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Former umpire Harry Wendelstedt passes away

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  • Former umpire Harry Wendelstedt passes away

    DAYTONA BEACH -- Retired Major League Baseball umpire Harry Wendelstedt died this morning at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center. He was 73.

    Wendelstedt, a longtime Ormond Beach resident, umpired for 33 seasons in the majors, including five World Series, seven National League Championship Series and four All-Star Games.
    Read more:

    http://www.news-journalonline.com/br...ead-at-73.html

    Anyone think he did enough to merit Hall of Fame consideration?

  • #2
    A true professional who commanded respect. RIP Blue.
    San Francisco Giants, World Series Champions in 2010, 2012, and 2014!!!

    "Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts" ~ Albert Einstein

    "Royals wear crowns, but Champions Kiss the Ring" ~ Jeremy Affeldt

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    • #3
      Oh man, that's too bad. Definitely a pro's pro. RIP Harry.

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      • #4
        Always happy to see him doing a game. I knew you would see his best effort.

        His "Sit down and shut up! You're embarrassing your date!" is the funniest line I've heard from an ump to a heckling fan.
        3 6 10 21 29 31 35 41 42 44 47

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        • #5
          Wasn't Harry the umpire with the loudest "strike" call in baseball?
          Strikeouts are boring! Besides that, they're fascist. Throw some ground balls - it's more democratic.-Crash Davis

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Honus Wagner Rules View Post
            Wasn't Harry the umpire with the loudest "strike" call in baseball?
            "Dutch" Rennert was the loudest I ever heard. You could hear him loud and clear in the center field bleachers.
            They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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            • #7
              Yeah, Dutch had the best set of lungs in the business.

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              • #8
                Dutch worked with Harry for several years--a GREAT crew, also with Lee Weyer and Ed Montague.

                Wendelstedt deserved to be in the Hall of Fame right after Doug Harvey went in (and Harvey should have been in long before). First, Wendelstedt was a very well-respected NL umpire for 33 seasons--for a while, only Harvey was considered better. But for nearly half a century, he has been involved in and then owned the school where a lot of umpires train, so he has had a great influence on the entire profession.

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                • #9
                  nice to know that his son Harry JR , who goes by his middle name hunter
                  wear #21 (his father's old number) to honor him
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Michael Green View Post
                    Dutch worked with Harry for several years--a GREAT crew, also with Lee Weyer and Ed Montague.

                    Wendelstedt deserved to be in the Hall of Fame right after Doug Harvey went in (and Harvey should have been in long before). First, Wendelstedt was a very well-respected NL umpire for 33 seasons--for a while, only Harvey was considered better. But for nearly half a century, he has been involved in and then owned the school where a lot of umpires train, so he has had a great influence on the entire profession.
                    I had forgotten about his umpiring school. That combined with his long and meritorious service should have warranted a ticket to Cooperstown.
                    They call me Mr. Baseball. Not because of my love for the game; because of all the stitches in my head.

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                    • #11
                      I believe he was the ump who infamously allowed Drysdale's scoreless inning streak to go on by disallowing Dick Dietz HBP
                      1. The more I learn, the more convinced I am that many players are over-rated due to inflated stats from offensive home parks (and eras)
                      2. Strat-O-Matic Baseball Player, Collector and Hobbyist since 1969, visit my strat site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/GamersParadise
                      3. My table top gaming blog: http://cary333.blogspot.com/

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                      • #12
                        I read about this sad news yesterday, and was instantly transported back to my youth. Harry was a great umpire, as most longtime NL fans can attest to. RIP Harry Wendelstedt.
                        unknown brooklyn cabbie " how are the brooks doin"
                        unknown fan "good they got three men on base"
                        unknown brooklyn cabbie "which one?"

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by 9RoyHobbsRF View Post
                          I believe he was the ump who infamously allowed Drysdale's scoreless inning streak to go on by disallowing Dick Dietz HBP
                          FAMOUSLY, Roy, famously! He did, and The New York Times had a great story in his obituary (written Bruce Weber, who did that fine book on umpires). Mike Winters, who worked with him, said they were walking on the field at Candlestick and Wendelstedt said they always scream at me here over a call made 25 years ago. Winters said, yeah, right. They get onto the field and from the stands somebody yells, "Wendelstedt, you blew the call on Dietz!"

                          Ironically, when Orel Hershiser broke the record, his streak survived when Paul Runge called a double play to negate a run scoring, I believe in San Diego.

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