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  • #16
    Originally posted by bluezebra View Post
    The Cubs have drawn 1,205,431, in the first 30 home games games this season. That's an average of 40,177 per game, in a stadium with a seating capacity of 41,118. That's 97.7 %.

    For a team that hasn't won a World Series since 1908 (100 years), or a pennant since 1945 (63 years).

    I doubt if any other team can match that.

    And this is not counting the apartment seating across from Wrigley.

    Bob
    Most of the people there are not cubs fans. Most of the people there are fans of booze. If not for the carnival atmosphere of the worlds largest outdoor bar, noone would go to cubs games. People dont go for the game, people go for the booze and colleged age girls, who go there for booze.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Richard View Post
      The most fans, best attended stadium, most fanatical and where baseball is clearly the most popular game professionally in town.
      In my very biased opinion, Boston. Always sells out, easily the most popular team, and tons of fanatics.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by bryanspellman View Post
        Based on this I would say New York!

        Most Fans: Check (Yankees AND Mets)
        Best Attended Stadium: Check (millions alone at Yankee Stadium)
        Most Fanatical: I would say tie with Boston
        Most Popular Game In Town: Check. please NYC has 2 football teams, 2 hockey teams and the NBA yet it's always a sell out at Yankee Stadium

        So hands down NYC! :applaud:
        Yankee fan propaganda. Yankee Stadium capacity: 57, 545; 2008 attendance: 1,339,311; avg; 51,512; 89.5%. NOT exactly a full house every game. And over 8% less per game than the Cubs. Mets averaging almost 6,000 under capacity each game. And New York has over TWICE the population of Chicago.

        NYC has NO football team. The Giants and Jets play in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Islanders hockey team plays in Uniondale, which is on Long Island, in Nassau County.

        Of course New Yawkers consider everywhere east of the (polluted) Hudson River is New York City.

        Bob

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Utility07 View Post
          Most of the people there are not cubs fans. Most of the people there are fans of booze. If not for the carnival atmosphere of the worlds largest outdoor bar, noone would go to cubs games. People dont go for the game, people go for the booze and colleged age girls, who go there for booze.

          There are enough bars in Chicago, and enough college hangouts, where one can get booze and broads, WITHOUT paying for a ticket to Wrigley Field. You can get a lot of both at any bar for what a ticket cost.

          You obviously know little about baseball, and NOTHING about Chicago and the Cubs fans.

          Bob

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          • #20
            You can't base it on attendance. It is a lot easier for teams in big cities like New York, Chicago, and LA to draw big crowds than smaller markets like Tampa Bay, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh, etc. simply because they have a larger population to draw from.

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            • #21
              Well, I think we can rule out Miami...

              Based on Richard's criteria, the best baseball town has to be a town in which baseball is the primary sport. That makes NYC an iffy choice, IMHO. Aren't they football crazy, too? What about hockey and basketball?

              St. Louis has the Rams (why did they ever let the football Cardinals go? ), and the Blues, but I have to vote for it as the best baseball town since baseball is by far the oldest and most "enthused over" sport there. And those fans know what-for, too. Plus, they are decent to visiting players.
              Born to an age where horror has become commonplace, where tragedy has, by its monotonous repetition, become a parody of sorrow, we need to fence off a few parks where humans try to be fair, where skill has some hope of reward, [and] where absurdity has a harder time than usual getting a ticket." -- Thomas Boswell, 1984

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Utility07 View Post
                Most of the people there are not cubs fans. Most of the people there are fans of booze. If not for the carnival atmosphere of the worlds largest outdoor bar, noone would go to cubs games. People dont go for the game, people go for the booze and colleged age girls, who go there for booze.
                I wouldnt go that far. While its true there is more then its share of partying done at Wrigley, and to a lesser extent Comiskey, its also true Chicago is a madman baseball town.
                "Let me start by telling you this: I have never used steroids. Period. I don't know how to say it any more clearly than that. Never." :hyper:

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                • #23
                  Here's a twist.

                  The question is about baseball, and as I read it that doesn't necessarily mean just MLB. Anyone here have any experience with Japanese "baseball cities?" How about Hispanic ones?

                  WHere does the love of the game in Tokyo play against the same in New York or Boston? Anyone hazard a guess? They take their baseball pretty seriously in Japan after all. As evidenced by all the Japanese fans that are finding their way into an already crowded Fenway to root for Dice-K and Oki.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Imgran View Post
                    Here's a twist.

                    The question is about baseball, and as I read it that doesn't necessarily mean just MLB. Anyone here have any experience with Japanese "baseball cities?" How about Hispanic ones?

                    WHere does the love of the game in Tokyo play against the same in New York or Boston? Anyone hazard a guess? They take their baseball pretty seriously in Japan after all. As evidenced by all the Japanese fans that are finding their way into an already crowded Fenway to root for Dice-K and Oki.
                    I just read You Gotta Have Wa. That's a different level of seriousness than what we see here.
                    Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
                    Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
                    Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
                    Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
                    Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by bluezebra View Post
                      There are enough bars in Chicago, and enough college hangouts, where one can get booze and broads, WITHOUT paying for a ticket to Wrigley Field. You can get a lot of both at any bar for what a ticket cost.

                      You obviously know little about baseball, and NOTHING about Chicago and the Cubs fans.

                      Bob
                      I'm a Chicago native, and I'm afraid that I have to second the notion that Wrigley is a "party central". Of course, the Cubs have lots of rabid fans, but so many people go to Wrigley just for the fun atmosphere or to be seen there. Wrigley is a wonderful, magical place, my favorite park.
                      I have only lived near five baseball cities...Chicago, St. Louis, Dallas, Detroit, and Boston. I have some familiarity with the baseball scenes in Milwaukee, SF/Oakland, Minneapolis, Atlanta, NYC, and LA. In my experience, it's clearly St. Louis for the title, but there are a lot of cities I know very little about as far as baseball.
                      "I throw him four wide ones, then try to pick him off first base." - Preacher Roe on pitching to Musial

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose View Post
                        Detroit is a good baseball town, very knowledgable fans who love their teams history. Right now the Tigers are taking a back seat to a couple other teams who are doing very well, though. But Detroit is still a good baseball city.

                        It's St. Louis, though.
                        I agree with your overall assessment, St. Louis is number 1 in baseball. That said, I think Detroit for all the history of it's baseball team is a football town. Back when the Lions were in the Silverdome the metro Detroit region (if you include Lansing) brought out nearly 250K football fans every weekend between college and the pros (if you can call the Lions pros). I doubt no other region could come close to matching that.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by tigers527 View Post
                          I agree with your overall assessment, St. Louis is number 1 in baseball. That said, I think Detroit for all the history of it's baseball team is a football town. Back when the Lions were in the Silverdome the metro Detroit region (if you include Lansing) brought out nearly 250K football fans every weekend between college and the pros (if you can call the Lions pros). I doubt no other region could come close to matching that.
                          Some of that can be attributed to the size of the Silverdome and the Big House, not to slight Spartan Stadium. I do remember the Lions getting blacked out on TV quite a bit for home games. When things were going well, it was great for Lions fans, I've never heard a bigger stadium ovation than what Billy Sims got when it was confirmed he was going to stay a Lion and not go to the USFL. But things are more often than not so great since William Clay Ford took over and gave the reigns to Russ Thomas all those years ago.

                          Detroit is a great sports town, period. Look at how strong the PCL is year after year after year in basketball. And how strong hockey is from the lowest level on up. Football may be king in Michigan itself, though.
                          Dave Bill Tom George Mark Bob Ernie Soupy Dick Alex Sparky
                          Joe Gary MCA Emanuel Sonny Dave Earl Stan
                          Jonathan Neil Roger Anthony Ray Thomas Art Don
                          Gates Philip John Warrior Rik Casey Tony Horace
                          Robin Bill Ernie JEDI

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by tigers527 View Post
                            I agree with your overall assessment, St. Louis is number 1 in baseball. That said, I think Detroit for all the history of it's baseball team is a football town. Back when the Lions were in the Silverdome the metro Detroit region (if you include Lansing) brought out nearly 250K football fans every weekend between college and the pros (if you can call the Lions pros). I doubt no other region could come close to matching that.
                            Wow 250k fans, I knew they loved their football and baseball, but I always thought Detroit was more of a hockey or basketball town! I guess it's an all around sports town!

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Dogdaze View Post
                              Wow 250k fans, I knew they loved their football and baseball, but I always thought Detroit was more of a hockey or basketball town! I guess it's an all around sports town!
                              Detroit is and always be Hockeytown.
                              Unlike most other team sports, in which teams usually have an equivalent number of players on the field at any given time, in baseball the hitting team is at a numerical disadvantage, with a maximum of 5 players and 2 base coaches on the field at any time, compared to the fielding team's 9 players. For this reason, leaving the dugout to join a fight is generally considered acceptable in that it results in numerical equivalence on the field, and a fairer fight.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Captain Cold Nose View Post
                                I do remember the Lions getting blacked out on TV quite a bit for home games.
                                My only memory of any significant number of black outs was the lean years between Billy Sims and Barry Sanders. That was kinda unfair of the league to require the Silverdome to be sold out since it had one of the largest capacities of any NFL venue at the time (83K give or take)?

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