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Kris Bryant turns down $200 million extension offer

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  • Kris Bryant turns down $200 million extension offer

    So is the report:

    https://sports.yahoo.com/reports-kri...214213910.html

    I'm guessing it was for ten years, and he figures he's worth more than $20 million per year. He certainly was his first three seasons, but this past year, out much of the time with injury, by WAR he was worth less than $20 million. He made about half that this past season, in arbitration, and will probably get more than that in the next three years, till he can become a FA. I guess he figures at that time he will get $300+ million, but he's gambling that teams will still pay through the roof for what usually amounts to a few years of high production.

    Maybe he was open to a shorter-term deal, like the one Trout signed, but Cubs didn't want to do that.
    Last edited by Stolensingle; 10-11-2018, 08:24 AM.

  • #2
    I think part of it is also that bryant is still pissed at the service time thing.

    financially it probably makes sense to take a big extension but maybe he wants options.

    also he will make very good money in arbitration even though last year didn't help him.
    I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

    Comment


    • #3
      Bleacher Report is claiming that he was never offered $200 million - that the story is untrue. He's represented by Scott Boras, the greedy idiot that cost his clients a lot of money last season by being unrealistic as to what teams are willing to pay going forward. Teams are finally figuring out that these massive, long term contracts rarely pan out. Plus, as cable tv goes the way of the dodo bird, there is going to be a significant decrease in team tv revenues and thus player salaries.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would never wish bodily harm upon anyone, but if something were to happen to him making him physically unable to play baseball and he ends up getting nothing after turning down 200 MILLION DOLLARS a small part of me would say "serves you right".
        My top 10 players:

        1. Babe Ruth
        2. Barry Bonds
        3. Ty Cobb
        4. Ted Williams
        5. Willie Mays
        6. Alex Rodriguez
        7. Hank Aaron
        8. Honus Wagner
        9. Lou Gehrig
        10. Mickey Mantle

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
          I would never wish bodily harm upon anyone, but if something were to happen to him making him physically unable to play baseball and he ends up getting nothing after turning down 200 MILLION DOLLARS a small part of me would say "serves you right".
          He can take a risk if he wants. It's his career, it's his life.
          46 wins to match last year's total

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SamtheBravesFan View Post

            He can take a risk if he wants. It's his career, it's his life.
            No one has suggested otherwise.
            My top 10 players:

            1. Babe Ruth
            2. Barry Bonds
            3. Ty Cobb
            4. Ted Williams
            5. Willie Mays
            6. Alex Rodriguez
            7. Hank Aaron
            8. Honus Wagner
            9. Lou Gehrig
            10. Mickey Mantle

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post

              No one has suggested otherwise.
              It is kind of suggested when you said what you did after it with the hypothetical career-ending injury scenario.
              46 wins to match last year's total

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
                I would never wish bodily harm upon anyone, but if something were to happen to him making him physically unable to play baseball and he ends up getting nothing after turning down 200 MILLION DOLLARS a small part of me would say "serves you right".
                It doesn't always take an injury to make a player have regrets. I remember a few years ago, Ian Desmond turned down > $100 million from the Nats, then immediately had a terrible season. He ended up getting a one year deal for I think around $10-15 million, and now he not only is no longer the hitter he was, but doesn't play SS, either, which further decreases his value. Of course, he's not in any danger of going broke.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post
                  I would never wish bodily harm upon anyone, but if something were to happen to him making him physically unable to play baseball and he ends up getting nothing after turning down 200 MILLION DOLLARS a small part of me would say "serves you right".
                  A completely normal reaction. It's also not like you don't know that he's worth more than that. It'll happen to someone eventually and it'll suck to be them. The Ricketts family is getting publicity for "turning the Cubs around" but I think they're going to be sub par owners in the long run. Low-balling Bryant is just an early sign of mismanagement to come in my opinion.
                  "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Today's hitters are not grasping the nature of the economic storm on the horizon for baseball. Even though I hate it, the cold fact is that baseball's current economics were created by baby boomer fans who bought into the myth of buying championships. Baby boomers will age and grow discontented with a changing sports landscape, just like we did with the music and movie industry. As a group, we are sticks-in-the-mud when we were given the option of $50 tickets, an equal amount for parking (at least in some parks), then overpriced concessions, apparel and souvenirs. We end up discussing the old-school days when a ballplayer tried to play 15-20 years, even if injuries shortened a player's career to 13-14.

                    IMHO, it doesn't seem players wish to play even those 13-14 years. They might be satisfied with 10-11 if they can break the bank beginning their 5th year or so.

                    In order to justify a big contract with long-term horizons, a player must 1) have justifiable basis to convince his team that he can stay healthy, 2) have a skillset which will age well, 3) continue nurturing this skillset by striving to outperform his peers in all of those skills in the set. In other words, if a player is a 5-tool guy, he cannot justify his demands when he has allowed the skill of hitting for a high average to diminish. Good grief, the absence of contact hitters should make it that much easier for a hitter like Bryant to shine. So, where is that shine? That is excused away because he wasn't healthy? What did I mention under 1) above?

                    As I mentioned in a post last year give or take a few months, Kris Bryant was overated as of the end of 2017. The season just passed is enough for this fan to continue with that view, and the Cubs should give him a parade out of town.
                    Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                    A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                    Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post
                      Today's hitters are not grasping the nature of the economic storm on the horizon for baseball. Even though I hate it, the cold fact is that baseball's current economics were created by baby boomer fans who bought into the myth of buying championships. Baby boomers will age and grow discontented with a changing sports landscape, just like we did with the music and movie industry. As a group, we are sticks-in-the-mud when we were given the option of $50 tickets, an equal amount for parking (at least in some parks), then overpriced concessions, apparel and souvenirs. We end up discussing the old-school days when a ballplayer tried to play 15-20 years, even if injuries shortened a player's career to 13-14.

                      IMHO, it doesn't seem players wish to play even those 13-14 years. They might be satisfied with 10-11 if they can break the bank beginning their 5th year or so.

                      In order to justify a big contract with long-term horizons, a player must 1) have justifiable basis to convince his team that he can stay healthy, 2) have a skillset which will age well, 3) continue nurturing this skillset by striving to outperform his peers in all of those skills in the set. In other words, if a player is a 5-tool guy, he cannot justify his demands when he has allowed the skill of hitting for a high average to diminish. Good grief, the absence of contact hitters should make it that much easier for a hitter like Bryant to shine. So, where is that shine? That is excused away because he wasn't healthy? What did I mention under 1) above?

                      As I mentioned in a post last year give or take a few months, Kris Bryant was overrated as of the end of 2017. The season just passed is enough for this fan to continue with that view, and the Cubs should give him a parade out of town.
                      He's had one down year. You're right he needs to prove he can stay healthy but there's no reason to think he won't be an MVP candidate next year.
                      "No matter how great you were once upon a time — the years go by, and men forget,” - W. A. Phelon in Baseball Magazine in 1915. “Ross Barnes, forty years ago, was as great as Cobb or Wagner ever dared to be. Had scores been kept then as now, he would have seemed incomparably marvelous.”

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post
                        Today's hitters are not grasping the nature of the economic storm on the horizon for baseball. Even though I hate it, the cold fact is that baseball's current economics were created by baby boomer fans who bought into the myth of buying championships. Baby boomers will age and grow discontented with a changing sports landscape, just like we did with the music and movie industry. As a group, we are sticks-in-the-mud when we were given the option of $50 tickets, an equal amount for parking (at least in some parks), then overpriced concessions, apparel and souvenirs. We end up discussing the old-school days when a ballplayer tried to play 15-20 years, even if injuries shortened a player's career to 13-14.

                        IMHO, it doesn't seem players wish to play even those 13-14 years. They might be satisfied with 10-11 if they can break the bank beginning their 5th year or so.

                        In order to justify a big contract with long-term horizons, a player must 1) have justifiable basis to convince his team that he can stay healthy, 2) have a skillset which will age well, 3) continue nurturing this skillset by striving to outperform his peers in all of those skills in the set. In other words, if a player is a 5-tool guy, he cannot justify his demands when he has allowed the skill of hitting for a high average to diminish. Good grief, the absence of contact hitters should make it that much easier for a hitter like Bryant to shine. So, where is that shine? That is excused away because he wasn't healthy? What did I mention under 1) above?

                        As I mentioned in a post last year give or take a few months, Kris Bryant was overated as of the end of 2017. The season just passed is enough for this fan to continue with that view, and the Cubs should give him a parade out of town.
                        I've heard his arugment for years. I believe the reality is completely the opposite. Players today will try to play as long as the can because they know that once they cannot play anymore and forced to retire they will never be able to make the kind of salaries they did as a major leaguer. If a 36-37 year old player can still hit and stay healthy he can comand a multi-million dollar salary. For example David Ortiz wasn't forced into retirement due to poor performance but by constand pain in his body. Had he been able to manage the pain he would have continued to play and command a huge salary.
                        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          People are never going to believe a boom will end until it does. Maybe baseball will make less money but right now cable deals still break records despite the looming extinction.


                          people are again buying houses like crazy in the area were the real estate crisis started...
                          I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dominik View Post
                            People are never going to believe a boom will end until it does. Maybe baseball will make less money but right now cable deals still break records despite the looming extinction.


                            people are again buying houses like crazy in the area were the real estate crisis started...
                            Has MLB ever suffered a bust, or collapse, like the housing market has? I have a hard time believing that the value of major league franchises will lose a significant amount of their value in short time frame. For example the S.F. Giants are valued at $2.85 billion as of April 1028 according to Forbes. Would the Giants suddenly just drop to a, say, $400 million value in a short time due to market forces?
                            Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't believe that either. Even if cable breaks down there will probably be other revenue streams.
                              I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

                              Comment

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