Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Today's Pitchers: what would you change about the game, more like yesteryear?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Today's Pitchers: what would you change about the game, more like yesteryear?

    Just watching a few things, I've heard grumblings about pitch counts, the height of the mound, 5-man instead of 4-man rotations, not completing games, etc.

    What are some of the things you'd change about today's game (from a pitcher's perspective, anyway) that would make it more similar to games of yore? The games you grew up when you were younger and thought it was a purer game than it is currently?

    If this goes over well, we can also include managers, hitters, fielders, etc.

    Thx.
    Please read Baseball Fever Policy and Forum FAQ before posting. 2007-11 CBA
    Rest very peacefully, John “Buck” O'Neil (1911-2006) & Philip Francis “Scooter” Rizzuto (1917-2007)
    THE BROOKLYN DODGERS - 1890 thru 1957
    Montreal Expos 1969 - 2004

  • #2
    I'd like to see fewer pitchers on a roster. The number of pitchers makes me . This would add more wins(watch out cy!) more innings and would make pitchers more crafty because the couldn't relie on speed pitches the whole season.


    My 327,000,000 dollars.
    I Would Rather Play Baseball Than Eat-Andy Pafko

    A's Fan! :gt

    In Zito We Trust!

    Comment


    • #3
      I'd like to see pitchers be able to pitch inside without hitters crying about it. I also think there should be fewer pitchers on a roster.

      Comment


      • #4
        My comment isn't about the pitchers per se...I just want the Strike Zone called like it is written in the rulebook. In my view, too many umps call a zone from the belt buckle to mid-thigh and that's it. Don't get me wrong, I don't want the "Eric Gregg" strike zone, I just want the real one.

        I also think 12 pitchers is too many, just the mere fact that teams have that many makes games go too long. Managers just can't resist making that change sometimes!

        KH14
        “Well, I like to say I’m completely focused, right? I mean, the game’s on the line. It’s not like I’m thinking about what does barbecue Pop Chips and Cholula taste like. Because I already know that answer — it tastes friggin’ awesome!"--Brian Wilson

        Comment


        • #5
          Agree with everything that has been mentioned. Pitchers need to be able to throw inside. In fact right now, a pitcher can throw a ball over the inside black, and it appears to be way inside only because the hitters are diving out over the plate.

          If you allow pitchers to throw inside without warnings, then eventually it will change the approach of hitters. No longer will they be able to hook outside pitcher for home runs.

          I'd also eliminate body armor, the DH, and the save rule.

          And the strike zone, my god the strike zone.

          With a 17-in.-wide plate, a 6-ft.-2-in. player in 1927, like Babe Ruth, had a strike zone of roughly 545 sq. in. By 2001, rule changes shrank the zone of a 6-ft.-2-in. player, like Barry Bonds, to about 410 sq. in.

          (I've marked in blue where I think the strike zone should be extended to) More than fair, and wouldn't even come close to offsetting all of the offensive aspects of todays game. It's the least they could do.
          Attached Files

          Comment


          • #6
            Pitching inside has GOT to be allowed. I think that if pitchers were allowed to claim the plate, the entire plate as their own again, then games would be shorter, offense would decrease, and there would not need to be so many pitchers, because they would not be worn out by the offense.

            It bugs the daylights out of me to see a guy who pitches inside labeled a "headhunter" -- especially a young pitcher who hasn't the best control. The negative connotations of the label are bound to make him adjust his zone, and pitch away, away, away -- to the advantage of the offense.

            Take away all body armor except that which is used to protect injuries, and make that as small as possible. Tell the umps to not get thier tails in a knot every time an errant cutter or slider binks a guy in the arm. Good grief. These days, Gibson and Maglie and Drysdale would be thrown out of every single game they start!

            Enforce the rule that if a guy is hit by a pitch that's in the zone, because his hands, elbow, etc are also in the zone, it's a trike, not a HBP. Back the hitters off the plate. Make the rules back the hitters off, and allow the pitchers to back them off, as well.
            --Annie
            Be civil to all, sociable to many, familiar with few, friend to one, enemy to none. -Benjamin Franklin, statesman, author, and inventor (1706-1790)
            Remember Yellowdog
            ABNY

            Comment


            • #7
              this strike zone is waaaay too big.
              Attached Files
              "you don't have to burn books to destroy a culture. just get people to stop reading them." -ray bradbury

              Comment


              • #8
                Perhaps someone who remembers games from 30+ years ago can tell me: was the strike zone called more consistently within games back then? I've seen umps call zones that not only do not necessarily encompass the real zone, but wander from inning to inning, hitter to hitter, even pitch to pitch. I saw a guy almost get hit in the face with a pitch and the ump called it a strike.

                I'd like to know how the variability of the umps' zone has over time affected pitchers' ability to maintain control over the zone.
                --Annie
                Be civil to all, sociable to many, familiar with few, friend to one, enemy to none. -Benjamin Franklin, statesman, author, and inventor (1706-1790)
                Remember Yellowdog
                ABNY

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by west coast orange and black
                  this strike zone is waaaay too big.
                  WC, do you think this is accurate for how Bonds' zone is called?
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Complete Games

                    Now, I'm not the historian that I would like to be and I haven't did any research on how pitching has changed so drastically over the years, however, I must say that pitchers gasing out in the 6th inning is absolutely horrible. What ever happened to the mentality that "you finish what you start"? I understand the concept behind holds and the not-so eventual save, but, man oh man ... I wish pitchers had the mentality that they are going to go out and shut the game down from start to finish, instead of hoping that they get through the 7th inning. This only leads to further annoyance when the manager goes out for a lefty to face the left handed hitter ... let's him pitch to one guy, then goes and gets another pitcher for a similar scenario. Annoying. The starting pitcher has been pitching to both righties and lefties the whole game and now, all of a sudden, the strategy has to change? I understand the logic behind it, don't get me wrong ... it's just annoying.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      One of the problems with the strike zone issue in that MLB loves high scoring games in the mistaken belief that high scores mean higher ratings and attendence. This is a big part of the reason they ignored the steroid issue. And because they feel that way they wont come down on the Umps and their strike zones, despite the lip service they give it periodically.

                      To me, most 10-9 games are lousy games, give me a crackling 2-1 game with a couple of good pitchers dueling anyday. But I'm a longtime baseball fan, not a marketing exec, maybe they know more than I do about the fans, but I doubt it.

                      KH14
                      “Well, I like to say I’m completely focused, right? I mean, the game’s on the line. It’s not like I’m thinking about what does barbecue Pop Chips and Cholula taste like. Because I already know that answer — it tastes friggin’ awesome!"--Brian Wilson

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by KHenry14
                        One of the problems with the strike zone issue in that MLB loves high scoring games in the mistaken belief that high scores mean higher ratings and attendence. This is a big part of the reason they ignored the steroid issue. And because they feel that way they wont come down on the Umps and their strike zones, despite the lip service they give it periodically.

                        To me, most 10-9 games are lousy games, give me a crackling 2-1 game with a couple of good pitchers dueling anyday. But I'm a longtime baseball fan, not a marketing exec, maybe they know more than I do about the fans, but I doubt it.

                        KH14
                        Well put Smithers (or whoever that is )

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by KHenry14
                          One of the problems with the strike zone issue in that MLB loves high scoring games in the mistaken belief that high scores mean higher ratings and attendence.
                          What exactly is "mistaken" about this?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by VTSoxFan
                            Tell the umps to not get thier tails in a knot every time an errant cutter or slider binks a guy in the arm.
                            I'd like to tack something on to this. Umpires shouldn't be giving away 1st base so easily, either. More of an effort on the batter's part to avoid the pitch should be necessary before getting an "easy" single. I understand that taking a hit is part of the game, but umpires should exercise a bit more discretion, IMO.
                            "Anything less would not have been worthy of me. Anything more would not have been possible." - Carl Yastrzemski

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Especially when its a curve that the pitcher doesn't get on top of, and the hitter just bends the elbow down and then quickly goes into a "defensive roll." It's definately a fine art, getting beaned that is.

                              Whats funny; can't believe more teams don't take advantage of the sensitivity. Especially with a pitcher like Roger or Pedro throwing, all the opposing pitcher has to do is dot a guy in the first inning. Pedro or Roger will respond in kind (as they should), and it should end at that.

                              But what happens today, after Roger or Pedro respond, is that the ump comes out and warns both benches. There you have it. Now Pedro and Roger can't throw inside anymore and are cautious about it for the rest of the game. It's a sure-fire way to get an edge when facing a stud who relies on controlling the inner part of the plate.
                              Last edited by Sultan_1895-1948; 02-16-2006, 05:51 PM.

                              Comment

                              Ad Widget

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X