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  • RIP for Non-Hall of Famers 2021 version

    RIP Paul Foytack

    This comment is supported by the article posted at the link below:

    https://sabr.org/bioproj/person/paul-foytack/

    Paul Foytack pitched for the Tigers in the 1950s as a starting pitcher. From his rookie year, he had control issues, and yet throughout his career had consistent results yielding noticeably less than 9 hits/IP. This combination often suggests a pitcher with very good stuff, or a wild but blazing fastball. In any case, he led the league with 142 walks as a first year starter, and had well over 100 BBs during the next season. What is notable are the results from 1956-1958, where he went 44-37 with improving control and 7.4, 7.4, and 7.7 H/IP. Per the article below, this made him one of the top 10 pitchers in the American League over that period (bottom of 2nd paragraph).

    What I found admirable from that article is the sense of humor he brought to the game. He became the unfortunate victim of a major league first when he was the first pitcher to give up four dingers in four consecutive at bats. By his own account, when manager Bill Rigney arrived at the mound to pull him, he was asked "Well, Paul, what do you think?" He claims to have replied, "Gee Bill, I think I'm in pretty good shape. There's nobody on base."

    RIP Paul

    Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

    A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

    Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

  • #2
    RIP Grant Jackson

    As a middle reliever in 1973 for Earl Weaver's Orioles, Grant Jackson had his career year. During the regular season, he went 8-0, with 54 hits and only 24 BBs in 80 IPs. He had a career best season ERA of 1.90. In the postseason, he went 1-0 that year with 3 no-hit shutout IPs. For his career, Jackson went 3-0 in the postseasons spanning the 1970s. He gave up 11 hits in 17 2/3 postseason IPs, with a 2.55 ERA for the Orioles, Yankees and Pirates. BTW, Yankee fans old enough to remember, might recall Grant going 6-0 and a 1.69 ERA down the stretch for the 1976 Yanks in what must have been a midseason acquisition.

    RIP Grant Jackson
    Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

    A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

    Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post
      RIP Grant Jackson

      As a middle reliever in 1973 for Earl Weaver's Orioles, Grant Jackson had his career year. During the regular season, he went 8-0, with 54 hits and only 24 BBs in 80 IPs. He had a career best season ERA of 1.90. In the postseason, he went 1-0 that year with 3 no-hit shutout IPs. For his career, Jackson went 3-0 in the postseasons spanning the 1970s. He gave up 11 hits in 17 2/3 postseason IPs, with a 2.55 ERA for the Orioles, Yankees and Pirates. BTW, Yankee fans old enough to remember, might recall Grant going 6-0 and a 1.69 ERA down the stretch for the 1976 Yanks in what must have been a midseason acquisition.

      RIP Grant Jackson
      Unlike today's LOOGYs Mr. Jackson compiled 9 Ws and 14 saves for the We Are Family Pirates.

      Comment


      • #4
        RIP Wayne Terwilliger

        One of my favorite stats of the newer metrics is the defensive stat Rtot, as shown in baseball-reference's site under the fielding numbers. In 1953, Terwilliger was in his first year with an AL team, the Senators, after several with the Cubs. To that point, he had been a utility player and nothing more. There are insufficient data to calculate his Rtot prior to '53, apparently. In any case, in that season, he earned 20 defensive runs saved at 2B in a career high 133 games. He would earn 8 more in '55 with the Giants in only 78 games. For his career, his career total is 31. Since half of his career had insufficient data, much like the case had been with Willie Mays' first few years, this is an accomplishment worth noting. His profile under baseball-reference reveals that he was an all-field and no-hit stereotype infielder. I am certain that I once read an anecdote of him which supported these stats, but simply have forgotten who stated it.

        RIP Wayne
        Last edited by abolishthedh; 02-05-2021, 01:13 PM.
        Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

        A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

        Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Steven Gallanter View Post

          Unlike today's LOOGYs Mr. Jackson compiled 9 Ws and 14 saves for the We Are Family Pirates.
          And, of course, was the game 7 winner in the World Series.

          Comment


          • #6
            Billy Conigliaro

            He was the initial first round draft pick of the Red Sox in 1965 and fifth overall in MLB's first amateur draft. At the time, his brother Tony was a star slugger for Boston. Tony C would lead the league in homers with 32 in 1965. His brother spent several eventful and star-crossed seasons with the Red Sox. Billy C always played in his older brother's shadow. Baseball-reference reveals a profile showing him to be an above average fielder, and with a WAR of 4.6. Although modest, the numbers were limited by playing time as a utility outfielder.

            His biggest season was in 1970, when he hit 18 homers and 0.271 and played the outfield with his brother. One of those homers that year was in July against the Senators in a game when his brother also homered. This became one of the celebrated brothers-hit-homers games in baseball lore. Although not the first occasion, it remains one of 10 such games in baseball history. To this fan's knowledge, anyway. Also, IMO, he remained a popular player with the Red Sox before getting traded.

            https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/11/s...iaro-dead.html

            RIP Billy C
            Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

            A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

            Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

            Comment


            • #7
              RIP Lew Krausse

              On 06/16/1961, Lew Krausse was one week out of high school. He had just signed a major league contract for a record $125K as a bonus baby with the Kansas City A's. Taking the mound against the California Angels, he pitched a complete game, 3-hit shutout.

              A few years later, in 1966 he anchored the A's starting rotation. That rotation would include a 20-year old Catfish Hunter, and another future star with the A's, Blue Moon Odom. But it was Lew Krausse who would be the ace of that staff, going 14-9 with a 2.99 ERA, with 144 hits allowed in 177 2/3 innings. Only 8 of those hits were homers, giving him a league leading 0.40 HR/IP ratio (per baseball-reference on the far right columns). Later years would lead to a couple of similar seasons in 1968 and 1971, although he pitched in tough luck with the Oakland team and Milwaukee Brewers respectively.

              https://www.kansascity.com/sports/article249325325.html

              RIP Lew Krausse
              Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

              A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

              Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

              Comment


              • #8
                Rushing kids to the big leagues ahead of time became one of Finley's many tiresome habits.
                3 6 10 21 29 31 35 41 42 44 47

                Comment


                • #9
                  RIP Juan Pizarro

                  From 1961 to 1964, Juan Pizarro was a star starter of the White Sox. He went a combined 61-38, including standout years in '63 and '64. In '63, he was 16-8 with a 2.39 ERA and 19-9 with a 2.56 ERA in '64. His career record was 131-105, with 79 CGs and 17 shutouts.

                  His turnaround has been credited to abandoning experiments with a screwball and focusing on his fastball and curve. At one time when I was a kid and reviewing season preview magazines, I recall Pizarro's curve as described as among the best in the majors while in his prime. That's as in, '______'s curve is Pizarro-esque'.

                  RIP Juan Pizarro
                  Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                  A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                  Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    RIP Stan Williams

                    As he towered on the mound at 6'5" and 230 pounds, Hank Aaron once referred to him as one of the most difficult pitchers he ever faced. Stan Williams was one of the original modern pitchers who successfully converted from starter to reliever. He earned 22.2 WAR over these dual roles, although that would be 23.8 as a pitcher. He also pitched 11 shutout innings of relief in the postseasons of '59, '63 and '70, giving up only 3 hits combined for 3 different teams.

                    Williams' peak starter season might have been 1961, when he went 15-12 with 205 strikeouts, although he earned a trip to the 1960 Allstar Game too. His relief peak would likely be cited as 1970 with the Twins, when he went 10-1, an ERA of 1.99 and 15 saves. This would have been just prior to the explosion in prominence of relief pitching. Overall, he went 109-94, with 42 CGs. He was part of the 1959 World Series Championship for the Dodgers. This fact is likely how he earned the article in the LA Times in the link below upon his passing. He also was part of the 1963 Yankees, who lost the Series to the Dodgers (fixed).

                    https://www.latimes.com/sports/dodge...cher-dies-obit

                    Yankee fans would remember acquiring him from the Dodgers in the offseason of 1962 for Bill Skowron.

                    RIP Stan Williams
                    Last edited by abolishthedh; 02-26-2021, 01:05 PM.
                    Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                    A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                    Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      RIP Joe Altobelli

                      Joe Altobelli inherited the Orioles' skipper slot in 1983, upon Earl Weaver's first retirement from managing. He made the most of his chance to manage again. From '77 to '79, he had learned how to manage in the majors, with the Giants. This time, however, he had a young Cal Ripken at short and Eddie Murray in full stride of his prime. The result was a 98 win campaign, and a World Series championship after winning 7 of 9 in the postseason, including the Series in 5 games.

                      As I recall, his temperament was the polar opposite of Weaver's. The media credited this trait as the reason for his immediate success.

                      RIP Joe Altobelli
                      Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                      A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                      Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post
                        RIP Joe Altobelli

                        Joe Altobelli inherited the Orioles' skipper slot in 1983, upon Earl Weaver's first retirement from managing. He made the most of his chance to manage again. From '77 to '79, he had learned how to manage in the majors, with the Giants. This time, however, he had a young Cal Ripken at short and Eddie Murray in full stride of his prime. The result was a 98 win campaign, and a World Series championship after winning 7 of 9 in the postseason, including the Series in 5 games.

                        As I recall, his temperament was the polar opposite of Weaver's. The media credited this trait as the reason for his immediate success.

                        RIP Joe Altobelli
                        Inspiration for the Skip character in Bull Durham.
                        NY Sports Day Independent Gotham Sports Coverage
                        Mets360 Mets Past, Present and Future
                        Talking Mets Baseball. A baseball blog with a Mets bias

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          RIP Rheal Cormier

                          Canadian pitcher, and LOOGY specialist, Rheal Cormier pitched for 16 seasons in the majors. Philly fans will remember him for the outstanding season he had for the 2003 club. That year, he went 8-0 in relief, with a 1.70 ERA in 84 2/3 innings and giving up only 54 hits. Red Sox fans might remember him for his outstanding relief in the 1999 postseason of the ALDS and ALCS. That year, he pitched 7 2/3 innings of shutout relief. Cardinal fans might remember him as a 25-year old promising lefty in 1992 who went 10-10 with 117 Ks and only 33 walks. This is the memory held by myself.

                          RIP Rheal Cormier
                          Catfish Hunter, RIP. Mark Fidrych, RIP. Skip Caray, RIP. Tony Gwynn, #19, RIP

                          A fanatic is someone who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. -- Winston Churchill. (Please take note that I've recently become aware of how this quote applies to a certain US president. This is a coincidence, and the quote was first added to this signature too far back to remember when).

                          Experience is the hardest teacher. She gives the test first and the lesson later. -- Dan Quisenberry.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post
                            RIP Rheal Cormier

                            Canadian pitcher, and LOOGY specialist, Rheal Cormier pitched for 16 seasons in the majors. Philly fans will remember him for the outstanding season he had for the 2003 club. That year, he went 8-0 in relief, with a 1.70 ERA in 84 2/3 innings and giving up only 54 hits. Red Sox fans might remember him for his outstanding relief in the 1999 postseason of the ALDS and ALCS. That year, he pitched 7 2/3 innings of shutout relief. Cardinal fans might remember him as a 25-year old promising lefty in 1992 who went 10-10 with 117 Ks and only 33 walks. This is the memory held by myself.

                            RIP Rheal Cormier
                            Rheal Cormier is the fourth member of the 2004 Phillies to pass away, following Josh Hancock, Cory Lidle, and Brian Powell. All pitchers, interestingly enough.
                            Baseball Junk Drawer

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by abolishthedh View Post
                              RIP Stan Williams

                              As he towered on the mound at 6'5" and 230 pounds, Hank Aaron once referred to him as one of the most difficult pitchers he ever faced. Stan Williams was one of the original modern pitchers who successfully converted from starter to reliever. He earned 22.2 WAR over these dual roles, although that would be 23.8 as a pitcher. He also pitched 11 shutout innings of relief in the postseasons of '59, '63 and '70, giving up only 3 hits combined for 3 different teams.

                              Williams' peak starter season might have been 1961, when he went 15-12 with 205 strikeouts, although he earned a trip to the 1960 Allstar Game too. His relief peak would likely be cited as 1970 with the Twins, when he went 10-1, an ERA of 1.99 and 15 saves. This would have been just prior to the explosion in prominence of relief pitching. Overall, he went 109-94, with 42 CGs. He was part of the 1959 World Series Championship for the Dodgers. This fact is likely how he earned the article in the LA Times in the link below upon his passing. He also was part of the 1963 Yankees, who lost the Series to the Dodgers (fixed).

                              https://www.latimes.com/sports/dodge...cher-dies-obit

                              Yankee fans would remember acquiring him from the Dodgers in the offseason of 1962 for Bill Skowron.

                              RIP Stan Williams
                              I first saw Stan Williams pitch around 1960. He was the hardest thrower I had ever seen, and I continued to feel that way for a number of years.

                              Comment

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