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AP NewsBreak: Yankees Finish With Record $207 Million Payroll

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  • AP NewsBreak: Yankees Finish With Record $207 Million Payroll

    Don't think this is surprising but here it is.

    By RONALD BLUM
    NEW YORK (AP) - The New York Yankees finished last year with a record $207.2 million payroll, more than $90 million ahead of any other team, according to final figures compiled Friday by the commissioner's office.

    Boston was second at $116.7 million, with the New York Mets third at $104 million, followed by the Los Angeles Angels ($97 million), Philadelphia ($94.8 million), the Los Angeles Dodgers ($87.8 million), St. Louis ($87.4 million) and Atlanta ($85.9 million).

    The Chicago White Sox, who won the World Series for the first time since 1917, were 13th at $73.2 million. Houston, swept by the White Sox in the Astros' first Series appearance, was 12th at $76.2 million.

    San Diego had the lowest payroll among the eight teams that made the postseason, 16th at $66.3 million. The Padres were swept in the first round of the playoffs by the Cardinals.

    At the other end, Tampa Bay had the lowest payroll at $26.6 million, with Pittsburgh at $30.1 million, Colorado at $32.5 million and Kansas City at $34.9 million.

    Payrolls were based on Aug. 31 active rosters and disabled lists and included prorated shares of signing bonuses. In 2004, the Yankees led the majors with a then-record high of $187.9 million.

    The average salary was $2,349,394, a 5.5 percent increase from the 2004 average of $2,227,347. The players' association, in figures released last month, calculated the average at $2,479,125, a rise of 7.2 percent. The union and management differ in their treatment of signing bonuses and option buyouts.

    AL MVP Alex Rodriguez was the highest-paid player at $21.8 million, which doesn't include $4 million in money paid by Texas, which was converted to an "assignment bonus" under the 2004 restructuring of his $252 million, 10-year contract. The changes were made as part of his trade from the Rangers to the Yankees.

    San Francisco's Barry Bonds, on the disabled list from the start of the season until Sept. 12 following knee surgery, was second at $21.3 million, followed by Boston's Manny Ramirez ($19.9 million), the Yankees' Derek Jeter ($19.6 million) and Mike Mussina ($19 million), Baltimore's Sammy Sosa ($18.9 million) and Houston's Roger Clemens ($18 million), who at 43 led the major leagues with a career-best 1.87 ERA.

    http://sports.myway.com/news/01062006/v1605.html
    Unlike most other team sports, in which teams usually have an equivalent number of players on the field at any given time, in baseball the hitting team is at a numerical disadvantage, with a maximum of 5 players and 2 base coaches on the field at any time, compared to the fielding team's 9 players. For this reason, leaving the dugout to join a fight is generally considered acceptable in that it results in numerical equivalence on the field, and a fairer fight.

  • #2
    with teams over $200M and teams under $50M it is pretty clear that baseball has no clue how to conduct business - baseball executives are so out of touch it's ridiculous - the game is headed for more trouble if they don't address this obvious problem - actually the problem screams that a solution is needed - say what you want but no other major sport operates in such a clueless manner - it is really a shame that the league and union work against the sport instead of in step

    Comment


    • #3
      Let's see if there was a 60 million salary cap.
      These players wouldn't be in pinstripes:

      A.Rod
      Pavano
      Johnson
      Sheffield
      Cristobal

      Comment


      • #4
        The thing that annoys me the most is how the difference between the two teams with the highest payrolls (about $90 million) is higher than the total payroll of 25 other Major League Teams.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by bkmckenna
          with teams over $200M and teams under $50M it is pretty clear that baseball has no clue how to conduct business - baseball executives are so out of touch it's ridiculous - the game is headed for more trouble if they don't address this obvious problem - actually the problem screams that a solution is needed - say what you want but no other major sport operates in such a clueless manner - it is really a shame that the league and union work against the sport instead of in step
          I agree that there should be a salary cap in baseball, and that the league does operate pretty ridiculously behind the scenes. The union is the single worst thing to happen to baseball, in my opinion. However, the reality is that there will never be a salary cap, and that the team with the biggest market will have the largest financial pool to drink from.
          "What league have you been playing in?"

          "California Penal."

          "Never heard of it. How'd you wind up there?"

          "Stole a car."

          Comment

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