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Joe Girardi Says No to Facial Hair

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  • #31
    Originally posted by Dasperp
    I nominate this post for the award for unintentional hilarity.

    Personally, i think its just dumb to ban facial hair. Some people look better with facial hair and some just like not having to shave every day. It's not a sign of a lazy person and has nothing to do with professionalism. Can anybody give me one good reason for doing something like this?
    Here in the real world, I have never worked at a place that did not have some kind of dress code and shaving policy. While I don't think a neatly kept is strictly unprofessional looking, I think a goatee is. I definitely think that long hair is extremely unprofessional looking. I remember reading a column in the college in which the columnist was whining about the fact that he had to cut off his long hair for his job interviews. It had me laughing my ass off.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Brannu
      I don't know. I just seem to think that if you are a professional and you are able to do your job the way that it is supposed to be done, you should be able to style your hair any way that you please. I did, however, worry about this in my move to Albuquerque, where the culture norms are a little less hip, but, I was able to find an alternative enough educational environment that is accepting of the "outside of the box" style of expression.


      Wouldn't it be interesting if a player demanded a trade because he didn't want to follow such authoritarian practices?
      In an ideal world that would not matter. But this is hardly an ideal world. I would love to go to work in my bathrobe but I don't see that happening.

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      • #33
        --I'm pretty sure that if any player felt strongly enough about it to challenge the policy they would win. The Marlins (and all baseball teams) are a union shop. A new policy like this has to be negotiated, not dicated.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Brannu
          Annie -
          I am really a man of integrity. I have very firm values in my mind that help me to toe the line of righteousness and uphold a standard of morality that stays true to what I believe is right and just. I know, deep down, that if offered a $5 million I would not cut my hair ... that is a sacrifice that I have offered The Divine (sorry for the spiritual bent). Yet, it would still be a challenge because in many ways, $5 million means freedom from the demands of other people. And that, my wonderful friend, is a personal need of my soul.
          Having apologized in private, I now must also publicly apologize to you, Brannu, for the very public remark that I now realize sounds insulting and thoughtless. I honestly had no intention of impugning your character, but my unfortunate choice of words souds like exactly that. I have no doubt, and never have had any doubt, as to your integrity. My remark, however, casts doubt upon mine. That's okay; I'd rather wound myself than wound another.
          --Annie
          Be civil to all, sociable to many, familiar with few, friend to one, enemy to none. -Benjamin Franklin, statesman, author, and inventor (1706-1790)
          Remember Yellowdog
          ABNY

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          • #35
            Originally posted by leecemark
            --I'm pretty sure that if any player felt strongly enough about it to challenge the policy they would win. The Marlins (and all baseball teams) are a union shop. A new policy like this has to be negotiated, not dicated.
            then joe can decide not to play him. its pretty much that simple. granted, that probably wouldnt work on the yankees, but it would on the marlins who have nobody of much consequence outside of cabrera and willis.

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            • #36
              Lets not forget that Girardi played much of his career with a team absolutely devoid of character.

              Let's hope for Floridians' sake he can get them to win.
              "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
              Carl Yastrzemski

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              • #37
                --So if either of those guys decide to show up with a goatee this spring then Giradi has already failed as a manager. This reminds me of when Joe McCarthy signed on as manager of the Red Sox. Mccarthy's Yankees had a policy of requiring the players to wear ties when traveling or making public appearances. Ted Williams never wore a tie. When asked about how he was going to handle it, McCarthy said anybody who can't get along with a .400 hitter doesn't deserve to be managing (or words to that effect). The tie rule did not follow him to Boston. In fact McCarthy showed up for his first press conference without one.
                --FWIW, the Yankees hair rules have always seemed kind of fascist to me. I lost more respect for Giambi when he shaved to become a Yankee than I did when he got found out for steroids. I think Johnny Daman's caveman look was ridiculous, but I think less of him for giving up his individuality to fit in with the Yankees corporate image.

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                • #38
                  I've long been on the fence over facial hair policies. On one hand, I think the Johnny Damons (with the Red Sox, of course) lend some much needed flair to the game. Yet I can see, on the other, how the button-down corporate look Yankees command respect in how they present themselves.

                  I believe there is nothing wrong with individuality, and I disagree that a goatee necessarily looks unprofessional. I see nothing wrong with the way Steve Phillips looks on Baseball tonight. He has a goatee, but it is neatly kept, and he has a fine, professional appearance. I have no problem with that.

                  I also have to laugh when people bring up lawyers as an example. Well, if you own the practice you can pretty much do what you want. That being said, someone brought up the fact that if a player challenged this, they could win. I agree, as Greg Vaughn did this very thing when the Reds brought him over from SD. The Reds, for years, had a no facial hair policy under Marge Schott. Vaughn wanted to keep his goatee, and guess what? The Reds decided they needed his 40 bombs a year more than they needed a no facial hair policy.

                  At the end of the day, I guess it's up to management and the owner. If you own a team, you're taking the financial risk, you set policy. It's your ship, sail it.
                  I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech and a Hell of an Engineer!

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                  • #39
                    Me thinks thou hast more hair than wit...W.S.

                    Originally posted by sschirmer
                    ...how the button-down corporate look Yankees command respect in how they present themselves. ...... I agree, as Greg Vaughn did this very thing when the Reds brought him over from SD. The Reds, for years, had a no facial hair policy under Marge Schott. Vaughn wanted to keep his goatee, and guess what? The Reds decided they needed his 40 bombs a year more than they needed a no facial hair policy.
                    The Yankees corporate lockstep doesn't command my respect, in fact the exact opposite is true. It is just one more reason I think that they are far too ridiculous in invasive management and forced image, at the expense of substance. Glad you mentioned the fascist reign of manic Marge, she prohibited white shoes, neck chains, earrings, facial hair, etc., and I was totally shocked when Dave Parker got rid of his Mr. T starter kit, to play in Cincinnati.

                    I really liked Jack McKeon's laid back style, unfortunately it sounds like Girardi is bent on being mr. iron britches. Funny, though, have you seen his photo that accompanied the article? Even back in the sixties when I sported shoulder length locks, it was the guys who couldn't grow hair that were always telling those of us who could, to get it cut.
                    Last edited by trosmok; 02-08-2006, 10:06 AM.
                    Baseball is a ballet without music. Drama without words ~Ernie Harwell

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                    • #40
                      Being bearded as I am, I'd dig my heels in and ask for a trade. My ability to hit or throw a ball is unaffected by how little or how much hair's on my face or on my head. Welcome to the 21st century.
                      Ask me to change my sig! Sig changed 7 times, last change requested by MapleSyrupMan!

                      ...Just so you all know, I love being quoted. Even if you're ripping apart my post as awful and stupid, I don't care. Quote me.

                      Officially boycotting all threads with steroid talk; let's focus on the good of the game.

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                      • #41
                        I guess I see baseball as born on the backlots of America. And those backlots should be a little dirty and hairy. To me, the "cleancut" look mandated by some organizations seems too much like squashing the true spirit of the game. "Cleancut" is for golf courses, not baseball, IMO.
                        "Anything less would not have been worthy of me. Anything more would not have been possible." - Carl Yastrzemski

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