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Baseball/'Roids...Really any worse than the rest of the sports world?

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  • Baseball/'Roids...Really any worse than the rest of the sports world?

    Today San Diego Chargers LB Sean Merriman was caught roiding up, last season he was the defensive RoY and made the Pro Bowl (All-Star game for those of you who don't watch football), the media covered it but it wasn't that big. For example on PTI it wasn't even the front story (the WS was...but still), it didn't even get it's own segment they just briefly mentioned it when they were talking about the Chargers. I guess my point is that one of the bright young stars of the NFL was caught using roids and most people seem to kind of blow it off, imagine if Albert Pujols were to be caught roiding. Imagine if he tested negative for steroids. It would no doubt be the front page sports story, but in the NFL (the most popular sport haveyou) it's not even mentioned. I just think that this is horrible and that baseball is unfairly judged.
    "he probably used some performance enhancing drugs so he could do a better job on his report...i hear they make you gain weight" - Dr. Zizmor

    "I thought it was interesting and yes a conversation piece. Next time I post a similar story I will close with the question "So, do you think either of them have used steroids?" so that I can make the topic truly relevant to discussions about today's game." - Eric Davis

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqul1GyK7-g

  • #2
    thats why one of my seahawks, Lofa Tatupu should have been ROY last year baby.

    Comment


    • #3
      It isn't the media that decides what is an issue and what isn't. It us the fans that decide what is and isn't. We as fans have a very very long history of not caring how and what football players do to get an edge or play. We don't care if they kill each other, or stuff themselves full of pills to do it. But Baseball has history, baseball has romance, and all that other jazz. We view it as an institution therefore it must be pure. Whereas football is an entertainment and we must be entertained.

      Comment


      • #4
        thats the problem with football and basketball, full of thugs, everyone thinks they can get away with anything they want to, basketball more than football though. I'm not meaning this as black people, just football or basketball players in general.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ChrisLDuncan
          Today San Diego Chargers LB Sean Merriman was caught roiding up, last season he was the defensive RoY and made the Pro Bowl (All-Star game for those of you who don't watch football), the media covered it but it wasn't that big. For example on PTI it wasn't even the front story (the WS was...but still), it didn't even get it's own segment they just briefly mentioned it when they were talking about the Chargers. I guess my point is that one of the bright young stars of the NFL was caught using roids and most people seem to kind of blow it off, imagine if Albert Pujols were to be caught roiding. Imagine if he tested negative for steroids. It would no doubt be the front page sports story, but in the NFL (the most popular sport haveyou) it's not even mentioned. I just think that this is horrible and that baseball is unfairly judged.
          I agree. Shouldn't it be that 'roids are 'roids no matter what the sport is? I'm guessing that when people hear the word "steroids" they think of Barry Bonds first. Steroid abuse is certainly front and center in the sports world, but it's magnified even more in baseball because of the Senate hearings and all the other stories involving baseball and it's players. Baseball and steroids, if not yet married, are definitely engaged. Wait until the World Series is over, and you'll see the government step up it's attack on Bonds and his pursuit of the home run record, and that'll be the only thing you'll read about baseball until a major FA signing or ST starts. Unfair, but true.
          "Those who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." - Edgar Allan Poe

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ubiquitous
            It isn't the media that decides what is an issue and what isn't. It us the fans that decide what is and isn't. We as fans have a very very long history of not caring how and what football players do to get an edge or play. We don't care if they kill each other, or stuff themselves full of pills to do it. But Baseball has history, baseball has romance, and all that other jazz. We view it as an institution therefore it must be pure. Whereas football is an entertainment and we must be entertained.
            i understand the point you're making and to a certain extent i agree. however, i disagree with your point about the media's ability to drive the agenda of the nation.

            one example of their ability to do this is somolia and rwanda. in the 90's, the us put troops into somolia to try and quell a humanitarian crisis largely because of the media attention that the crisis received. the genocide in rwanda was largely under reported until after the height of the crisis, therefore it never became an issue that the us govt had to deal with. the same is true with dufar today-if the media focused on it and drove home the genocide that is happening there, it would become a huge issue and our govt would be forced to respond.

            if the media wanted to make an issue out of ped usage in football, they could. if they gave as much ink to the issue as they do to bonds, mcgwire, sosa, palmerio, giambi, et al, what do you think would happen?

            the media loves to attack institutions. i think it's a mentality installed in a generation of journalists that came of age after vietnam/watergate. they habitually attack institutions such as the presidency (nixon, regan, clinton, bush), the catholic church (priest scandels, the roll of women in the church, their stance on abortion, contraception, etc), and baseball (steroids, ratings, labor relations). it's in their nature to view large institutions with scepticism and to look for flaws.

            that being said, i still really don't understand why football gets a pass on the ped issue. there is more than enough recent evidence to suggest that their drug testing regime isn't working (romonowski, the panthers, this most recent thing). maybe it's because there is such a long history of ped use in football-it's a nonissue because it's an old issue. or maybe it's because all they ever catch are def and off linemen-if they caught a skill position player then i think all heck would break lose. but football is as big-if not bigger-institution in this country as baseball and so i think it's only a matter of time before the media really jumps on this with both feet.

            but i don't think disintrest among fans plays much of a part in this. baseball fans-based on the number of people attending games, watching on tv, listening on the radio, buying merchandise-in general don't really seem to care about the steroid thing. i think in large part they're just ambivalent to it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by racosun
              Wait until the World Series is over, and you'll see the government step up it's attack on Bonds and his pursuit of the home run record, and that'll be the only thing you'll read about baseball until a major FA signing or ST starts. Unfair, but true.
              i guarantee you that this going to happen. especially if the dems take control of one or both houses of congress (im not bashing the dems; i'm just saying if a new party controls congress, you'll have new commitee chairmen, and they'll want to take a crack at the issue, get their face on tv, etc). but it won't happen until after the new congress takes it's seat next year. you can bet the farm on it happening sometime in late march, early april. hmmm, what else happens at that time next year? congressional subpoenas for everybody just in time for opening day!
              Last edited by hubkittel; 10-23-2006, 05:44 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                The media focuses on issues they think will be popular issues. Now perhaps this is a bit of a chicken or the egg type debate or perhaps once wishes to view the media as a bunch Hearst's running around but those are debates that would be very hard to have in this forum.


                The media didn't create the outrage to steroids in baseball. We created that we reacted to that news in a way that caused steroids to be a huge issue in baseball. We bought the newspapers, we called into the radio, we watched it on the TV. We also created the non-issue of steroid use in football. The media reports it, it is up to us to react to it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Uh the difference here is that The NFL has had a testing policy since the late 80's and has not been afraid/unwilling/indifferent about suspending top players for their infractions, when new substances become known retesting old tests for said substances and reworking the CBA/substance abuse policy to address problems like HGH without having congress drag them in and scold them like disobediant children. They are proactive and aggressive in their policy and suspending Shawn Merriman just shows that even the next heir apparent to LT is still not above the law.

                  Baseball let it's problem get out of control and is reaping the media harvest from what its sewn with years of ignorance and non-action.
                  Get out the Vote!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ubiquitous
                    Now perhaps this is a bit of a chicken or the egg type debate

                    The media didn't create the outrage to steroids in baseball.
                    i respect what you're saying. it's logical and makes sense. but i still don't really agree with it. i think you're right about the chicken and egg thing though. does the media create public opinion or does it report it? in all honesty, it's probably a little of both.

                    while it's true that the media didn't create the steroids in baseball issue, they have given it an extraordinary amount of ink (for lack of a better word in a digital age). for some reason (those that i touched on in my first post), the media has focused on ped use in baseball rather than ped use in other sports such as football, track and field, and cycling. all of those sports have as much ped use, if not more, than does baseball. but barry bonds is the face of steroids.

                    i think it is possible that the issue is too large and complicated for the modern media. it's not explainable in sound bites or 30 second segments on news channels. to do justice to the entire issue of ped in modern sports would require a week long series of articles in a newspaper-and who's willing to do that and who's really going to read it?

                    in the end, i think this issue really comes down to star power. everybody knows who barry bonds and mark mcgwire are. not too many average sports fans can tell you who shawne merriman or floyd landis or c.j. hunter is. if they ever catch tom brady or peyton manning doing peds then football will have a serious pr nightmare on their hands, equaling the one that baseball is currantly dealing with now.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ESPNFan
                      Uh the difference here is that The NFL has had a testing policy since the late 80's and has not been afraid/unwilling/indifferent about suspending top players for their infractions, when new substances become known retesting old tests for said substances and reworking the CBA/substance abuse policy to address problems like HGH without having congress drag them in and scold them like disobediant children. They are proactive and aggressive in their policy and suspending Shawn Merriman just shows that even the next heir apparent to LT is still not above the law.

                      Baseball let it's problem get out of control and is reaping the media harvest from what its sewn with years of ignorance and non-action.
                      Well there are several things wrong with that statement, first off the NFL does have a policy but that's just a figurehead...it doesn't really for anything and there are numerous ways to get around the tests. Look at half of these players do you think that just Merriman is the only player roiding in the NFL? You think that AJ Hawk's forehead is that out of proprtion with his head? Second Merriman is not the heir apparent to LT, plus LT got away with what ever he wanted he did blow and crank before games.
                      "he probably used some performance enhancing drugs so he could do a better job on his report...i hear they make you gain weight" - Dr. Zizmor

                      "I thought it was interesting and yes a conversation piece. Next time I post a similar story I will close with the question "So, do you think either of them have used steroids?" so that I can make the topic truly relevant to discussions about today's game." - Eric Davis

                      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqul1GyK7-g

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by hubkittel
                        in the end, i think this issue really comes down to star power. everybody knows who barry bonds and mark mcgwire are. not too many average sports fans can tell you who shawne merriman or floyd landis or c.j. hunter is. if they ever catch tom brady or peyton manning doing peds then football will have a serious pr nightmare on their hands, equaling the one that baseball is currantly dealing with now.

                        You can add Marion Jones and her husband to that list. Bonds wasn't HUGE untill the roids thing, but than again baseball is VERY under the radar.
                        "he probably used some performance enhancing drugs so he could do a better job on his report...i hear they make you gain weight" - Dr. Zizmor

                        "I thought it was interesting and yes a conversation piece. Next time I post a similar story I will close with the question "So, do you think either of them have used steroids?" so that I can make the topic truly relevant to discussions about today's game." - Eric Davis

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gqul1GyK7-g

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ESPNFan
                          Uh the difference here is that The NFL has had a testing policy since the late 80's and has not been afraid/unwilling/indifferent about suspending top players for their infractions, when new substances become known retesting old tests for said substances and reworking the CBA/substance abuse policy to address problems like HGH without having congress drag them in and scold them like disobediant children. They are proactive and aggressive in their policy and suspending Shawn Merriman just shows that even the next heir apparent to LT is still not above the law.

                          Baseball let it's problem get out of control and is reaping the media harvest from what its sewn with years of ignorance and non-action.

                          Yes the NFL has a nice window dressing that cause people to go ooh and aah and then go back to cheering their roided up gladiators.

                          Shawn got caught and he got punished. That will show him, next time he will do a better job of concealing it. NFL players are drugged, and whatever system the NFL has isn't working to keep them from being drugged. What it is doing is keeping the government of their backs and the fans going ooh and aah. So in that regard it is a great policy. But in terms of actually curbing drug use, it has failed miserably.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ESPNFan
                            Uh the difference here is that The NFL has had a testing policy since the late 80's and has not been afraid/unwilling/indifferent about suspending top players for their infractions
                            do you believe that the nfl has a bigger or smaller ped problem than mlb? do you think a higher % of nfl players or baseball players use peds? i know we don't have the evidence but if i had to guess, i would say that football, even with a drug testing regime in place for a generation, has a bigger problem with ped than does baseball. if that's true, why isn't football getting dragged through the mud in the way that baseball is? if that's true, doesn't it mean that their testing program isn't effective?

                            yes, it's true that baseball is reaping what it has sown but football, going back at least to the 50's, has had a serious drug problem. it took them 30 years to begin to address it and with the recent news about the panthers and merrimen, it doesn't look like they have a very good handle on it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ChrisLDuncan
                              You can add Marion Jones and her husband to that list. Bonds wasn't HUGE untill the roids thing, but than again baseball is VERY under the radar.
                              my point is proved! c.j. hunter was marion jones' husband. sorry chris. or are you talking about her "partner" tim montgomery?

                              edit: i didn't mention marion jones because i figured everybody knew who she is. she's too good looking to forget or ignore.
                              Last edited by hubkittel; 10-23-2006, 06:31 PM.

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