Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

RIP Hank Aaron

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #76
    Originally posted by EdTarbusz View Post

    I married into a black family and virtually none of my wife's male relatives use a diminutive of there first name.
    I get Ed but there was no intent by writers and media to mean anything negative using the name Hank. Even some players in his earliest part of his career called him Hank.

    Ed let me add this, since you mentioned your wife's relatives, what they used in names.
    Was going to touch on this before, goes with your post
    In high school, about 50/50 black and white students, all boys. I recall many blacks, James, William and more. Other blacks only used James and William. Now whites often go, Jim, Jimmy and Willie, Bill.
    Good friends with them so I would use the same, James or William, never Jim or Willie. I could see the reason for Aaron not liking, that was not the practice among blacks, thats what they chose..

    Comment


    • #77
      Could be a generational thing. I have taught mostly African American 5th-6th graders for 16 years and MANY of my students have diminutive names and MANY do not.

      Regardless, there is no doubt that many African American men do not want diminutive names - and that is 100% okay.

      The question here: is that what Aaron felt? If so - we have yet to see any evidence of it.
      1885 1886 1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

      1887 1888 1928 1930 1943 1968 1985 1987 2004 2013

      1996 2000 2001 2002 2005 2009 2012 2014 2015


      The Top 100 Pitchers In MLB History
      The Top 100 Position Players In MLB History

      Comment


      • #78
        The whole diminutive nickname discussion is definitely something that is based in reality. PRW already outlined the issue with Clemente and there are others (like "Jimmy" Brown, which was used for a few years, I'm guessing until someone used it in his presence and saw the look on his face, and all of the "Richie" Allen stuff.)

        Koufax and Drysdale were the ones who gave Aaron the "Bad Henry" nickname. That's legit. Maybe more of an insider sort of thing (like NBA players and those in the know calling Wilt Chamberlain "The Big Dipper") but definitely for real.

        Aaron was fairly tight with Donald Davidson (when the poor man wasn't being tormented by Burdette and Spahn.) I highly, highly doubt there was any intent there.

        Finally, I'm not going to comb through the whole book to look for it but I'm fairly sure that Howard Bryant wrote that "Henry" was more what his personal friends called him, while "Hank" was more the legendary ballplayer that everyone else knew of. He didn't mind it but it was almost a character he played in the years after his retirement.
        3 6 10 21 29 31 35 41 42 44 47

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by Los Bravos View Post
          Finally, I'm not going to comb through the whole book to look for it but I'm fairly sure that Howard Bryant wrote that "Henry" was more what his personal friends called him, while "Hank" was more the legendary ballplayer that everyone else knew of. He didn't mind it but it was almost a character he played in the years after his retirement.
          As noted, he certainly was introduced in formal settings as Henry, and in interview settings. No doubt he’d prefer the more dignified sounding one in those public settings.

          But like I said, he still used Hank on his autobiography, and signed his name as Hank on memorabilia.

          NY Sports Day Independent Gotham Sports Coverage
          Mets360 Mets Past, Present and Future
          Talking Mets Baseball. A baseball blog with a Mets bias

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by Bothrops Atrox View Post
            Could be a generational thing. I have taught mostly African American 5th-6th graders for 16 years and MANY of my students have diminutive names and MANY do not.

            Regardless, there is no doubt that many African American men do not want diminutive names - and that is 100% okay.

            The question here: is that what Aaron felt? If so - we have yet to see any evidence of it.
            Thats my thinking, generational, change over time. I know in my time high school 1960s-70s "most" black friends I always used the name they preferred more formal James, William and some others. Years after high school when I would see them as adults, still James and William.

            Agree on your other points, African Americans do not want diminutive, fine.

            And last I don't recall Aaron making an issue out of the name Hank.

            Comment


            • #81
              Originally posted by SHOELESSJOE3 View Post

              Thats my thinking, generational, change over time. I know in my time high school 1960s-70s "most" black friends I always used the name they preferred more formal James, William and some others. Years after high school when I would see them as adults, still James and William.

              Agree on your other points, African Americans do not want diminutive, fine.

              And last I don't recall Aaron making an issue out of the name Hank.
              Some years ago, I met a business contact named Robert, next time I saw him at a social setting, liqour being served, I greeted him and called him Bob. He was very put off and told me it's Robert. White guy, if that matters. It really doesn't.

              The greates R&B singer of the 60's was James Brown. The greatest football player of the 60's [and all time, IMO] was Jim Brown. Sometimes called Jimmy, it just rolled off the tongue in one word, JimmyBrown. Same as the 2nd best fullback of the 60's, Jim Taylor or JimmyTaylor.

              As for Aaron, I seem to remember on baseball cards sometimes it was Hank, sometimes Henry. Same thing listening to a radio or TV broadcast, they'd go back and forth.

              It Might Be? It Could Be?? It Is!

              Comment


              • #82
                Originally posted by 64Cards View Post

                Some years ago, I met a business contact named Robert, next time I saw him at a social setting, liqour being served, I greeted him and called him Bob. He was very put off and told me it's Robert. White guy, if that matters. It really doesn't.
                This guy sounds like a jerk who takes himself way too seriously. I've been called the "wrong" name many times in my life and have never once been offended by it. Life's too short.
                My top 10 players:

                1. Babe Ruth
                2. Barry Bonds
                3. Ty Cobb
                4. Ted Williams
                5. Willie Mays
                6. Alex Rodriguez
                7. Hank Aaron
                8. Honus Wagner
                9. Lou Gehrig
                10. Mickey Mantle

                Comment


                • #83
                  He's Hank in SOM, so I'll stick with it.
                  "The first draft of anything is crap." - Ernest Hemingway

                  There's no such thing as an ultimate stat.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    I don't know about you guys, but this isn't just the classiest "celebration of life" that I've ever seen for a ballplayer, it's the best I've ever seen for any athlete.

                    Hat tip to Henry Aaron. Your send-off reflects the same class, grace and positivity that your life did.
                    "It is a simple matter to erect a Hall of Fame, but difficult to select the tenants." -- Ken Smith
                    "I am led to suspect that some of the electorate is very dumb." -- Henry P. Edwards
                    "You have a Hall of Fame to put people in, not keep people out." -- Brian Kenny
                    "There's no such thing as a perfect ballot." -- Jay Jaffe

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      RE>The Henry/Hank dichotomy ... I had read the book from the library before, but I finally bought a copy of Howard Bryant's great biography of Aaron. And I'd forgotten that he addresses the Henry/Hank thing in the introduction where he talks about Aaron appearing at an autograph show at, of all places, an ice cream shop in Manhattan. He described "Hank" as a character Henry would put on when necessary.

                      "The line gathered outside and Henry girded. He knew it was time to reach into himself and become, once again, Hank Aaron."

                      "The words from the crowd solidified for him the idea that Hank was a necessary creation, a public conduit for his considerable fame, his tremendous ability, which had been sculpted into legend, and it was this distance, impossible to navigate, between what he represented to them and who he was, that Henry Aaron truly detested the most. The obvious clue could be found in the name itself, because nobody who really knew him ever called him Hank."


                      The one exception there, as with Prince/Clemente, was Dusty Baker.

                      "He had been living with the conflict for over half a century, was convinced nobody cared about the price of the moment that gave them so much joy, so Henry retrenched and let Hank play pretend, dutifully and professionally signing everything ... with the remove and distance of an insurance agent. Like an insurance agent, being Hank was, after all, a job. Yet he did not blame them for loving Hank without understanding Henry — or, more accurately, for not making the distinction between the two men who lived in one body, each providing the foundation for the other — by being surly and churlish. Hundreds of fans arrived at an ice cream shop for their wide-angle view of 715, and he obliged.

                      "When the afternoon of make-believe had ended, both parties were satisfied. The public was ecstatic: Fathers and sons and mothers and daughters got to see Hank, got to breathe his air. ... Henry won, too, for he was one step closer to sending Hank away permanently, secure in the knowledge that at this stage, the days of make-believe would become even fewer. ... He seemed more convinced than ever before that it was time to head to West Palm Beach, to the secluded home he had built, where he could say goodbye to Hank Aaron and his glossies, his Sharpies, his enormous shadow and public obligations, in favor of Henry."

                      I'm not going to retype this stuff but Bryant says the biggest example of the Hank/Henry dichotomy was in his response to Bonds breaking the record, the "Hank side" of Aaron always avoided controversy and was gracious to the point of cliché and said things like "records are made to be broken and he held it for a long time and now it was someone else's turn," where Bryant doesn't out and out say the words but the strong inference is that "Henry" was pissed to his gills about Bonds.

                      Utterly fascinating stuff IMO ...
                      Last edited by PRW; 02-01-2021, 07:34 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        RE>confirmation that "Henry" wasn't happy with Bonds ... elsewhere in Bryant's book he describes the filming of that blurb that was shown at the stadium after Bonds hit the record home run, the MLB flack who was in charge of the filming kept trying to get Aaron to "smile more" and Henry finally unloaded on the dweeb, "YOUNG MAN, DO YOU REALLY THINK I HAVE SOMETHING TO BE HAPPY ABOUT?"

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Baseball-Reference has now updated Hank's page to say Henry Aaron. (It does list "Hammerin' Hank" as one of his nicknames, but there is no reference to simply "Hank", which is a name he was commonly known by. Odd...)

                          Screenshot_20210223-230146_Chrome.jpg
                          My top 10 players:

                          1. Babe Ruth
                          2. Barry Bonds
                          3. Ty Cobb
                          4. Ted Williams
                          5. Willie Mays
                          6. Alex Rodriguez
                          7. Hank Aaron
                          8. Honus Wagner
                          9. Lou Gehrig
                          10. Mickey Mantle

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by GiambiJuice View Post

                            This guy sounds like a jerk who takes himself way too seriously. I've been called the "wrong" name many times in my life and have never once been offended by it. Life's too short.

                            Good for you. Try being Richard and be called Dick.

                            Comment

                            Ad Widget

                            Collapse
                            Working...
                            X