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  • #31
    Originally posted by Bothrops Atrox View Post
    Maybe Anthony Davis won't demand a trade afterall.
    HA. Got that right.
    46 wins to match last year's total

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Bothrops Atrox View Post

      Well, a little better considering 33% of baseball teams make the playoffs instead of the 61% that make a college bowl game.

      As of now, not a single team with a .500 w% or worse has ever made the MLB playoffs (minus maybe the funky situation in 1981. but that whole thing was stupid and we should all pretend it never happened). Since the play-in game, the worst record of a postseason team has been 86-76. Certainly there is a higher chance a mediocre team will make it, but it is NOTING like the other sports, where sub-.500 teams make it every single year. Okay - the NFL usually bottoms out at 9-7, but .500 teams do make it some times.
      Yep, and once the NFC West was so bad the Seattle Seahawks made it to the playoffs with a 7-9 record, winning a tie-breaker with the Rams. San Francisco was 6-10 and Arizona 5-11.

      EDIT: None of the teams in the playoffs in 1981 had a losing record
      Last edited by SamtheBravesFan; 05-14-2019, 07:27 PM.
      46 wins to match last year's total

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by SamtheBravesFan View Post

        Yep, and once the NFC West was so bad the Seattle Seahawks made it to the playoffs with a 7-9 record, winning a tie-breaker with the Rams. San Francisco was 6-10 and Arizona 5-11.

        EDIT: None of the teams in the playoffs in 1981 had a losing record
        The 1981 Kansas City did make the playoffs with an overall 50-53 W-L record.
        Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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        • #34
          Baseball was spared the biggest travesty ever in 1994 with the strike bailing out the possibility that the AL West would have not only had a team with a losing record win the division, but there was even a chance that a team could have won the AL West with 90 losses. The Rangers were 10 games under .500 at the point where the season ended at 114 games. At 52-62, they held a one game lead over Oakland, with the Mariners another game back and the Angels in last but just 5 1/2 games out. They were on a big losing streak at the time when the strike ended the futility.

          Meanwhile, the Yankees were having their best season since 1980, and the White Sox appeared to be even stronger than the year before. Cleveland and Kansas City were surprisingly very good, and all four of these teams were contending for best in the AL. It would have really destroyed baseball had a 72-90 to 77-85 team gotten into the World Series that year.

          At the same time, the Dodgers were a .500 team that was leading the NL West. Imagine a Freeway series that year with a LA Dodgers team at 82-80 and a California Angels team at 76-86 playing for the World's Championship!

          I don't mean to put the black eye just on baseball. It is just as bad and worse in other sports. However, baseball is the one sport where the marathon is the reason for all the excitement at the end of the season. That is gone now, and once the all-star game ends, the sport's fans of the nation turn to NFL training camps opening. In this part of the country, the SEC football meeting with the 14 coaches talking and bringing 3 players for interviews dominates the sports stations.

          Nashville is a top 30 media market. At the moment, there is a very influential group meeting with Rob Manfred concerning an expansion or relocation. You would think that it would be newsworthy. We have 4 different radio stations that are 100% sports talk, and not a single one has talked about this. In Mid-May, the talk today is about the NBA, NHL, and The Titans, and college football recruiting. One station also talked about whether Jerry Stackhouse could recruit for Vanderbilt like Penny Hardaway is doing for Memphis. There's been no mention about any baseball games last night, even though Vlad Junior hit his first two homers, George Springer supplied the most excitement of the day with his IPHR, and Clayton Kershaw and Carlos Carrasco looked like Hall of Fame pitchers yesterday.

          When I was in my teens and lived and died baseball morning, noon, and night, we didn't have sports talk radio per se, but the general talk show here in the mid-1960's talked about the hot topics of the day. There were exciting pennant races in at least one league every year. Baseball was still important enough for a radio station that played music and had casual talk to devote time to talk about the Dodgers-Giants-Pirates pennant race in 1966. I remember lengthy discussions the next year when the White Sox, Tigers, Twins, Red Sox, and even Angels were in the pennant race in September, and before that the excitement in June and July that the Cubs and White Sox could meet in the World Series that year.

          Whether some 7 foot 3 inch marginally good basketball player leaving Cal-Berkeley and choosing either Arkansas or Vanderbilt shouldn't be dominating the talk this morning on May 15. I bet 90% of the sports fans in this town cannot tell you the 6 division leaders today. Most can't even tell you which teams are in which divisions.

          There was a great tv show in the 1950's and 1960's. It was called "What's My Line," and it aired on Sunday nights at 10:30 PM Eastern Time. Two of the regulars on the panel were Dorothy Kilgallen and Arlene Francis. Bennett Cerf was one of the regular male panelists.

          Frequently, the Mystery Guest was a baseball celebrity. What was uncanny is that the panelists, including the two women, always knew what teams were in New York playing the Dodgers, Giants, and Yankees. They knew the outcomes of that Sunday afternoon's games and knew which stars played for which teams.

          The baseball players in that era were as big a celebrity then as LeBron James, Tiger Woods, and Tom Brady today. When a virtual nobody like Chuck Hiller starred in a World Series game in Yankee Stadium earlier that day, Arlene Francis was able to discuss at length his heroics.

          It is my belief, which could be right or wrong, that if baseball still only played one round of playoffs--the World Series--it would still be as popular as it was when I was young. September would still be what it was more than 50 years ago, when teams 30 games over .500 were contending for championships rather than .500 teams contending for wildcard spots.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by wes_kahn View Post
            Baseball was spared the biggest travesty ever in 1994 with the strike bailing out the possibility that the AL West would have not only had a team with a losing record win the division, but there was even a chance that a team could have won the AL West with 90 losses. The Rangers were 10 games under .500 at the point where the season ended at 114 games. At 52-62, they held a one game lead over Oakland, with the Mariners another game back and the Angels in last but just 5 1/2 games out. They were on a big losing streak at the time when the strike ended the futility.

            Meanwhile, the Yankees were having their best season since 1980, and the White Sox appeared to be even stronger than the year before. Cleveland and Kansas City were surprisingly very good, and all four of these teams were contending for best in the AL. It would have really destroyed baseball had a 72-90 to 77-85 team gotten into the World Series that year.

            At the same time, the Dodgers were a .500 team that was leading the NL West. Imagine a Freeway series that year with a LA Dodgers team at 82-80 and a California Angels team at 76-86 playing for the World's Championship!

            I don't mean to put the black eye just on baseball. It is just as bad and worse in other sports. However, baseball is the one sport where the marathon is the reason for all the excitement at the end of the season. That is gone now, and once the all-star game ends, the sport's fans of the nation turn to NFL training camps opening. In this part of the country, the SEC football meeting with the 14 coaches talking and bringing 3 players for interviews dominates the sports stations.

            Nashville is a top 30 media market. At the moment, there is a very influential group meeting with Rob Manfred concerning an expansion or relocation. You would think that it would be newsworthy. We have 4 different radio stations that are 100% sports talk, and not a single one has talked about this. In Mid-May, the talk today is about the NBA, NHL, and The Titans, and college football recruiting. One station also talked about whether Jerry Stackhouse could recruit for Vanderbilt like Penny Hardaway is doing for Memphis. There's been no mention about any baseball games last night, even though Vlad Junior hit his first two homers, George Springer supplied the most excitement of the day with his IPHR, and Clayton Kershaw and Carlos Carrasco looked like Hall of Fame pitchers yesterday.

            When I was in my teens and lived and died baseball morning, noon, and night, we didn't have sports talk radio per se, but the general talk show here in the mid-1960's talked about the hot topics of the day. There were exciting pennant races in at least one league every year. Baseball was still important enough for a radio station that played music and had casual talk to devote time to talk about the Dodgers-Giants-Pirates pennant race in 1966. I remember lengthy discussions the next year when the White Sox, Tigers, Twins, Red Sox, and even Angels were in the pennant race in September, and before that the excitement in June and July that the Cubs and White Sox could meet in the World Series that year.

            Whether some 7 foot 3 inch marginally good basketball player leaving Cal-Berkeley and choosing either Arkansas or Vanderbilt shouldn't be dominating the talk this morning on May 15. I bet 90% of the sports fans in this town cannot tell you the 6 division leaders today. Most can't even tell you which teams are in which divisions.

            There was a great tv show in the 1950's and 1960's. It was called "What's My Line," and it aired on Sunday nights at 10:30 PM Eastern Time. Two of the regulars on the panel were Dorothy Kilgallen and Arlene Francis. Bennett Cerf was one of the regular male panelists.

            Frequently, the Mystery Guest was a baseball celebrity. What was uncanny is that the panelists, including the two women, always knew what teams were in New York playing the Dodgers, Giants, and Yankees. They knew the outcomes of that Sunday afternoon's games and knew which stars played for which teams.

            The baseball players in that era were as big a celebrity then as LeBron James, Tiger Woods, and Tom Brady today. When a virtual nobody like Chuck Hiller starred in a World Series game in Yankee Stadium earlier that day, Arlene Francis was able to discuss at length his heroics.

            It is my belief, which could be right or wrong, that if baseball still only played one round of playoffs--the World Series--it would still be as popular as it was when I was young. September would still be what it was more than 50 years ago, when teams 30 games over .500 were contending for championships rather than .500 teams contending for wildcard spots.
            You make some good points. I think not only should the playoffs be shortened, but there are just too many teams and too many players for the amount of talent around. Of course it's not going to ever happen, but going from 30 teams to 24 teams would do wonders. There is an awful lot of dead weight around and guys who wouldn't have sniffed the majors years ago.

            Comment


            • #36
              It won't happen, but if two more teams were added to make 32, there could be two separate leagues of 16 teams with 8 in the National and 8 in the American for 2 distinct Major Leagues.

              The Premiere Major League could have the best 16 teams, with a B-league of the other 16 teams. There could be promotion and relegation like in soccer in Britain with the top team in the NL and AL B-Leagues moving up and the last place team in the Premiere going down.

              Comment


              • #37
                I would personally like to see fewer teams in the postseason too. I would love to see 3 teams in each league make it with the #1 seed getting a bye and the other teams playing a 5-game series. Though the layoff for the first team would worry some (though there is no evidence than layoffs actually hurt a team more than playing right away). So I do not disagree with what people are saying.

                That being said - in the real world, there is ZERO chance the MLB is going to be the only US major sports league that does not encourage a tournament-heavy playoff focus. The NHL has 16. NBA has 16. NFL has 12. MLS has 14. NCAAB has 68. The NCCAF will be at 8 sooner than later and eventually who knows.

                The MLB is not going to give up bucko bucks, scale back postseason games, and risk screwing up $$$ TV deals just to give a small majority of passionate fans their childhoods back. Sometimes everyone just has to come to terms with the new reality.

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                The Top 100 Pitchers In MLB History
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                • #38
                  Absolutely. Playoffs is where the money is. If anything I could see go back to 154 to expand the Playoffs (don't think that will happen either) but they won't shorten the Playoffs for a small number of mostly old traditionalists
                  I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by dominik View Post
                    Absolutely. Playoffs is where the money is. If anything I could see go back to 154 to expand the Playoffs (don't think that will happen either) but they won't shorten the Playoffs for a small number of mostly old traditionalists
                    There's money in games between mostly mediocre teams filled with players nobody knows?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by willshad View Post

                      There's money in games between mostly mediocre teams filled with players nobody knows?
                      What is the alternative? Sure ideally you only would want yankees red sox games but shorter playoffs also would mean more tanking teams and more teams giving it up earlier and trading anyone away.

                      this would mean more meaningless summer games with eliminated teams.

                      sure a playoff game between two 89 win teams might sell slightly worse but it sells better than no playoff game or an additional eliminated team august game.
                      I now have my own non commercial blog about training for batspeed and power using my training experience in baseball and track and field.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Bothrops Atrox View Post
                        That being said - in the real world, there is ZERO chance the MLB is going to be the only US major sports league that does not encourage a tournament-heavy playoff focus. The NHL has 16. NBA has 16. NFL has 12. MLS has 14. NCAAB has 68. The NCCAF will be at 8 sooner than later and eventually who knows.

                        The MLB is not going to give up bucko bucks, scale back postseason games, and risk screwing up $$$ TV deals just to give a small majority of passionate fans their childhoods back. Sometimes everyone just has to come to terms with the new reality.
                        Granted, reluctantly, but it must fall to a patron saint of lost causes that the postseason would matter that much anyway. What does it actually say about a sport that the entirety of Week 3 in the NFL would be played just so one team can display that Lombardi Trophy? Or, that a great number exciting NBA players are invisible to the media just because their team had no chance for a postseason?

                        We still discuss Mike Trout, and often without the intent of whether he would be traded to a postseason contender. Just that we discuss Mike Trout for the sake of the history of what Mike Trout has shown.

                        If every stinking NFL or NBA play has to have playoff implications, then spare me the highlights and I'll go on ebay and buy a DVD of World Series games from decades ago.

                        No, really. I watch reruns of my DVDs from TV shows Cheers, Odd Couple, I Dream of Jeannie, Beverly Hillbillies, and still more, and its far more entertaining than the highlight drivel ESPN displays from April to June on basketball, or on the NFL on any given day. This is news to ESPN, however. World Series highlights would top NBA and NFL prime time games, and beat that like a drum. The outcome of the games would be known like the plot of every TV show rerun, and yet the entertainment would be timeless. ESPN would be the last to know apparently, even though the numbers are there in falling ratings and attendance.

                        Today's games in baseball are mostly meaningless for baseball postseason. If that really does matter to a potential viewer as an excuse to NOT attend or view a game, then that viewer has already found himself/herself sloshing in too much Kool-Aid.
                        Last edited by abolishthedh; 05-16-2019, 09:09 AM. Reason: usual embellishment
                        Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                        A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                        Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

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                        • #42
                          Many years ago, in the early days of the Super Bowl, Al Davis proposed that the Super Bowl should be a best of 3 playoff. TV networks no doubt salivated at the possibility, rather than televising golf, hoops or hockey on a winter Sunday. Of course, this idea never got much traction, because any time there would be a split in the first two games the integrity of game 2 would be questioned. For instance, suppose Pittsburgh pounded Dallas in the first game. Then in the game the next week Dallas ended up winning a close game maybe with questionable calls late in the game helping the Cowboys. Or the Steelers QB, coming off a great game, turns around and throws 3 INT's. Davis was usually a pretty sharp guy but sometimes greed got the best of him.

                          Unlikely, but still wouldn't be beyond the NFL to try it. Or expand the schedule to 18 games.
                          It Might Be? It Could Be?? It Is!

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post



                            Today's games in baseball are mostly meaningless for baseball postseason. If that really does matter to a potential viewer as an excuse to NOT attend or view a game, then that viewer has already found himself/herself sloshing in too much Kool-Aid.
                            Yup. Everyone knows where their remote/tablet/cell phones are. And everyone has limitless entertainment options. It is a great time to be a disgruntled entertainment consumer.
                            1885 1886 1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

                            1887 1888 1928 1930 1943 1968 1985 1987 2004 2013

                            1996 2000 2001 2002 2005 2009 2012 2014 2015


                            The Top 100 Pitchers In MLB History
                            The Top 100 Position Players In MLB History

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post

                              The 1981 Kansas City did make the playoffs with an overall 50-53 W-L record.
                              Well to me that doesn't matter; what does is where they finished in the format used. Yes, they finished with an overall losing record, but no one in the playoffs, first or second half winners, had a losing record. That's what I mean.
                              46 wins to match last year's total

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by 64Cards View Post
                                Many years ago, in the early days of the Super Bowl, Al Davis proposed that the Super Bowl should be a best of 3 playoff. TV networks no doubt salivated at the possibility, rather than televising golf, hoops or hockey on a winter Sunday. Of course, this idea never got much traction, because any time there would be a split in the first two games the integrity of game 2 would be questioned.
                                Yeah, a lot of problems with that idea. Fans already wait 4 weeks from the last day of the regular season for the SB participants themselves to actually play–would they seriously follow another two games spread out over the following two weeks? And even if you try to condense that, the shortest rest any team ever has between games in the regular season is 3 days (play Sunday, then the following Thursday–I'm not sure if it's allowed to schedule MNF then TNF in consecutive weeks for one team, but I imagine it wouldn't be). There's no way any team will willingly do that in back-to-back weeks (say Game 1 is on a Sunday, then the second on Thursday, and the third, if necessary, on the following Monday), and neither would networks go for the possibility of the REAL championship game being on a Thursday night.

                                Unlikely, but still wouldn't be beyond the NFL to try it. Or expand the schedule to 18 games.
                                There's already a large faction of fans that want the two-game preseason eliminated altogether because of injury concerns. The regular season is not going to get expanded.

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