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Cheating is Loved

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  • Cheating is Loved

    As long as it is initiated on the field, most fans do not object to cheating. It depends on many things. But if it starts OFF the field, fans find it reprehensible.

    The chance of getting caught in the act is the key.

    http://baseball.suite101.com/article...ating_is_loved
    Baseball articles you might not like but should read.

  • #2
    Originally posted by LouGehrig View Post
    As long as it is initiated on the field, most fans do not object to cheating. It depends on many things. But if it starts OFF the field, fans find it reprehensible.

    The chance of getting caught in the act is the key.

    http://baseball.suite101.com/article...ating_is_loved
    It may get a comment or two for a day or so (see Kenny Rogers in 2006) but that is pretty much the case.
    Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
    Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
    Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
    Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
    Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

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    • #3
      I hate cheating and/or 'playing dirty', because when you do, you're admitting that your opponent is better than you.

      Bob

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bluezebra View Post
        I hate cheating and/or 'playing dirty', because when you do, you're admitting that your opponent is better than you.

        Bob
        How do you explain the player who is better than his opponent but who is insecure and therefore, cheats despite being better?
        Baseball articles you might not like but should read.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bluezebra View Post
          I hate cheating and/or 'playing dirty', because when you do, you're admitting that your opponent is better than you.

          Bob
          A wonderful platitude to summon if ever you decide to embark on a side career as an author of children's books that seek to communicate superficial, contextually-devoid fables of morality...

          In the three dimensional world experienced by adults, and as a contribution to the discourse thereof.... :dismay:
          THE REVOLUTION WILL NOT COME WITH A SCORECARD

          In the avy: AZ - Doe or Die

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          • #6
            I love when cheaters are caught during the game. Like Sammy Soasa's corked bat on ESPN.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by digglahhh View Post
              A wonderful platitude to summon if ever you decide to embark on a side career as an author of children's books that seek to communicate superficial, contextually-devoid fables of morality...

              In the three dimensional world experienced by adults, and as a contribution to the discourse thereof.... :dismay:
              So what you're saying is what I think: that there is no universal definition of cheating because people have different perspectives on it; therefore, they decide whether or not they want to do anything to gain an advantage (even a perceived one), right?
              46 wins to match last year's total

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              • #8
                When it is your guy cheating he is "a competitor". When it is a guy from the other team he is a no-count horse thief who should be banned from the game. It's all a matter of whose ox is being gored.
                Buck O'Neil: The Monarch of Baseball

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                • #9
                  If my team is not trying to steal signs in EVERY game this year, I'm pissed. When the opposition is trying to communicate OUT IN THE OPEN, you watch, listen, and learn.

                  It is absolutely part of baseball, and should be part of EVERY game played today, tomorrow and forever.

                  But, stealing signs and then communicating them poorly, (like a runner on second relaying pitch location to a batter) can be dealt with by the players on the field. i.e. chin music, hitting a batter, pitcher stepping off and glaring at the runner. etc.

                  These are in-game checks and balances which the players handle themselves. The minute you do things off the field (PED use, corking bats, using electronic equipment to steal signs and relay info) you have crossed the line in a big way, as there are no longer any in-game checks and balances that can be used.

                  If stealing signs in cheating along the lines of, say, a Lego house built by my son, then PED use is the Great Pyramid at Giza, by comparison.
                  "Herman Franks to Sal Yvars to Bobby Thomson. Ralph Branca to Bobby Thomson to Helen Rita... cue Russ Hodges."

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by LouGehrig View Post
                    How do you explain the player who is better than his opponent but who is insecure and therefore, cheats despite being better?
                    YOU explained it. His insecurities make him believe his opponent is superior.

                    Bob

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by digglahhh View Post
                      A wonderful platitude to summon if ever you decide to embark on a side career as an author of children's books that seek to communicate superficial, contextually-devoid fables of morality...

                      In the three dimensional world experienced by adults, and as a contribution to the discourse thereof.... :dismay:
                      What in the name of Alexander Cartwright are you trying to say?

                      Bob

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                      • #12
                        "Think of [cheating] as a game within a game. Fans do, and that is why they accept scuffing up the ball or cheating on a move to first base but reject the use of performance enhancing substances."
                        -from the article

                        this doesn't hold for me.
                        for years we have known of substances, yet have cheered and accepted the actions on the field.

                        perhaps fans who attend games - many games - end up with a different perspective than those who do not.
                        perhaps personal investment has something to do with it.
                        "you don't have to burn books to destroy a culture. just get people to stop reading them." -ray bradbury

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