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Question: most disappointing player ever

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  • #76
    Originally posted by ThePeach
    How about Benny Kauff? He was suppossed to be the "Ty Cobb" of the Federal League, but when he entered the majors not much materialzed for him. I think he also had some other troubles out side of baseball that got hiim kicked out, but my memory isn't clear on the details now.
    Funny, just before reading this post, I read Bill James's commentary on him (he's ranked 94 on James's all-time center fielders list).

    John McGraw said,
    Benny Kauff is an excellent type of the man who comes into baseball without mental training and who could never grasp the idea of trying to find his faults instead of trying to hide them.
    In 1914, after signing with the New York Giants, National League President John Tener said he didn't approve the signing and that Kauff wouldn't be allowed to play. He didn't want to raid the Federal League Teams. So he played the next season in the Federal League again. The league then broke up and McGraw again signed Kauff. In 1918, he spent half the season fighting WWI, and in 1920, Kenesaw Landis kicked him out of baseball after he was allegedly involved in a fraud and automobile theft ring led by his brother. He was acquitted of the charges but Landis never let him back in.
    A lot of people say this honor validates my career, but I didn't work hard for validation. I didn't play the game right because I saw a reward at the end of the tunnel. I played it right because that's what you're supposed to do, play it right and with respect. If this validates anything, it's that learning how to bunt and hit and run and turning two is more important than knowing where to find the little red light at the dug out camera. - Ryne Sandberg

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    • #77
      Originally posted by ElCaminoSS
      I guess he had a decent career, but nothing compared to what he could have had, same with Gooden. Both were easy Hall of Famers if they werent all doped up.
      Gooden's main problem was not drugs but blatant overuse at an early age. He threw a tremendous amount of innings for a young pitcher.

      Age 19-218.0 IP
      Age 20-276.7 IP
      Age 21-250.0 IP
      Age 22-179.7 IP
      Age 23-248.3 IP
      age 24-118.3 IP
      Age 25-232.7 IP

      The Mets destroyed his arm.
      Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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      • #78
        Originally posted by Jake83
        How about fomer Cal League pitcher Steve Dalkowski. Legend was he could throw 120 mph but he drank like a horse and had numerous women involved in his life. A very interesting story. He was voted one of the greatest 100 baseball players ever without playing in a major league game
        Dalkowski was never destined to be a major league pitcher. He had a recorded IQ of about 60. In Bill James' Manager's book he talks about Dalkowski in the Earl Weaver section. Weaver gave him an IQ test and he immediately knew the problem. All the constant "coaching" by managers ans coaches just confused Dalkowski. So Weaver simplified his approach and told Dalkowski to just throw his fastball and curveball and nothing else. And he told him to THROW STRIKES over and over and over. His improvement was remarkable. He had some great seasons under Weaver.

        I doubt he could actually throw 120 MPH, but for sure over a 100 MPH.
        Last edited by Honus Wagner Rules; 01-16-2006, 12:07 AM.
        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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        • #79
          Tally up some votes from this poster for...

          -Ben Grieve
          -Shawn Estes
          -Bob Hamelin
          -Marty Cordova
          "Candlestick made me a man" -Will Clark

          "Real Giants fans loved them BEFORE and AFTER Barry Bonds came along"

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          • #80
            I'm surprised nobody said Greg Briley yet. He had one standout season in 1989 with the Mariners, then everything else fell apart. He was with the Marlins in 1993, then he was released afterwards, and never played major league baseball again.

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            • #81
              Sparky Anderson said that Torey Lovallo was the best prospect that he'd ever seen.
              "Where have you gone Joe DiMaggio, a nation turns its lonely eyes to you. What's that you say Mrs. Robinson? Joltin' Joe has left and gone away. Hey hey hey."

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              • #82
                --Sparky said that about somebody every spring. It was kind of a tradition with him. The other half of the tradition was he was always wildly exagerrating.

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                • #83
                  When thinking of the Indians these names jump out

                  Alex Cole
                  Jaret Wright
                  Russell Branyan
                  Kenny Lofton (after he returned from Atlanta)
                  Jack McDowell

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                  • #84
                    Jeff Cirillo-M's killer

                    Well, to be fair he wasn't the only reason the M's fell off but damn he wasn't helping things.
                    First off, when he came over to play third base (very decent glove) he had like a career .300 plus Batting Average. Okay, I know that he hit in more hitting friendly parks than Safeco Field, but no one was asking him to be a power hitter or even match those great numbers in 2000 in which he hit in 115 RBIs and hit .326. Would it have been too much to expect something in the high .280's or so? Instead, he promptly starts hitting like .250 and then .205 or so. :grouchy His fielding drops and before you know it he is down in Tacoma playing minor league ball on assignment. I am sure injury must have had something to do with it but he fell off the table so quick. Once the hitting h went it seemed his fielding suffered.

                    Now he is back with the Brewers and making a comeback of sorts. Hope it works out for him.
                    Johnny
                    Delusion, Life's Coping Mechanism

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by Go Bravos!!!#1 View Post
                      Josh Hamilton
                      Crazy to consider how much he's accomplished in the almost 8 years since this was posted!

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                      • #86
                        Joe Pepitone immediately springs to mind.
                        Why isn't this in the history forum?
                        "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

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                        • #87
                          Originally posted by bluesky5 View Post
                          Joe Pepitone immediately springs to mind.
                          Why isn't this in the history forum?
                          Maybe we should just start a new one and post a list of these previous names here with a link so our fellow posters can check out the old thread? I can think of a BUNCH of (censored) disappointing players over my many moons watching the Cardinals! Oh man, it is making me mad thinking of them!
                          "It ain't braggin' if you can do it." Dizzy Dean

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                          • #88
                            Ron Kittle and Joe Crede for me. Both forced out of the game by injuries.
                            They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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                            • #89
                              Bill James created the "Clint Hartung Award" for the most promising/prominent young player of the decade who didn't pan out or flamed out badly... Just as Hartung did. Brilliant as a pitcher AND hitter early in his career, later not good at either one.
                              "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

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                              • #90
                                Matt Bush, the Padres' former #1 draft pick (1st overall) from 2004. Couldn't even make the majors. Instead landed in jail.
                                "Age is a question of mind over matter--if you don't mind, it doesn't matter."
                                -Satchel Paige

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