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  • mojorisin71
    replied
    Originally posted by Bluesteve32
    We in California just love how non-native try to pornounce some of out place and street names.

    La Jolla = La Hoya
    San Jose = San Ho - say
    Los Angeles = Los An-je-lis not los an-gi-lis (Mayor Yorty did that one) or log an -je -lees
    Figueroa = Fig-u-ro-a many from other parts never get that one right unless they rememer former Angel and Yank Eddie Figueroa.
    San Pedro = shuld be San Pay-dro but many call it san pee-dro

    and unlike Texas
    San Jacinto = san ha-sin-to not san ja- sin-to and we do ahve a city near Riverside with that name.

    Since Houston, Texas was named for Sam Houston, it should be pronounced the way he said his name. I am sure none of us here on this forum were around to hear old Sam say his name, it may be safe to assume that the way the Texans say the name of their city is being close to the way Sam said his name.

    Also, if the person that is named for William Houstoun and the spelling seems to have been altered, so the pronounciation of this name in New York would be accurate since it is likely Mr Houstoun most likely said his name differently that Sam, had. Altering the spelling of names is quite common, and among immigrants very common.
    There are a lot of people here in SoCal (natives included) who say "Loss Angeles," but when they talk about the racetrack in Orange County, they say "Lohs Alamitos."

    I get a kick when people mispronounce "El Segundo" as well (el see-gun-do vs el se-goon-do).

    My additional $0.02

    Leave a comment:


  • Bluesteve32
    replied
    We in California just love how non-native try to pornounce some of out place and street names.

    La Jolla = La Hoya
    San Jose = San Ho - say
    Los Angeles = Los An-je-lis not los an-gi-lis (Mayor Yorty did that one) or log an -je -lees
    Figueroa = Fig-u-ro-a many from other parts never get that one right unless they rememer former Angel and Yank Eddie Figueroa.
    San Pedro = shuld be San Pay-dro but many call it san pee-dro

    and unlike Texas
    San Jacinto = san ha-sin-to not san ja- sin-to and we do ahve a city near Riverside with that name.

    Since Houston, Texas was named for Sam Houston, it should be pronounced the way he said his name. I am sure none of us here on this forum were around to hear old Sam say his name, it may be safe to assume that the way the Texans say the name of their city is being close to the way Sam said his name.

    Also, if the person that is named for William Houstoun and the spelling seems to have been altered, so the pronounciation of this name in New York would be accurate since it is likely Mr Houstoun most likely said his name differently that Sam, had. Altering the spelling of names is quite common, and among immigrants very common.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nomtoc
    replied
    How-stun street in NYC Hue-ston in Texas!

    Leave a comment:


  • VTSoxFan
    replied
    Sometimes I, and the rest of my family, slip into a Vermontian patois, pronouncing the syllable /i/ as /oi/ as in "Oi win' 'baout foive moils paaast the caonty loine..." with the apostrophe in "win'" ("went") being almost a glottal stop. In my house, when we're not in the kitchen-end of the house, we're "daown th' haahl". If we're hard at work, we're "right out straight" and if we're downstairs we're "down cellar."

    Add to the mix some words my Dad picked up from his relatives from Massachusetts a long time ago. Small metal bits of money are "cohens" and the brick thing in front of the fireplace is the "haath", and the long woolly thing you sling around your neck in the winter is a "scaff".

    BTW, Mom says "gararge" and I say "gerodge" or "g'rodge".

    By the Great Horn Spoon. What's this got to do with baseball?

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Originally posted by Jake83
    A little off topic But when The University of Illinois hired Ron Zook as their football coach the first statement from him was "I want to thank the University of Illinoise"
    I remember that. My father, born and raised in Detroit, also still pronounces it like that despite my correcting him. He also pronounced Barry Sanders's last name like it was the beloved Detroit chocolate makers (or the new Redskins Offensive Coordinator.).

    Leave a comment:


  • Jake83
    replied
    A little off topic But when The University of Illinois hired Ron Zook as their football coach the first statement from him was "I want to thank the University of Illinoise"

    Leave a comment:


  • trosmok
    replied
    Yait yet? Yunt to?

    What cruel joker put an "S" in lisp?

    Winsconson

    Illinoise

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Originally posted by wamby
    Southern Ohio maybe but not in the NE section that I came from. I did have a roommate in college from West Virginia who sometimes added /r/'s though.
    The one thing about Ohio is it seems each portion of the state has a different dialect than the next one. The New England-settled Northeast is very different from the Appalachian-settled South while the rugged frontier of the Black Swamp Northwest is enitrely different from both.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose
    And not just the Hoosier state, but the Buckeye State as well. And I had a full professor in English in Michigan also pronounce the r in Washington.
    There's a laundromat in New Richmond, Ohio (about 20 miles or so east on Cincinnati right on the Ohio River) called Worsher House or something like that. I have a picture of it.
    Southern Ohio maybe but not in the NE section that I came from. I did have a roommate in college from West Virginia who sometimes added /r/'s though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Hannah
    replied
    Originally posted by The Big C
    ...might just be an old people thing.
    Looks to me like its taking the form of a Midwest/North Central thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Big C
    replied
    Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose
    And not just the Hoosier state, but the Buckeye State as well. And I had a full professor in English in Michigan also pronounce the r in Washington.
    There's a laundromat in New Richmond, Ohio (about 20 miles or so east on Cincinnati right on the Ohio River) called Worsher House or something like that. I have a picture of it.
    That's how my Grandfather says it aswell, but he was born in Wisconsin. Lives here now though, and I think he lived in Northern Michigan for most of his childhood. I'm not sure why anybody says it that way, might just be an old people thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • trosmok
    replied
    Not just pronunskiation

    Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose
    And not just the Hoosier state, but the Buckeye State as well.
    There's a laundromat in New Richmond, Ohio (about 20 miles or so east on Cincinnati right on the Ohio River) called Worsher House
    LOL! How often have you heard otherwise educated souls speak of becoming orientated? Means east, don't it?

    It's a Commonist plot, I tell ya!

    Garshk, CCN, I think I've been through New Richmond, on my way to Utopia, Ohio. From there, my cousin took me to Tranquility, via Seaman, OH. Heard they have trouble keeping a sign at the edge of town there, (off highway 32.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Cold Nose
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Hannah
    The use of the correct phonetics is employed, begining on the left and proceeding through the right.


    I can't speak for the rest of the Eastern Seaboard. My experience is, however, that you are again wrong. trosmok 'fessed up the Hoosiers in his parts speak that way, but last I checked Indy isn't considered Eastern Seaboard.
    And not just the Hoosier state, but the Buckeye State as well. And I had a full professor in English in Michigan also pronounce the r in Washington.
    There's a laundromat in New Richmond, Ohio (about 20 miles or so east on Cincinnati right on the Ohio River) called Worsher House or something like that. I have a picture of it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob Hannah
    replied
    Originally posted by RuthMayBond
    Easy for YOU to spell
    Couldn't have done it without help from the Left Coaster.

    Funny...I harve this compelling urge to pronicuate it as "pro-nic-u-Rate".

    Leave a comment:


  • RuthMayBond
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob Hannah
    It's pronicuated
    Easy for YOU to spell

    Leave a comment:

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