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Is there a such thing as a small-market team?

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  • Is there a such thing as a small-market team?

    Is there a such thing as a small market team? The reason I'm asking this is because Toronto is considered a medium market team and they been spending like the Yankees.

    I beleive no because a combination of owners not spending money and TV packages and interet video streams let people root for any team.
    Last edited by redlegsfan21; 12-18-2005, 01:51 PM.
    Unlike most other team sports, in which teams usually have an equivalent number of players on the field at any given time, in baseball the hitting team is at a numerical disadvantage, with a maximum of 5 players and 2 base coaches on the field at any time, compared to the fielding team's 9 players. For this reason, leaving the dugout to join a fight is generally considered acceptable in that it results in numerical equivalence on the field, and a fairer fight.

  • #2
    Yes

    There is an obvious difference in some markets

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    • #3
      there is a HUGE difference when considering local broadcasting $

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      • #4
        LA and NY's markets have 20 million people each. What is Cincinatti's or Cleveland.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by nascarfn5
          I beleive no because a combination of owners not spending money and TV packages and interet video streams let people root for any team.
          He does bring up a good point here. Inovations in technology have allowed us to see games that we couldn't normally see before. Also, even in new york here i have met people who are fans of the rockies, indians, pirates and royals. All of which are "small-market" teams.
          Yankees '09

          Arod, CC, AJ, DJ and Tex

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          • #6
            how does a couple guys rooting for the brewers if they live in say las vegas or anywhere else turn into extra $ for the brewers to compete against the free spenders?

            "small market" is an economic term
            Last edited by Brian McKenna; 12-18-2005, 06:00 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nascarfn5
              Is there a such thing as a small market team? The reason I'm asking this is because Toronto is considered a medium market team and they been spending like the Yankees.
              If Toronto was in the United States, you know where it would rank amongst US cities in population?

              Fourth. Behind New York, LA, and Chicago. No, I'm not kidding.

              All of those towns have two teams to split their funds between. So if you cut those towns' populations in half, Toronto comes in second, behind New York, and well ahead of the others. Toronto is in no way, shape, or form a small market city.

              But as to there being such a thing as a small market team... have you ever been to Kansas City? Or Tampa Bay?

              The city of Tampa has a population of 303,000.

              As of the 2000 census, Long Island, the New York suburb which juts out along the southern coast of Connecticut and has a grand total of no major league baseball teams, only one minor league team (The Long Island Ducks of Islip, in the Atlantic Association) (and only one major league sports team, the New York Islanders of the NHL)... has two towns with more people than the city of Tampa: Brookhaven (448,248); and Hempstead (755,924). And almost a third, Oyster Bay (293,925). So, yes, there is indeed such a thing as a small market team.
              "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

              Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ElHalo
                If Toronto was in the United States, you know where it would rank amongst US cities in population?

                Fourth. Behind New York, LA, and Chicago. No, I'm not kidding.

                All of those towns have two teams to split their funds between. So if you cut those towns' populations in half, Toronto comes in second, behind New York, and well ahead of the others. Toronto is in no way, shape, or form a small market city.

                But as to there being such a thing as a small market team... have you ever been to Kansas City? Or Tampa Bay?

                The city of Tampa has a population of 303,000.

                As of the 2000 census, Long Island, the New York suburb which juts out along the southern coast of Connecticut and has a grand total of no major league baseball teams, only one minor league team (The Long Island Ducks of Islip, in the Atlantic Association) (and only one major league sports team, the New York Islanders of the NHL)... has two towns with more people than the city of Tampa: Brookhaven (448,248); and Hempstead (755,924). And almost a third, Oyster Bay (293,925). So, yes, there is indeed such a thing as a small market team.

                Kansas City's market is alot bigger than alot of other teams
                Last edited by Jake83; 12-18-2005, 06:45 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ElHalo
                  If Toronto was in the United States, you know where it would rank amongst US cities in population?

                  Fourth. Behind New York, LA, and Chicago. No, I'm not kidding.

                  All of those towns have two teams to split their funds between. So if you cut those towns' populations in half, Toronto comes in second, behind New York, and well ahead of the others. Toronto is in no way, shape, or form a small market city.

                  But as to there being such a thing as a small market team... have you ever been to Kansas City? Or Tampa Bay?

                  The city of Tampa has a population of 303,000.

                  As of the 2000 census, Long Island, the New York suburb which juts out along the southern coast of Connecticut and has a grand total of no major league baseball teams, only one minor league team (The Long Island Ducks of Islip, in the Atlantic Association) (and only one major league sports team, the New York Islanders of the NHL)... has two towns with more people than the city of Tampa: Brookhaven (448,248); and Hempstead (755,924). And almost a third, Oyster Bay (293,925). So, yes, there is indeed such a thing as a small market team.

                  I believe Houston is bigger than Chicago now.

                  The problem is not the city istself because S.F. has only 650,000 people and is considering a low big market team. Boston for another example or Washington DC. The population of a city does not determine the market size. The CSMA, the population of the metro area, local media and fan support.

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                  • #10
                    Yes, because small market refers to things in relative terms.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jake83
                      I believe Houston is bigger than Chicago now.
                      As a general rule, I try not to consider Texas to be part of the same country I live in. Nevertheless, the latest population estimates I could find (7/1/2004) have Chicago in third at 2,862,244, with Houston fourth at 2,012,626.
                      "Simply put, the passion, interest and tradition surrounding baseball in New York is unmatched."

                      Sean McAdam, ESPN.com

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ElHalo
                        As a general rule, I try not to consider Texas to be part of the same country I live in. Nevertheless, the latest population estimates I could find (7/1/2004) have Chicago in third at 2,862,244, with Houston fourth at 2,012,626.
                        Well, Texas was once it's own sovereign nation from 1836-1845.
                        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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                        • #13
                          After its last major export I wish it was a sovereign nation again

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jake83
                            LA and NY's markets have 20 million people each. What is Cincinatti's or Cleveland.
                            I'd have to hear from some of the Oakland or San Fran folks, but from what I've heard, there's a big rivalry between those two sports towns because they're right across the river from each other. However, Oakland has a much larger population, as San Francisco is only about 3/4 million people.

                            Regardless of the actual stats, if two teams are in very similar markets, then how does one define the term "small market"?

                            If you look at it, both Kansas City and St Louis should be in about the same sized market, since they are in the same state--Missouri. However, one could generally argue that since the Royals aren't anywhere close to being competitive, they would be "small market", whereas the Cards, which have been to the WS in 2004 and the NLCS in 2005, would not be small market.

                            What defines a team's market size? Its actual population? The "greater" area surrounding it? It's level of success?

                            If, as an example, the Phillies or the Twins made their respective LCS series for 2-3 seasons straight, would they still be considered "small market", as I'd generally consider them presently? Or would they be considered amongst the big boys in baseball?
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                            THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mattingly
                              I'd have to hear from some of the Oakland or San Fran folks, but from what I've heard, there's a big rivalry between those two sports towns because they're right across the river from each other. However, Oakland has a much larger population, as San Francisco is only about 3/4 million people.


                              ?

                              Right accros the Bay you mean. The rivarly is not sports but plain econmics Oakland is a blue collar working town city while San Francisco is what considered yuppie with the highest housing market of any city.

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