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My One-Man Team

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  • My One-Man Team

    If you could choose one player and clone him as many times as needed to play all the positions, from DH to closer, who would you choose?

    I think I'd pick Buck Ewing, who actually did it, pitching a creditable 47 innings with 3.45 ERA. His arm was very good, and he actually played a lot of third base and a handful of games at the other positions.
    Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

  • #2
    I would have to go with Babe Ruth.
    "(Shoeless Joe Jackson's fall from grace is one of the real tragedies of baseball. I always thought he was more sinned against than sinning." -- Connie Mack

    "I have the ultimate respect for Whitesox fans. They were as miserable as the Cubs and Redsox fans ever were but always had the good decency to keep it to themselves. And when they finally won the World Series, they celebrated without annoying every other fan in the country."--Jim Caple, ESPN (Jan. 12, 2011)

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    • #3
      Originally posted by chicagowhitesox1173 View Post
      I would have to go with Babe Ruth.
      We have a winner. That was a quick thread.
      They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ol' aches and pains View Post
        We have a winner. That was a quick thread.
        OK, if you want a left handed catcher and infielders. It's not really baseball, though.
        Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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        • #5
          Honus Wagner was extremely versatile and he had a rocket arm. He would be a decent choice.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Jackaroo Dave View Post
            OK, if you want a left handed catcher and infielders. It's not really baseball, though.
            Not to mention he's dead, if you want to get all literal about it.
            They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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            • #7
              Ewing, Ruth, and Wagner are all fine choices. It really boils down to the most versatile guys, the most qualified being pre-1920s before specialization. There's also Pete Rose, though he never caught and can't pitch. Harmon Killebrew played several spots, but would do poorly at speed positions. Bill Hall could do anything, wasn't a bad pitcher, but was a poor hitter.

              Monte Ward played all over, as did his contemporary Bob Caruthers. Their short stature may make them poor first basemen and catchers, though. Christy Mathewson was very athletic, often left in by McGraw to hit.

              My choice is either Buck Ewing or (surprisingly) Bob Gibson. Polishing his already decent hitting creates a stellar player already able to pitch and field. As a three-sport college varsity athlete with fielding skills on the mound, I'm sure learning the ropes of other positions wouldn't prove too difficult
              "Allen Sutton Sothoron pitched his initials off today."--1920s article

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Tyrus4189Cobb View Post
                Ewing, Ruth, and Wagner are all fine choices. It really boils down to the most versatile guys, the most qualified being pre-1920s before specialization. There's also Pete Rose, though he never caught and can't pitch. Harmon Killebrew played several spots, but would do poorly at speed positions. Bill Hall could do anything, wasn't a bad pitcher, but was a poor hitter.

                Monte Ward played all over, as did his contemporary Bob Caruthers. Their short stature may make them poor first basemen and catchers, though. Christy Mathewson was very athletic, often left in by McGraw to hit.

                My choice is either Buck Ewing or (surprisingly) Bob Gibson. Polishing his already decent hitting creates a stellar player already able to pitch and field. As a three-sport college varsity athlete with fielding skills on the mound, I'm sure learning the ropes of other positions wouldn't prove too difficult
                Actually, I thought of Gibson, too, for the reasons you mentioned. Ward and Carruthers are really good choices. I think Dave Foutz would be another on those lines. At 6'1" he'd be a good target at first, but I don't know about catching. Well, Connie Mack caught.
                Indeed the first step toward finding out is to acknowledge you do not satisfactorily know already; so that no blight can so surely arrest all intellectual growth as the blight of cocksureness.--CS Peirce

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                • #9
                  Martín Dihigo is also highly qualified.

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                  • #10
                    Anybody remember stories of that Toe Nash kid a decade or so ago? IIRC, he supposedly pitched in the 90s and launched balls out of the park from both sides. Not sure what became of him, but there was a lot of hype about him at the time.
                    "Chuckie doesn't take on 2-0. Chuckie's hackin'." - Chuck Carr two days prior to being released by the Milwaukee Brewers

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                    • #11
                      Jimmie Foxx

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                      • #12
                        Walter Johnson was a decent hitter and a strikeout artist. He would be a good choice.

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                        • #13
                          Babe Ruth has to be number one, considering his dominant hitting and pitching. I'd be willing to put up with poor defense in the infield.
                          My top 10 players:

                          1. Babe Ruth
                          2. Barry Bonds
                          3. Ty Cobb
                          4. Ted Williams
                          5. Willie Mays
                          6. Alex Rodriguez
                          7. Hank Aaron
                          8. Honus Wagner
                          9. Lou Gehrig
                          10. Mickey Mantle

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                          • #14
                            Bert Campaneris was very versatile defensively. However, Giambi has a very valid point. How would any team beat a team with a 130 ERA+ and a 200 OPS+? That's a scary thought. I'd take my chances with the terrible fielding up the middle.
                            Last edited by pheasant; 01-18-2013, 03:46 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Smoky Joe Wood

                              Josh Hamilton was a pitching prospect. But LH.
                              "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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