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How many baseball town are there...really?

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  • plask_stirlac
    replied
    In the Twin Cities or Minnesota almost everyone is "a friend" of the Twins, it's now very amicable and harmless to really support them even without following them that closely (like knowing middle relievers and callups after a few weeks).

    But most people are married to the Vikings, complaints or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • holyroman
    replied
    Houston is definately a football town first. Even with our miserable squad!

    But it's coming up as a baseball town. Winning will do that. a trip to the world series will do that. Elite players bring excitement. I've been going to at least 10 ballgames a year ( i know not a lot, I blame HI-DEf TV's) since about 1991 hear in Houston. It's only in the last year or two that we started booing our own players. I know that may sound bckwards to some but that is a noticible change. Having success raises expectations of the fans, thats when you know it's a baseball town too. I personally don't boo. I express my passion in other ways at the game, but it has come with all the excitement of winning in the playoffs.

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  • Bothrops Atrox
    replied
    I guarantee you that if St.Louis was only able to keep one franchise, and the Rams went to four straight Super Bowls, and the Cardinals were in last place all four seasons, a hugs majority of people here would kiss the Rams goodbye. That is a baseball town.

    Leave a comment:


  • catbox_9
    replied
    Detroit is a pretty good baseball town, too. Now that the team knows how to win again they're pretty popular. Detroit has the Red Wings (hockeytown), Pistons, and Lions and they're all pretty popular. The Lions continue to sell out every game despite the fact they haven't won a game in 20 years (or so it seems).

    Leave a comment:


  • Russ
    replied
    Baltimore is still a great baseball town, even if Angelos is trying to kill the birds. Philly is very much a baseball town. Hockey is REALLY big there too. I think football and baseball are hard to compare. In any city, you have 81 home baseball games a year and only 8 football. I would bet that if baseball only played once a week for 16 weeks the passion and the attendance would be equal that of football in these other places. But baseball is a marathon and you can't expect pennant race or playoffs passion every day for 6 months. Here's my list:

    Baltimore
    NY
    Philly
    Detroit
    San Diego
    LA
    Boston
    SF
    Cincy
    Houston
    ATL

    Not bad, really. Baseball is definitely on the upswing now.

    Leave a comment:


  • redlegsfan21
    replied
    If you are not allowed to cheer at a baseball game, then how is it a baseball game. The roar of the crowd is one of the many factors that make a baseball game.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jake83
    replied
    Originally posted by ElHalo
    I've been convinced LA wasn't a baseball town ever since the same thing happened to me at BOTH Dodger and Angels games: I started jeering and yelling (nothing profane, wanted to take it easy on the Left Coasters; this wasn't the Bronx), and within ten seconds people politely asked me if I could be quiet... at the Dodgers' game, it was so that a guy could continue his cell phone conversation next to me.

    Sorry, that's not real baseball.

    That does not prove LA is not a baseball town. What did you want someone to dump a beer on your head.

    Leave a comment:


  • Scoops
    replied
    Originally posted by thenextsuperstar
    Toronto, Detriot, KC, Pittsburg, Cincy, and BAltimore were all good baseballl towns (when their teams were good).
    Toronto may be a good baseball town when the Jays are good, but it's a great hockey town even when the Leafs are bad. It's a hockey city, anything else can only hope for second place.

    Leave a comment:


  • trosmok
    replied
    Kauffman Stadium

    I thought Kansas City was one of the best places for baseball ever since my first visit to the Royals' ballpark. I know the Chiefs and hoops are huge, too, but the ghosts of the glory days of George Brett et.al., are still there. Hope the team can turn it around in '06, but I can't picture Mark Redman or their other acquisitions being their saviour du jour.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zito75
    replied
    Originally posted by ElHalo
    I've been convinced LA wasn't a baseball town ever since the same thing happened to me at BOTH Dodger and Angels games: I started jeering and yelling (nothing profane, wanted to take it easy on the Left Coasters; this wasn't the Bronx), and within ten seconds people politely asked me if I could be quiet... at the Dodgers' game, it was so that a guy could continue his cell phone conversation next to me.

    Sorry, that's not real baseball.
    Dude, that's awesome. And in Seattle, you can buy Starbucks at several places in Safeco, then find a wireless hotspot with your laptop, while watching little Johnny play in the virtual reality arcade. That's baseball to folks back home in Seattle. (not to mention all under a closed roof in June)

    Leave a comment:


  • redlegsfan21
    replied
    Originally posted by thenextsuperstar
    Seattle is becoming decent baseball city.
    Philly is a great sports town
    Toronto, Detriot, KC, Pittsburg, Cincy, and BAltimore were all good baseballl towns (when their teams were good).
    Cincinnati is horrible, yet it is still the talk of the town, we are going to stink next year, yet baseball is still the talk of the town, the Bengals are playoff bound, yet Reds baseball is the most popular.

    As Gamingboy said, Cincinnati shuts down on opening day. We stick to traditions. Cincinnati has a parade on the first Monday in April to celebrate Reds baseball. I don't know of any town that has had a parade to celebrate their baseball team every year. Opening Day tickets are most likely to be rarer than Bengal playoff tickets.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gamingboy
    replied
    Let's see:

    St. Louis is definitely the biggest. The Cardinals are a religion in St. Louis, as far as I can tell.

    Cincy is a baseball town, especially on Opening Day.

    New York City is a Baseball town.

    LA is a Baseball Town between the 3rd and 7th inning of every game.

    Houston is a emerging Baseball town.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ex-Expo fan
    replied
    Originally posted by ElHalo
    I've been convinced LA wasn't a baseball town ever since the same thing happened to me at BOTH Dodger and Angels games: I started jeering and yelling (nothing profane, wanted to take it easy on the Left Coasters; this wasn't the Bronx), and within ten seconds people politely asked me if I could be quiet... at the Dodgers' game, it was so that a guy could continue his cell phone conversation next to me.

    Sorry, that's not real baseball.
    This may have more to do with the mentality of both places.

    Leave a comment:


  • ElHalo
    replied
    I've been convinced LA wasn't a baseball town ever since the same thing happened to me at BOTH Dodger and Angels games: I started jeering and yelling (nothing profane, wanted to take it easy on the Left Coasters; this wasn't the Bronx), and within ten seconds people politely asked me if I could be quiet... at the Dodgers' game, it was so that a guy could continue his cell phone conversation next to me.

    Sorry, that's not real baseball.

    Leave a comment:


  • sschirmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Zito75
    I lived in Seattle till 2004. I can tell you that nobody there liked the M's much till Griffey came aboard in '89, then all the "fans" came out of the woodwork in '95. Interest there has died off somewhat, but Ichiro is still a big draw and keeps fans coming to the games. Since the 'Hawks are going to the Superbowl this year (according to folks back home) they are the pride of the Northwest now.
    Absolutely correct! You are right on.
    As for the LA market, I really haven't spent much time there. I went to a couple of Angels games back in 1999 & 2000. The park was okay, but the fans did nothing to impress me. I think the Dodgers draw well, but the fans don't show up until the third and leave by the seventh, so I'm not sure what that says. In talking to my customers in CA, I never seem to sense much passion. Maybe people in LA have too many entertainment options to be overly passionate.
    Last edited by sschirmer; 12-14-2005, 06:01 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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