—right on the jaw...They’d put you in jail today for hitting an umpire.” Teammates had to drag the ejected hurler off the diamond.

                  Player-manager Jack Barry summoned Shore from the bench for an emergency start. “Try to get through this inning,” he said. Shore tossed his five allotted warm-up pitches and began. Morgan tried stealing on the first pitch but Boston catcher Sam Agnew gunned him down. Shore then retired two batters with five more pitches and returned to the dugout. The big right-hander said he felt fine, so Barry sent him to the bullpen to warm up properly while Boston batted.

                  Shore came back out and retired the next 23 consecutive batters. Then Mike Menosky stepped up to the plate, the last chance for the Senators. The speedy outfielder laid down a bunt ordered by manager Griffith. The bunt was “pretty good,” Shore recalled, but Barry rushed in from second for a bare-hand grab and flip to first for the out. Shore had retired each of the 26 batters he’d faced, plus the man left on base by Ruth.

                  Years later the former mathematician calculated that he hadn’t thrown 75 pitches the whole game, which he called the easiest he ever pitched. “I just threw it up there,” he said years later, “and they hit it to the outfield or the infield.” (He believed he had pitched better in September 1915 during a crucial 12-inning, 1-0, win at home over Harry Coveleski of the Tigers.)

                  “Modest Ernie Shore took a place in the Hall of Fame as a no-hit, no-run, no-man-reached-first base pitcher,” the Boston Globe later proclaimed of the Washington game. But whether it constituted a perfect game or simply a unique no-hitter would be debated for decades. The only clarity in 1917 came from William Harridge, secretary of the American League. He wired a sportswriter a month afterward: “Ernie Shore is credited with a no-hit game in the official scores of June 23.”

                  [ATTACH]113436[/ATTACH][ATTACH]113437[/ATTACH]
                  http://sabr.org/bioproj/person/6073c617
                  Well, excluding Don Larsen.
                  [FYI: YankeeMan's been SABR Member since 1994 - JOIN TODAY at www.sabr.org!]
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                  Last edited by YankeeMan; 08-20-2012, 12:53 PM.
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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                    Not only is that very, very difficult to do but also how many times does a batter come to the plate 5 times in one game. Sure it happens but not that often.
                    I read about Gehrig's 4 homer game and if I recall in one at bat, game recap described as a long fly ball.
                    Didn't Al Simmons steal a homerun from Gehrig in that game? I heard Gehrig refused to talk to Simmons when they vacationed on a cruise ship because of it.
                    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

                    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by chicagowhitesox1173 View Post
                      Didn't Al Simmons steal a homerun from Gehrig in that game? I heard Gehrig refused to talk to Simmons when they vacationed on a cruise ship because of it.
                      Simmons did not rob Lou of a home run, mabe an EBH, Lou did fly out very deep to Al in the 9th inning his last at bat.
                      Lou homered first 4 at bats, ground out in 5th at bat.

                      Game recap description..........In Lou's last at bat he flew out to Al Simmons only a few steps from the deepest corner in CF. Another game recap descibes Simmmons a robbing Lou of base hit. So it appears that Simmons had to make a running catch, near the 468 mark.

                      Shibe Park was 468 feet to centerfield. What I wonder, Simmons started the game in LF then replaced Doc Cramer in CF.
                      Possible, maybe Cramer does not catch up with the drive, I would bet Lou would have to go all out and try for an inside the park home run. It was into the deepest part of the park.

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                      • #26
                        A bowler netting 10 wickets in an innings in cricket, or a batsman scoring a double or triple century in cricket are arguably as good as or better than a perfect game. Every team sport has its magical moments/performances and it is impossible to compare sport to sport. A perfect game in baseball is as god as it gets for a pitcher, but what about 4HR from 4 at bats by a batter?
                        "A hot dog at the ballgame beats roast beef at the Ritz." ~Humphrey Bogart

                        No matter how good you are, you're going to lose one-third of your games. No matter how bad you are you're going to win one-third of your games. It's the other third that makes the difference. ~Tommy Lasorda

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post
                          Not only is that very, very difficult to do but also how many times does a batter come to the plate 5 times in one game. Sure it happens but not that often.
                          I read about Gehrig's 4 homer game and if I recall in one at bat, game recap described as a long fly ball.
                          I'm more impressed with Gehrig's three triples in a game called on account of rain in the fifth inning. At least, the story about it.
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                          Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
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                          Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Marc Wallace View Post
                            Totally agree. All strikeouts is the perfect target to shoot for. And so far in MLB history, whose perfect game had the most KOs? (Answer below)


                            (Koufax with 14 vs.Cubs in 1965)
                            I believe Matt Cain shares the record.
                            My top 10 players:

                            1. Babe Ruth
                            2. Barry Bonds
                            3. Ty Cobb
                            4. Ted Williams
                            5. Willie Mays
                            6. Alex Rodriguez
                            7. Hank Aaron
                            8. Honus Wagner
                            9. Lou Gehrig
                            10. Mickey Mantle

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                            • #29
                              More good stuff from SABR...

                              My big question is why so many Perfect Games recently? Here are some theories:

                              http://sabr.org/research/modeling-pe...tters-baseball

                              http://news.blogs.cnn.com/2012/08/16...perfect-games/
                              WORLD CHAMPIONS!

                              1923 • 1927 • 1928 • 1932 • 1936 • 1937 • 1938 • 1939 • 1941 • 1943

                              1947 • 1949 • 1950 • 1951 • 1952 • 1953 • 1956 • 1958 • 1961 • 1962


                              1977 • 1978 • 1996 • 1998 • 1999 • 2000 • 2009

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                They had this exact discussion on a Montreal sports radio station recently (they didn't limit it to 'team' sports though). A lot of the same points were made but another one that was brought up was shooting a 59 on the PGA Tour. Breaking 60 has only been done a handful of times in history. As others have brought up though, it's not as binary as a perfect game, you can always shoot 58 (theoretically, it's never been done on the PGA Tour as far as I know). There's something very 'clean' about a no-hitter or perfect game, it's not a degree of anything.

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