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How many baseball town are there...really?

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  • #31
    Easy. Look at the attendance versus population of the area the team is in. St Louis has attendance numbers that are much higher than they should be given the size of the city. The Yankees should have huge numbers, they have one of the biggest stadiums and the largest population to draw on - from that standpoint any time they don't lead in attendance is a failure. St Louis was third to only NY and LA. I think that's a credit to the town and the fans - let's face it compared to NY and LA St Louis is a town.

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    • #32
      From '95 to the present (minust the last 2 years), baseball has been king in Seattle, but with the last couple years being down years, and with the rise of good teams in basketball AND football, they are no longer #1. I guess Seattle is more of a SPORTS town than just focused on baseball. We have the trifecta (baseball-football-basketball) and hockey and soccer (the Seattle Sounders don't get as much attention, but they do have a small but steady following).

      But the fans still do support the Mariner's - here are their rankings in attendance from '96-'05:

      1996 - 3rd
      1997 - 4th
      1998 - 5th
      1999 - 4th
      2000 - 4th
      2001 - 1st
      2002 - 1st
      2003 - 2nd
      2004 - 3rd
      2005 - 4th

      And their attendance was never lower than 2.65 million, and topped off at 3.5 million
      Last edited by Edgartohof; 12-13-2005, 03:50 PM.

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      • #33
        I don't think attentance is a good judgement factor. Cincinnati creates a great baseball town because the amount of attention on baseball, not the attenance at GABP. Fans understand their history, sit out on porches and listen to ballgames, and voice their opinion strongly for the betterment of the local baseball club. I think these are the qualities of a great baseball town.
        Unlike most other team sports, in which teams usually have an equivalent number of players on the field at any given time, in baseball the hitting team is at a numerical disadvantage, with a maximum of 5 players and 2 base coaches on the field at any time, compared to the fielding team's 9 players. For this reason, leaving the dugout to join a fight is generally considered acceptable in that it results in numerical equivalence on the field, and a fairer fight.

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        • #34
          I just found this thread. I don't know if it will help though.
          http://www.baseball-fever.com/showthread.php?t=26940
          Unlike most other team sports, in which teams usually have an equivalent number of players on the field at any given time, in baseball the hitting team is at a numerical disadvantage, with a maximum of 5 players and 2 base coaches on the field at any time, compared to the fielding team's 9 players. For this reason, leaving the dugout to join a fight is generally considered acceptable in that it results in numerical equivalence on the field, and a fairer fight.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by nascarfn5
            I don't think attentance is a good judgement factor. Cincinnati creates a great baseball town because the amount of attention on baseball, not the attenance at GABP. Fans understand their history, sit out on porches and listen to ballgames, and voice their opinion strongly for the betterment of the local baseball club. I think these are the qualities of a great baseball town.
            Great post. I couldn't agree more, though I do believe attendance is a factor, particularly when the team isn't doing that well. It is my heart felt belief that St. Louis fans and Cubs fans would go to the park regardless. I do, however, totally agree with you on the understanding of the game and radio listening. I remember when I moved to Cincinnati, I couldn't get over how anyone you came up to on the street would know the score of the Reds game. Totally awsome.

            I would probably say the top five baseball towns are:
            St. Louis
            Cincinnati
            Chicago
            Boston
            New York
            I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

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            • #36
              Look at attendance, revenue, Amount of major leaguers LA is at the top of the list. The Dodgers owned LA untill the 80's and will own LA again someday.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Jake83
                Look at attendance, revenue, Amount of major leaguers LA is at the top of the list. The Dodgers owned LA untill the 80's and will own LA again someday.
                You'll notice that the so called "baseball towns" normally mentioned are those city that were lucky enough to have major league baseball from 1901 or earlier. Once again, West Coast bias is rearing its ugly head. The amount of players from the So Cal area, the attendance of the Dodgers and even the Angels, the old PCL rivalry between the Stars and Angels, USC's dominace in 1950s and 1960 NACC baseball, definately make this a baseball town among the sports enthusiasts.

                For some reason all that seems to get poo-pooed by those Easterners who think that all we do here is surf and Hollywood types. Baseball is king in this town, just listen to talk radio and the local newscasts' sports segments. Well, they tend to diminish the USC-UCLA rivalry in this town, too. Imagine another city that has two major college football team in the same conference and over the decaded, vying for conference and even National titles in the same city some 12 miles apart?
                http://www.baseballhalloffame.org/ex...eline_1961.jpg

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by baseball junkie
                  St. Louis, New York, Atlanta, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco, in no particular order. Oh yeah and Seattle.
                  I lived in Seattle till 2004. I can tell you that nobody there liked the M's much till Griffey came aboard in '89, then all the "fans" came out of the woodwork in '95. Interest there has died off somewhat, but Ichiro is still a big draw and keeps fans coming to the games. Since the 'Hawks are going to the Superbowl this year (according to folks back home) they are the pride of the Northwest now.
                  WAR? Prove it!

                  Trusted Traders: ttmman21, Dalkowski110, BoofBonser26, Kearns643, HudsonHarden, Extra Innings, MadHatter, Mike D., J.P., SShifflett

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by efin98
                    Boston itself is not a Red Sox town nor even a Patriots town- it's long been the Bruins and Celtics at top teams.

                    The general "Boston area" is Patriots country, has been since 1995 or so. The Red Sox are the second team and rising but it is still far away from being the top. Even with the Red Sox making it to the ALCS in 2003 and winning the World Series in 2004, they got overshaddowed by the Patriots.
                    Ah...the red sox have been all the talk recently even in the middle of the Patriots/ Celtics/ Bruins seasons. Red Sox are #1.

                    The general Boston fan might just be a red sox fan, but this true of every city. Think you will find just as many pure baseball fans in Boston as anywhere else.

                    New York is a baseball city (of course they haven't had much success in anything else recently . The New Jersey Devils don't count)

                    Chicago is a Cubs city. I spent a lot time there. The White Sox got pratcly no attention until the playoffs.

                    Seattle is becoming decent baseball city.
                    Philly is a great sports town
                    Toronto, Detriot, KC, Pittsburg, Cincy, and BAltimore were all good baseballl towns (when their teams were good).

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Zito75
                      I lived in Seattle till 2004. I can tell you that nobody there liked the M's much till Griffey came aboard in '89, then all the "fans" came out of the woodwork in '95. Interest there has died off somewhat, but Ichiro is still a big draw and keeps fans coming to the games. Since the 'Hawks are going to the Superbowl this year (according to folks back home) they are the pride of the Northwest now.
                      Absolutely correct! You are right on.
                      As for the LA market, I really haven't spent much time there. I went to a couple of Angels games back in 1999 & 2000. The park was okay, but the fans did nothing to impress me. I think the Dodgers draw well, but the fans don't show up until the third and leave by the seventh, so I'm not sure what that says. In talking to my customers in CA, I never seem to sense much passion. Maybe people in LA have too many entertainment options to be overly passionate.
                      Last edited by sschirmer; 12-14-2005, 06:01 PM.
                      I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

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                      • #41
                        I've been convinced LA wasn't a baseball town ever since the same thing happened to me at BOTH Dodger and Angels games: I started jeering and yelling (nothing profane, wanted to take it easy on the Left Coasters; this wasn't the Bronx), and within ten seconds people politely asked me if I could be quiet... at the Dodgers' game, it was so that a guy could continue his cell phone conversation next to me.

                        Sorry, that's not real baseball.
                        "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

                        Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by ElHalo
                          I've been convinced LA wasn't a baseball town ever since the same thing happened to me at BOTH Dodger and Angels games: I started jeering and yelling (nothing profane, wanted to take it easy on the Left Coasters; this wasn't the Bronx), and within ten seconds people politely asked me if I could be quiet... at the Dodgers' game, it was so that a guy could continue his cell phone conversation next to me.

                          Sorry, that's not real baseball.
                          This may have more to do with the mentality of both places.

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                          • #43
                            Let's see:

                            St. Louis is definitely the biggest. The Cardinals are a religion in St. Louis, as far as I can tell.

                            Cincy is a baseball town, especially on Opening Day.

                            New York City is a Baseball town.

                            LA is a Baseball Town between the 3rd and 7th inning of every game.

                            Houston is a emerging Baseball town.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by thenextsuperstar
                              Seattle is becoming decent baseball city.
                              Philly is a great sports town
                              Toronto, Detriot, KC, Pittsburg, Cincy, and BAltimore were all good baseballl towns (when their teams were good).
                              Cincinnati is horrible, yet it is still the talk of the town, we are going to stink next year, yet baseball is still the talk of the town, the Bengals are playoff bound, yet Reds baseball is the most popular.

                              As Gamingboy said, Cincinnati shuts down on opening day. We stick to traditions. Cincinnati has a parade on the first Monday in April to celebrate Reds baseball. I don't know of any town that has had a parade to celebrate their baseball team every year. Opening Day tickets are most likely to be rarer than Bengal playoff tickets.
                              Unlike most other team sports, in which teams usually have an equivalent number of players on the field at any given time, in baseball the hitting team is at a numerical disadvantage, with a maximum of 5 players and 2 base coaches on the field at any time, compared to the fielding team's 9 players. For this reason, leaving the dugout to join a fight is generally considered acceptable in that it results in numerical equivalence on the field, and a fairer fight.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by ElHalo
                                I've been convinced LA wasn't a baseball town ever since the same thing happened to me at BOTH Dodger and Angels games: I started jeering and yelling (nothing profane, wanted to take it easy on the Left Coasters; this wasn't the Bronx), and within ten seconds people politely asked me if I could be quiet... at the Dodgers' game, it was so that a guy could continue his cell phone conversation next to me.

                                Sorry, that's not real baseball.
                                Dude, that's awesome. And in Seattle, you can buy Starbucks at several places in Safeco, then find a wireless hotspot with your laptop, while watching little Johnny play in the virtual reality arcade. That's baseball to folks back home in Seattle. (not to mention all under a closed roof in June)
                                WAR? Prove it!

                                Trusted Traders: ttmman21, Dalkowski110, BoofBonser26, Kearns643, HudsonHarden, Extra Innings, MadHatter, Mike D., J.P., SShifflett

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