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Should the Gladiatah retire?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by The Big C
    Latrell made a comment about wanting 10 million instead of 5 million (or something like that, I don't remember the exact numbers), but one of his comments was that he had to feed his family, and, apparently, the many millions he was already making weren't nearly enough. As for Ty Law, I don't know, but I would assume it is something similar.
    Ty Law said something to that effect when he was in contract negotiations with the Patriots (he ended up going to the Jets).

    In any case, $17 million is a lot for that dismal 2005 season Sosa had, and his value has dropped to $500,000 in one short year. 600 HRs is a pretty big motivation to keep playing, which is why I think he should take that offer.

    As for the HOF, that's another story.
    SOUVENEZ-VOUS LES EXPOS!!!
    "The future's uncertain and the end is always near" - Jim Morrison

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    • #32
      mlb.com reported he rejected the offer earlier today.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Bob Hannah
        mlb.com reported he rejected the offer earlier today.
        After making a monstrous $18m last season for doing nothing but showing that a utility player could often outhit him, I wouldn't be concerned with what I made in 2006. In fact, after that disastrous year, I'd play for league minimum.

        In spending, there's the penny-wise and dollar-foolish, since people will nitpick to the nth degree about the price of an item, yet that same item can save them untold sums when used.

        I strongly believe that 2006 was Sammy's big breakout year. If he'd put up .275, hit 25-30 jacks, gotten 90 RBI, gotten some key hits, been humble, I don't think many people would be worrying about the fact that he was "underpaid", regardless of whose definition were used. At least I surely wouldn't.

        He had a great chance to re-establish his career, to make himself seen as a man who, despite strong thoughts of being tainted, could at least hit very well without any kind of artificial "help". Now he's just refused that chance because of money.

        Based purely on finances, Sammy should look well beyond what he'd put on his 1040 next year. He should look at the number of baseball signings he'll be invited to, chance to go into the booth, baseball camps and such he'd be invited to, ones that are proudly displayed on espn.com and similar sites. Those are things that happen when you're a true warrior and go out there to play, play hard, and make significant strides.

        Jason Giambi, to a lesser extent, was under a similar cloud and was even asked to accept a minor league demotion. However, Giambi, unlike Sosa, was/is still under contract. Despite last year's unspecific apologies, for which he never gave ane exact reason for this (though who doesn't know the true reason?), he came out and he put up some decent numbers.

        Granted, he did this for about the price Sammy made last season, the fact is, he still went back to being a reliable slugger who regained his stroke. Sammy, to me, had one and only one chance to do this. Your favorite active team, the Washington Nationals, took a steep chance in giving him an offer, since they could've been under a cloud of criticism had he either wasted a roster spot or just tanked it. Yet he rejects it?

        To me, had I been in his shoes and received league minimum from the Royals or Wendy Selig's Brewers, I'd have signed on the dotted line, especially if incentive-laden. Where do I sign, not how much will they pay me, would've been my only course of thought.

        As I see it, the slugger formerly known as Slammy Sammy (officially Slammin' Sammy, though) is still mired under a cloud of suspicion. If he doesn't play in 2006, it's almost impossible, unless he goes to Japan or other country, that he'll ever play again in 2007. So nitpicking about the dollars, and yet so foolishly wasting the chance to resurrect his career. Had his internal fortitude been higher and his eye on the bottom line been less greedy, he'd have proudly worn a Nats uni. It's too bad for him that he won't.

        Please forgive the length of this. Too much to get off my chest.
        Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
        Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
        THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
        Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

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        • #34
          I do not know of anyone who went to Hero to Zero as fast as Sammy.

          As a Cubs fan I still hold a bit of loyalty to this man. I try to hate him, but it just isn't that easy for me.

          600 HR's or 588 HR's... I still think he will forever battle the critics and perhaps not make it into the hall of fame.


          BELIEVE

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          • #35
            Originally posted by CubsHub
            I do not know of anyone who went to Hero to Zero as fast as Sammy.

            As a Cubs fan I still hold a bit of loyalty to this man. I try to hate him, but it just isn't that easy for me.

            600 HR's or 588 HR's... I still think he will forever battle the critics and perhaps not make it into the hall of fame.


            That's essentially the point I'm trying to make in my last post. He had a chance to battle them on the field, but now he's relegated himself to battling them off the field.

            12 jacks isn't unthinkable if you have a decent year. Heck, he had 14 last season, which was a miserable year by his standards. And all he's worrying about is how well he's compensated?

            Lemme stop bellyachin' on this guy. I'll never stop.
            Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
            Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
            THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
            Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

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            • #36
              I, for one, am happy that Sammy is not willing to make himself look like a fool in the name of a desperate quest for a number. Remember what happened to Fred McGriff in his efforts to get to 500? Yes, he could have swallowed his pride and played for the Nats this season, but what good would that have done? It's unlikely he would have performed well enough to erase the cloud of suspicion around him (for some, nothing less than returning to his 98-02 numbers would do that anyway), and it would have just crushed his legacy even worse than his 2005 did. Maybe I'm in the minority, but I'm very happy that Sammy is too proud to accept a backup role for a likely non-contending franchise in some wacky quest to get to 600.
              EAMUS CATULI!
              AC036198

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              • #37
                Originally posted by digglahhh
                Should I listen to Wu Tang or Nas tonight while I'm making dinner- .
                Hmmm....illmatic vs Enter The 36th Chamber ... that's a hefty decision my friend. Yet, if you are truly interested in poetic ghetto prophesy ... I'd go with Nas, but ... if you want lyrics that kick like kung fu - you better take Gordon Liu's concept of teaching martial arts to the people to fight the gov't and go with Wu Tang Clan.

                Slammin' Sammy Sosa should retire. Why? He has nothing else to prove, unless he is trying to assure the baseball family that he did not use steroids and would like his place in the HOF. Yes, RFK would be a tough place for him to re-establish his legacy, but, hell ... Rickey Henderson still wants to play. He doesn't want to play only for the love of the game, but because he still thinks he can play the game. Thusly, if Sammy honestly believes that he can still play the game, be a productive team player that boosts the moral of Nats fans as he did for The Cubs, then he should give it a shot. I wouldn't hate him for it. But, it would be bad for him to go out on such an embarrassing note - which is highly likely at this point in his career.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by ndistops
                  I, for one, am happy that Sammy is not willing to make himself look like a fool in the name of a desperate quest for a number.
                  I'm willing to bet he is willing to make a fool of himself if that number has a certain amount of figures in it.

                  After all, he was entertaining the offer. I doubt he was telling himself he has too much integrity to play the game at a lower level than we are accustomed to seeing from him.
                  "I think about baseball when I wake up in the morning. I think about it all day and I dream about it at night. The only time I don't think about it is when I'm playing it."
                  Carl Yastrzemski

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                  • #39
                    It's a shame how Sammy Sosa is treated by baseball fans.

                    He's never tested positive. He's never been summoned to a grand jury.

                    He didn't go in front of congress and refuse to answer questions.

                    Nobody has ever said they gave him steroids or saw him take steroids.

                    Did he take steroids? He's just about as likely to have taken them as every other player out there since the drug was created, which goes as far back as 60 years. No more, no less. I don't think any one player is above suspicion, and if they haven't tested positive or admitted it, I don't think any player should be assumed guilty either just because you want it to be true.

                    If you want to condemn him, condemn your favorite player too. He's just as likely to have used steroids.

                    No reason to hate him more because he was better at it.

                    I would really have liked to see Sammy have one more run at it, but I think he'd be smarter to retire.

                    He fed off the love and adoration, he'll get none of it if he comes back. He's old, for a baseball player.

                    Now personally, I think the drug steroids itself is vastly overrated, so him retiring IMO has nothing to do with tougher testing, but others disagree, and I'm fine with that.

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                    • #40
                      Maybe I'm in the minority, but I'm very happy that Sammy is too proud to accept a backup role for a likely non-contending franchise in some wacky quest to get to 600.
                      I'm very sad. I wanted to see Sammy beg for a job and then get cut in spring training.
                      beware of the censorship police

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                      • #41
                        I don't know how Sosa has cheated (steroids?). But the way his numbers has declined the last couple of years, I think it is better for him to retire.
                        If I was him, my pride would have told me to quit.

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